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Effects of aerobic exercise on brain metabolism and grey matter volume in older adults: results of the randomised controlled SMART trial.
Transl Psychiatry. 2017 07 18; 7(7):e1172.TP

Abstract

There is mounting evidence that aerobic exercise has a positive effect on cognitive functions in older adults. To date, little is known about the neurometabolic and molecular mechanisms underlying this positive effect. The present study used magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative MRI to systematically explore the effects of physical activity on human brain metabolism and grey matter (GM) volume in healthy aging. This is a randomised controlled assessor-blinded two-armed trial (n=53) to explore exercise-induced neuroprotective and metabolic effects on the brain in cognitively healthy older adults. Participants (age >65) were allocated to a 12-week individualised aerobic exercise programme intervention (n=29) or a 12-week waiting control group (n=24). The main outcomes were the change in cerebral metabolism and its association to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels as well as changes in GM volume. We found that cerebral choline concentrations remained stable after 12 weeks of aerobic exercise in the intervention group, whereas they increased in the waiting control group. No effect of training was seen on cerebral N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations, nor on markers of neuronal energy reserve or BDNF levels. Further, we observed no change in cortical GM volume in response to aerobic exercise. The finding of stable choline concentrations in the intervention group over the 3 month period might indicate a neuroprotective effect of aerobic exercise. Choline might constitute a valid marker for an effect of aerobic exercise on cerebral metabolism in healthy aging.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of General Practice, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sports Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sports Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sports Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Institute of Neuroradiology, Goethe University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Neurobiology and Neurotrophins Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité University Medicine, Berlin, Germany.Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Institute of Neuroradiology, Goethe University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sports Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Institute of General Practice, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sports Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sports Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Institute of General Practice, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28934191

Citation

Matura, S, et al. "Effects of Aerobic Exercise On Brain Metabolism and Grey Matter Volume in Older Adults: Results of the Randomised Controlled SMART Trial." Translational Psychiatry, vol. 7, no. 7, 2017, pp. e1172.
Matura S, Fleckenstein J, Deichmann R, et al. Effects of aerobic exercise on brain metabolism and grey matter volume in older adults: results of the randomised controlled SMART trial. Transl Psychiatry. 2017;7(7):e1172.
Matura, S., Fleckenstein, J., Deichmann, R., Engeroff, T., Füzéki, E., Hattingen, E., Hellweg, R., Lienerth, B., Pilatus, U., Schwarz, S., Tesky, V. A., Vogt, L., Banzer, W., & Pantel, J. (2017). Effects of aerobic exercise on brain metabolism and grey matter volume in older adults: results of the randomised controlled SMART trial. Translational Psychiatry, 7(7), e1172. https://doi.org/10.1038/tp.2017.135
Matura S, et al. Effects of Aerobic Exercise On Brain Metabolism and Grey Matter Volume in Older Adults: Results of the Randomised Controlled SMART Trial. Transl Psychiatry. 2017 07 18;7(7):e1172. PubMed PMID: 28934191.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of aerobic exercise on brain metabolism and grey matter volume in older adults: results of the randomised controlled SMART trial. AU - Matura,S, AU - Fleckenstein,J, AU - Deichmann,R, AU - Engeroff,T, AU - Füzéki,E, AU - Hattingen,E, AU - Hellweg,R, AU - Lienerth,B, AU - Pilatus,U, AU - Schwarz,S, AU - Tesky,V A, AU - Vogt,L, AU - Banzer,W, AU - Pantel,J, Y1 - 2017/07/18/ PY - 2016/12/16/received PY - 2017/04/21/revised PY - 2017/05/08/accepted PY - 2017/9/22/entrez PY - 2017/9/22/pubmed PY - 2018/5/23/medline SP - e1172 EP - e1172 JF - Translational psychiatry JO - Transl Psychiatry VL - 7 IS - 7 N2 - There is mounting evidence that aerobic exercise has a positive effect on cognitive functions in older adults. To date, little is known about the neurometabolic and molecular mechanisms underlying this positive effect. The present study used magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative MRI to systematically explore the effects of physical activity on human brain metabolism and grey matter (GM) volume in healthy aging. This is a randomised controlled assessor-blinded two-armed trial (n=53) to explore exercise-induced neuroprotective and metabolic effects on the brain in cognitively healthy older adults. Participants (age >65) were allocated to a 12-week individualised aerobic exercise programme intervention (n=29) or a 12-week waiting control group (n=24). The main outcomes were the change in cerebral metabolism and its association to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels as well as changes in GM volume. We found that cerebral choline concentrations remained stable after 12 weeks of aerobic exercise in the intervention group, whereas they increased in the waiting control group. No effect of training was seen on cerebral N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations, nor on markers of neuronal energy reserve or BDNF levels. Further, we observed no change in cortical GM volume in response to aerobic exercise. The finding of stable choline concentrations in the intervention group over the 3 month period might indicate a neuroprotective effect of aerobic exercise. Choline might constitute a valid marker for an effect of aerobic exercise on cerebral metabolism in healthy aging. SN - 2158-3188 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28934191/Effects_of_aerobic_exercise_on_brain_metabolism_and_grey_matter_volume_in_older_adults:_results_of_the_randomised_controlled_SMART_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/tp.2017.135 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -