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Beyond the dinner table: who's having breakfast, lunch and dinner family meals and which meals are associated with better diet quality and BMI in pre-school children?
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3275-3284.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Having frequent family dinners is associated with better diet quality in children; however, it is unknown whether the frequency of certain family meal types (i.e. dinner) is more strongly associated with better child weight and diet quality compared with other meal types (i.e. breakfast, lunch). Thus, the current study examined the frequency of eating breakfast, lunch or dinner family meals and associations with pre-school children's overall diet quality (HEI-2010) and BMI percentile.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional baseline data (2012-2014) from two randomized controlled childhood obesity prevention trials, NET-Works and GROW, were analysed together.

SETTING

Studies were carried out in community and in-home settings in urban areas of Minnesota and Tennessee, USA.

SUBJECTS

Parent-child (ages 2-5 years) pairs from Minnesota (n 222 non-Hispanics; n 312 Hispanics) and Tennessee (n 545 Hispanics; n 55 non-Hispanics) participated in the study.

RESULTS

Over 80 % of families ate breakfast or lunch family meals at least once per week. Over 65 % of families ate dinner family meals ≥5 times/week. Frequency of breakfast family meals and total weekly family meals were significantly associated with healthier diet quality for non-Hispanic pre-school children (P<0·05), but not for Hispanic children. Family meal frequency by meal type was not associated with BMI percentile for non-Hispanic or Hispanic pre-school children.

CONCLUSIONS

Breakfast family meal frequency and total weekly family meal frequency were associated with healthier diet quality in non-Hispanic pre-school children but not in Hispanic children. Longitudinal research is needed to clarify the association between family meal type and child diet quality and BMI percentile.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Family Medicine and Community Health,University of Minnesota Medical School,Phillips Wangensteen Building,516 Delaware Street SE,Minneapolis,MN 55455,USA.2Department of Nutrition,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,NC,USA.3HealthPartners Institute,Bloomington,MN,USA.4Division of Epidemiology and Community Health,University of Minnesota,Minneapolis,MN,USA.5Division of General Pediatrics,Vanderbilt University Medical Center,Nashville,TN,USA.5Division of General Pediatrics,Vanderbilt University Medical Center,Nashville,TN,USA.6Department of Pediatrics,Stanford University,Stanford,CA,USA.7Department of Pediatrics,University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine,Cleveland,OH,USA.4Division of Epidemiology and Community Health,University of Minnesota,Minneapolis,MN,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28903804

Citation

Berge, Jerica M., et al. "Beyond the Dinner Table: Who's Having Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Family Meals and Which Meals Are Associated With Better Diet Quality and BMI in Pre-school Children?" Public Health Nutrition, vol. 20, no. 18, 2017, pp. 3275-3284.
Berge JM, Truesdale KP, Sherwood NE, et al. Beyond the dinner table: who's having breakfast, lunch and dinner family meals and which meals are associated with better diet quality and BMI in pre-school children? Public Health Nutr. 2017;20(18):3275-3284.
Berge, J. M., Truesdale, K. P., Sherwood, N. E., Mitchell, N., Heerman, W. J., Barkin, S., Matheson, D., Levers-Landis, C. E., & French, S. A. (2017). Beyond the dinner table: who's having breakfast, lunch and dinner family meals and which meals are associated with better diet quality and BMI in pre-school children? Public Health Nutrition, 20(18), 3275-3284. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980017002348
Berge JM, et al. Beyond the Dinner Table: Who's Having Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Family Meals and Which Meals Are Associated With Better Diet Quality and BMI in Pre-school Children. Public Health Nutr. 2017;20(18):3275-3284. PubMed PMID: 28903804.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beyond the dinner table: who's having breakfast, lunch and dinner family meals and which meals are associated with better diet quality and BMI in pre-school children? AU - Berge,Jerica M, AU - Truesdale,Kimberly P, AU - Sherwood,Nancy E, AU - Mitchell,Nathan, AU - Heerman,William J, AU - Barkin,Shari, AU - Matheson,Donna, AU - Levers-Landis,Carolyn E, AU - French,Simone A, Y1 - 2017/09/14/ PY - 2017/9/15/pubmed PY - 2018/7/24/medline PY - 2017/9/15/entrez KW - Breakfast KW - Childhood obesity KW - Diet quality KW - Dinner KW - Family meals KW - Lunch KW - Minority SP - 3275 EP - 3284 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 20 IS - 18 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Having frequent family dinners is associated with better diet quality in children; however, it is unknown whether the frequency of certain family meal types (i.e. dinner) is more strongly associated with better child weight and diet quality compared with other meal types (i.e. breakfast, lunch). Thus, the current study examined the frequency of eating breakfast, lunch or dinner family meals and associations with pre-school children's overall diet quality (HEI-2010) and BMI percentile. DESIGN: Cross-sectional baseline data (2012-2014) from two randomized controlled childhood obesity prevention trials, NET-Works and GROW, were analysed together. SETTING: Studies were carried out in community and in-home settings in urban areas of Minnesota and Tennessee, USA. SUBJECTS: Parent-child (ages 2-5 years) pairs from Minnesota (n 222 non-Hispanics; n 312 Hispanics) and Tennessee (n 545 Hispanics; n 55 non-Hispanics) participated in the study. RESULTS: Over 80 % of families ate breakfast or lunch family meals at least once per week. Over 65 % of families ate dinner family meals ≥5 times/week. Frequency of breakfast family meals and total weekly family meals were significantly associated with healthier diet quality for non-Hispanic pre-school children (P<0·05), but not for Hispanic children. Family meal frequency by meal type was not associated with BMI percentile for non-Hispanic or Hispanic pre-school children. CONCLUSIONS: Breakfast family meal frequency and total weekly family meal frequency were associated with healthier diet quality in non-Hispanic pre-school children but not in Hispanic children. Longitudinal research is needed to clarify the association between family meal type and child diet quality and BMI percentile. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28903804/Beyond_the_dinner_table:_who's_having_breakfast_lunch_and_dinner_family_meals_and_which_meals_are_associated_with_better_diet_quality_and_BMI_in_pre_school_children L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980017002348/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -