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Urinary BPA and Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: A Repeated Measures Analysis.
Environ Health Perspect. 2017 08 31; 125(8):087026.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In addition to its well-established role in maintaining skeletal health, vitamin D has essential regulatory functions in female reproductive and pregnancy outcomes. Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are endocrine disruptors, and previous research has suggested that these chemical agents may disrupt circulating levels of total 25(OH)D in adults.

OBJECTIVES

We investigated the relationships between repeated measures of urinary phthalate metabolites and BPA and circulating total 25(OH)D in a prospective cohort of pregnant women.

METHODS

The present study population includes participants (n=477) in a nested case-control study of preterm birth drawn from a prospective birth cohort of pregnant women at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Urine and blood samples were collected for biomarker measurements at median 10 wk and 26 wk of gestation.

RESULTS

In repeated measures analysis, we observed that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in urinary mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP) was associated with a 4.48% decrease [95% confidence interval (CI): -7.37, -1.58] in total 25(OH)D. We also detected inverse associations for metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) [percent difference (%Δ)=-2.83 to -2.16]. For BPA, we observed a nonsignificant inverse association with total 25(OH)D in the overall population. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that the associations for some metabolites (e.g., MEHP) varied by race/ethnicity, which may reflect potential differences in susceptibility. In agreement with findings from repeated measures analysis, we reported that DEHP metabolites and BPA were significantly associated with an approximate 20% increase in the odds of vitamin D deficiency (≤20 ng/mL) [odds ratio (95% CI): 1.19 (1.06, 1.35) for molar sum of DEHP metabolites and 1.22 (1.01, 1.47) for BPA] at median 10 wk and 26 wk, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results provide suggestive evidence of the potential for environmental exposure to phthalates and/or BPA to disrupt circulating vitamin D levels in pregnancy. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1178.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health , Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health , Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health , Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences , National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences , National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health , Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28934718

Citation

Johns, Lauren E., et al. "Urinary BPA and Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: a Repeated Measures Analysis." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 125, no. 8, 2017, p. 087026.
Johns LE, Ferguson KK, Cantonwine DE, et al. Urinary BPA and Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: A Repeated Measures Analysis. Environ Health Perspect. 2017;125(8):087026.
Johns, L. E., Ferguson, K. K., Cantonwine, D. E., McElrath, T. F., Mukherjee, B., & Meeker, J. D. (2017). Urinary BPA and Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: A Repeated Measures Analysis. Environmental Health Perspectives, 125(8), 087026. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1178
Johns LE, et al. Urinary BPA and Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: a Repeated Measures Analysis. Environ Health Perspect. 2017 08 31;125(8):087026. PubMed PMID: 28934718.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urinary BPA and Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: A Repeated Measures Analysis. AU - Johns,Lauren E, AU - Ferguson,Kelly K, AU - Cantonwine,David E, AU - McElrath,Thomas F, AU - Mukherjee,Bhramar, AU - Meeker,John D, Y1 - 2017/08/31/ PY - 2016/10/03/received PY - 2017/05/10/revised PY - 2017/05/12/accepted PY - 2017/9/22/entrez PY - 2017/9/22/pubmed PY - 2017/10/20/medline SP - 087026 EP - 087026 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 125 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: In addition to its well-established role in maintaining skeletal health, vitamin D has essential regulatory functions in female reproductive and pregnancy outcomes. Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are endocrine disruptors, and previous research has suggested that these chemical agents may disrupt circulating levels of total 25(OH)D in adults. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationships between repeated measures of urinary phthalate metabolites and BPA and circulating total 25(OH)D in a prospective cohort of pregnant women. METHODS: The present study population includes participants (n=477) in a nested case-control study of preterm birth drawn from a prospective birth cohort of pregnant women at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Urine and blood samples were collected for biomarker measurements at median 10 wk and 26 wk of gestation. RESULTS: In repeated measures analysis, we observed that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in urinary mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP) was associated with a 4.48% decrease [95% confidence interval (CI): -7.37, -1.58] in total 25(OH)D. We also detected inverse associations for metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) [percent difference (%Δ)=-2.83 to -2.16]. For BPA, we observed a nonsignificant inverse association with total 25(OH)D in the overall population. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that the associations for some metabolites (e.g., MEHP) varied by race/ethnicity, which may reflect potential differences in susceptibility. In agreement with findings from repeated measures analysis, we reported that DEHP metabolites and BPA were significantly associated with an approximate 20% increase in the odds of vitamin D deficiency (≤20 ng/mL) [odds ratio (95% CI): 1.19 (1.06, 1.35) for molar sum of DEHP metabolites and 1.22 (1.01, 1.47) for BPA] at median 10 wk and 26 wk, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide suggestive evidence of the potential for environmental exposure to phthalates and/or BPA to disrupt circulating vitamin D levels in pregnancy. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1178. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28934718/Urinary_BPA_and_Phthalate_Metabolite_Concentrations_and_Plasma_Vitamin_D_Levels_in_Pregnant_Women:_A_Repeated_Measures_Analysis_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP1178?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -