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Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx is associated with increased severity during respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children.
Respirology. 2018 02; 23(2):220-227.R

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most significant cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in early life. RSV and other respiratory viruses are known to stimulate substantial outgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the upper airways of young children. However, the clinical significance of interactions between viruses and bacteria is currently unclear. The present study aimed to clarify the effect of viral and bacterial co-detections on disease severity during paediatric ARI.

METHODS

Nasopharyngeal aspirates from children under 2 years of age presenting with ARI to the emergency department were screened by quantitative PCR for 17 respiratory viruses and the bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Associations between pathogen detection and clinical measures of disease severity were investigated.

RESULTS

RSV was the most common virus detected, present in 29 of 58 samples from children with ARI (50%). Detection of S. pneumoniae was significantly more frequent during RSV infections compared to other respiratory viruses (adjusted effect size: 1.8, P: 0.03), and co-detection of both pathogens was associated with higher clinical disease severity scores (adjusted effect size: 1.2, P: 0.03).

CONCLUSION

Co-detection of RSV and S. pneumoniae in the nasopharynx was associated with more severe ARI, suggesting that S. pneumoniae colonization plays a pathogenic role in young children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia.Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia.Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Queensland Paediatric Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Children's Health Queensland, Centre for Children's Health Research, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia.Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Queensland Paediatric Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Children's Health Queensland, Centre for Children's Health Research, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia.School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia.Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28913912

Citation

Brealey, Jaelle C., et al. "Streptococcus Pneumoniae Colonization of the Nasopharynx Is Associated With Increased Severity During Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Young Children." Respirology (Carlton, Vic.), vol. 23, no. 2, 2018, pp. 220-227.
Brealey JC, Chappell KJ, Galbraith S, et al. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx is associated with increased severity during respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children. Respirology. 2018;23(2):220-227.
Brealey, J. C., Chappell, K. J., Galbraith, S., Fantino, E., Gaydon, J., Tozer, S., Young, P. R., Holt, P. G., & Sly, P. D. (2018). Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx is associated with increased severity during respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children. Respirology (Carlton, Vic.), 23(2), 220-227. https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.13179
Brealey JC, et al. Streptococcus Pneumoniae Colonization of the Nasopharynx Is Associated With Increased Severity During Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Young Children. Respirology. 2018;23(2):220-227. PubMed PMID: 28913912.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx is associated with increased severity during respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children. AU - Brealey,Jaelle C, AU - Chappell,Keith J, AU - Galbraith,Sally, AU - Fantino,Emmanuelle, AU - Gaydon,Jane, AU - Tozer,Sarah, AU - Young,Paul R, AU - Holt,Patrick G, AU - Sly,Peter D, Y1 - 2017/09/15/ PY - 2017/03/20/received PY - 2017/06/27/revised PY - 2017/07/19/accepted PY - 2017/9/16/pubmed PY - 2018/10/27/medline PY - 2017/9/16/entrez KW - co-infection KW - human respiratory syncytial virus KW - pneumococcus KW - respiratory tract infection KW - severity of illness index SP - 220 EP - 227 JF - Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) JO - Respirology VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most significant cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in early life. RSV and other respiratory viruses are known to stimulate substantial outgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the upper airways of young children. However, the clinical significance of interactions between viruses and bacteria is currently unclear. The present study aimed to clarify the effect of viral and bacterial co-detections on disease severity during paediatric ARI. METHODS: Nasopharyngeal aspirates from children under 2 years of age presenting with ARI to the emergency department were screened by quantitative PCR for 17 respiratory viruses and the bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Associations between pathogen detection and clinical measures of disease severity were investigated. RESULTS: RSV was the most common virus detected, present in 29 of 58 samples from children with ARI (50%). Detection of S. pneumoniae was significantly more frequent during RSV infections compared to other respiratory viruses (adjusted effect size: 1.8, P: 0.03), and co-detection of both pathogens was associated with higher clinical disease severity scores (adjusted effect size: 1.2, P: 0.03). CONCLUSION: Co-detection of RSV and S. pneumoniae in the nasopharynx was associated with more severe ARI, suggesting that S. pneumoniae colonization plays a pathogenic role in young children. SN - 1440-1843 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28913912/Streptococcus_pneumoniae_colonization_of_the_nasopharynx_is_associated_with_increased_severity_during_respiratory_syncytial_virus_infection_in_young_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.13179 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -