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Effects of Latino children on their mothers' dietary intake and dietary behaviors: The role of children's acculturation and the mother-child acculturation gap.
Soc Sci Med. 2017 10; 191:125-133.SS

Abstract

RATIONALE

Research shows that acculturation is important to Latinas' dietary intake and related behaviors. Although evidence suggests children may also play a role, it remains unclear whether children's acculturation is related to mothers' dietary intake/behaviors.

OBJECTIVES

We examined the relationship between Latino children's acculturation and mothers' dietary intake/behaviors. We also examined the mother-child acculturation gap to identify dyad characteristics associated with mothers' diet.

METHODS

Baseline surveys were collected in 2010 from 314 Latino mother-child (7-13 years old) dyads of Mexican-origin enrolled in a family-based dietary intervention in Southern California, USA. Mother's daily intake of fruits, vegetables, and sugary beverages, percent of calories from fat, weekly away-from-home eating, and percent of weekly grocery dollars spent on fruits and vegetables were assessed via self-report. Mothers' and children's bidimensional acculturation were examined using acculturation groups (e.g., assimilated, bicultural) derived from Hispanic and non-Hispanic dimensions of language. We also assessed the acculturation gap between mothers and children with the a) difference in acculturation between mothers' and children's continuous acculturation scores and b) mother-child acculturation gap typologies (e.g., traditional mothers of assimilated children).

RESULTS

Findings show that having an assimilated versus a bicultural child was negatively associated with mothers' vegetable intake and positively associated with mothers' sugary beverage intake, percent of calories from fat, and frequency of away-from-home eating, regardless of mothers' acculturation. Traditional mothers of assimilated children reported more sugary beverage intake, calories from fat, and more frequent away-from-home eating than traditional mothers of bicultural children.

CONCLUSION

Results suggest that children's acculturation is associated with their mothers' dietary intake/behaviors and traditional mothers of assimilated children require more attention in future research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

San Diego State University (SDSU)/University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Joint Doctoral Program in Public Health (Health Behavior), 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182, USA (SDSU) and 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA (UCSD); Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, 9245 Sky Park Court, Suite 221, San Diego, CA 92123, USA. Electronic address: shsoto@live.unc.edu.Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, 9245 Sky Park Court, Suite 221, San Diego, CA 92123, USA; San Diego State University, College of Health and Human Services, Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182, USA. Electronic address: earredon@mail.sdsu.edu.University of California, San Diego, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, Division of Behavioral Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: bmarcus@ucsd.edu.University of California, San Diego, Department of Medicine, Division of Global Health, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: hshakya@ucsd.edu.San Diego State University, College of Sciences, Department of Psychology, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182, USA. Electronic address: sroesch@mail.sdsu.edu.Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, 9245 Sky Park Court, Suite 221, San Diego, CA 92123, USA; San Diego State University, College of Health and Human Services, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182, USA. Electronic address: ayala@mail.sdsu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28917621

Citation

Soto, Sandra H., et al. "Effects of Latino Children On Their Mothers' Dietary Intake and Dietary Behaviors: the Role of Children's Acculturation and the Mother-child Acculturation Gap." Social Science & Medicine (1982), vol. 191, 2017, pp. 125-133.
Soto SH, Arredondo EM, Marcus B, et al. Effects of Latino children on their mothers' dietary intake and dietary behaviors: The role of children's acculturation and the mother-child acculturation gap. Soc Sci Med. 2017;191:125-133.
Soto, S. H., Arredondo, E. M., Marcus, B., Shakya, H. B., Roesch, S., & Ayala, G. X. (2017). Effects of Latino children on their mothers' dietary intake and dietary behaviors: The role of children's acculturation and the mother-child acculturation gap. Social Science & Medicine (1982), 191, 125-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.09.004
Soto SH, et al. Effects of Latino Children On Their Mothers' Dietary Intake and Dietary Behaviors: the Role of Children's Acculturation and the Mother-child Acculturation Gap. Soc Sci Med. 2017;191:125-133. PubMed PMID: 28917621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of Latino children on their mothers' dietary intake and dietary behaviors: The role of children's acculturation and the mother-child acculturation gap. AU - Soto,Sandra H, AU - Arredondo,Elva M, AU - Marcus,Bess, AU - Shakya,Holly B, AU - Roesch,Scott, AU - Ayala,Guadalupe X, Y1 - 2017/09/05/ PY - 2017/03/17/received PY - 2017/08/24/revised PY - 2017/09/03/accepted PY - 2017/9/18/pubmed PY - 2018/6/12/medline PY - 2017/9/18/entrez KW - Acculturation KW - Children KW - Diet KW - Latinas KW - Mothers SP - 125 EP - 133 JF - Social science & medicine (1982) JO - Soc Sci Med VL - 191 N2 - RATIONALE: Research shows that acculturation is important to Latinas' dietary intake and related behaviors. Although evidence suggests children may also play a role, it remains unclear whether children's acculturation is related to mothers' dietary intake/behaviors. OBJECTIVES: We examined the relationship between Latino children's acculturation and mothers' dietary intake/behaviors. We also examined the mother-child acculturation gap to identify dyad characteristics associated with mothers' diet. METHODS: Baseline surveys were collected in 2010 from 314 Latino mother-child (7-13 years old) dyads of Mexican-origin enrolled in a family-based dietary intervention in Southern California, USA. Mother's daily intake of fruits, vegetables, and sugary beverages, percent of calories from fat, weekly away-from-home eating, and percent of weekly grocery dollars spent on fruits and vegetables were assessed via self-report. Mothers' and children's bidimensional acculturation were examined using acculturation groups (e.g., assimilated, bicultural) derived from Hispanic and non-Hispanic dimensions of language. We also assessed the acculturation gap between mothers and children with the a) difference in acculturation between mothers' and children's continuous acculturation scores and b) mother-child acculturation gap typologies (e.g., traditional mothers of assimilated children). RESULTS: Findings show that having an assimilated versus a bicultural child was negatively associated with mothers' vegetable intake and positively associated with mothers' sugary beverage intake, percent of calories from fat, and frequency of away-from-home eating, regardless of mothers' acculturation. Traditional mothers of assimilated children reported more sugary beverage intake, calories from fat, and more frequent away-from-home eating than traditional mothers of bicultural children. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that children's acculturation is associated with their mothers' dietary intake/behaviors and traditional mothers of assimilated children require more attention in future research. SN - 1873-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28917621/Effects_of_Latino_children_on_their_mothers'_dietary_intake_and_dietary_behaviors:_The_role_of_children's_acculturation_and_the_mother_child_acculturation_gap_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0277-9536(17)30529-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -