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Does dual task training improve walking performance of older adults with concern of falling?
BMC Geriatr. 2017 09 11; 17(1):213.BG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Older adults with concerns of falling show decrements of gait stability under single (ST) and dual task (DT) conditions. To compare the effects of a DT training integrating task managing strategies for independent living older adults with and without concern about falling (CoF) to a non-training control group on walking performance under ST and DT conditions.

METHODS

Single center parallel group single blind randomized controlled trial with group-based interventions (DT-managing balance training) compared to a control group (Ninety-five independent living older adults; 71.5 ± 5.2 years). A progressive DT training (12 sessions; 60 min each; 12 weeks) including task-managing strategies was compared to a non-training control group.

SETTING

group based intervention for independent living elderly in a gym. ST and DT walking (visual verbal Stroop task) were measured on a treadmill. Gait parameters (step length, step width, and gait line) and cognitive performance while walking were compared with a 2x2x2 Repeated Measures Analyses of Variance.

RESULTS

Participants in the intervention group showed an increased step length under ST and DT conditions following the intervention, for both people with and without CoF compared to their respective control groups. Foot rolling movement and cognitive performance while walking however only improved in participants without CoF.

CONCLUSIONS

The results showed that DT managing training can improve walking performance under ST and DT conditions in people with and without CoF. Additional treatment to directly address CoF, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, should be considered to further improve the cautious gait pattern (as evidenced by reduced foot rolling movements).

TRIAL REGISTRATION

The study was retrospectively registered in the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS; Identification number DRKS00012382 , 11.05.2017).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Movement Science, University of Hamburg, Mollerstr. 10, Turmweg, 20148, Hamburg, Germany. bettina.wollesen@uni-hamburg.de.Human Movement Science, University of Hamburg, Mollerstr. 10, Turmweg, 20148, Hamburg, Germany.Human Movement Science, University of Hamburg, Mollerstr. 10, Turmweg, 20148, Hamburg, Germany.Department of Health Science, Neuroscience Research Australia, University of New South Wales, Margarete Ainsworth Building, Barker Street, Randwick, Sydney, NSW, 2031, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28893187

Citation

Wollesen, B, et al. "Does Dual Task Training Improve Walking Performance of Older Adults With Concern of Falling?" BMC Geriatrics, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 213.
Wollesen B, Schulz S, Seydell L, et al. Does dual task training improve walking performance of older adults with concern of falling? BMC Geriatr. 2017;17(1):213.
Wollesen, B., Schulz, S., Seydell, L., & Delbaere, K. (2017). Does dual task training improve walking performance of older adults with concern of falling? BMC Geriatrics, 17(1), 213. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0610-5
Wollesen B, et al. Does Dual Task Training Improve Walking Performance of Older Adults With Concern of Falling. BMC Geriatr. 2017 09 11;17(1):213. PubMed PMID: 28893187.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does dual task training improve walking performance of older adults with concern of falling? AU - Wollesen,B, AU - Schulz,S, AU - Seydell,L, AU - Delbaere,K, Y1 - 2017/09/11/ PY - 2017/05/12/received PY - 2017/09/06/accepted PY - 2017/9/13/entrez PY - 2017/9/13/pubmed PY - 2018/4/11/medline KW - Accidental falls KW - Fear of falling KW - Gait KW - Physical exercise SP - 213 EP - 213 JF - BMC geriatrics JO - BMC Geriatr VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Older adults with concerns of falling show decrements of gait stability under single (ST) and dual task (DT) conditions. To compare the effects of a DT training integrating task managing strategies for independent living older adults with and without concern about falling (CoF) to a non-training control group on walking performance under ST and DT conditions. METHODS: Single center parallel group single blind randomized controlled trial with group-based interventions (DT-managing balance training) compared to a control group (Ninety-five independent living older adults; 71.5 ± 5.2 years). A progressive DT training (12 sessions; 60 min each; 12 weeks) including task-managing strategies was compared to a non-training control group. SETTING: group based intervention for independent living elderly in a gym. ST and DT walking (visual verbal Stroop task) were measured on a treadmill. Gait parameters (step length, step width, and gait line) and cognitive performance while walking were compared with a 2x2x2 Repeated Measures Analyses of Variance. RESULTS: Participants in the intervention group showed an increased step length under ST and DT conditions following the intervention, for both people with and without CoF compared to their respective control groups. Foot rolling movement and cognitive performance while walking however only improved in participants without CoF. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that DT managing training can improve walking performance under ST and DT conditions in people with and without CoF. Additional treatment to directly address CoF, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, should be considered to further improve the cautious gait pattern (as evidenced by reduced foot rolling movements). TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was retrospectively registered in the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS; Identification number DRKS00012382 , 11.05.2017). SN - 1471-2318 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28893187/Does_dual_task_training_improve_walking_performance_of_older_adults_with_concern_of_falling L2 - https://bmcgeriatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12877-017-0610-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -