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Medicine use practices in management of symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children (≤12 years) in Kampala city, Uganda.
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 21; 17(1):732.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Medicines are commonly accessed and used for management of illness in children without a prescription. This potentially increases the risk of unwanted treatment outcomes. We investigated medicine use practices in management of symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections among children (≤12 years) in households in Nakawa division, Kampala city.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 390 randomly selected children. Data on use of medicines in children (≤12 years) during recent episode of acute upper respiratory tract infection was collected from their care takers using an interviewer administered questionnaire. A recall period of two weeks (14 days) was used in during data collection.

RESULTS

The prevalence of giving children non-prescription antimicrobial medicines was 44.8% (38.3-52.2). The most common disease symptoms that the children reportedly had included flu, 84.9% (331/390), cough, 83.1% (324/390), and undefined fever, 69.7% (272/390). Medicines commonly given to children included, paracetamol 53.1% (207/390), Coartem 29.7% (116/390), cough linctus 20.8% (81/390), amoxicillin 18.9% (74/390), Co-trimoxazole 18.5% (72/390), and diphenhydramine 15.4% (60/390). The major sources of medicines given to the children was hospital/clinic, 57.26% (223/390). Most of the children, 81% were given more than one medicine at a time. The majority, 62.3% (243/390) of the care takers who gave the children medicine during the recent illness were not aware of any medicine (s) that should not be given to children. The predictors of non-prescription use of antimicrobial medicines in managing symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children included, medicines obtained from drug shop (PR: 1.45, CI: 1.14-1.85), medicines at home (PR: 1.8, CI: 0.83-1.198) and type of medicine (antimalarial) (PR: 2.8, CI: 1.17-6.68).

CONCLUSION

Children are commonly given multiple medicines during episodes of acute upper respiratory tract infections with most antimicrobial agents accessed and used without a prescription in Kampala city, Uganda.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda. ocanmoses@gmail.com.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P. O. Box, 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28934933

Citation

Ocan, Moses, et al. "Medicine Use Practices in Management of Symptoms of Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Children (≤12 Years) in Kampala City, Uganda." BMC Public Health, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 732.
Ocan M, Aono M, Bukirwa C, et al. Medicine use practices in management of symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children (≤12 years) in Kampala city, Uganda. BMC Public Health. 2017;17(1):732.
Ocan, M., Aono, M., Bukirwa, C., Luyinda, E., Ochwo, C., Nsambu, E., Namugonza, S., Makoba, J., Kandaruku, E., Muyende, H., & Nakawunde, A. (2017). Medicine use practices in management of symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children (≤12 years) in Kampala city, Uganda. BMC Public Health, 17(1), 732. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4770-1
Ocan M, et al. Medicine Use Practices in Management of Symptoms of Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Children (≤12 Years) in Kampala City, Uganda. BMC Public Health. 2017 09 21;17(1):732. PubMed PMID: 28934933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medicine use practices in management of symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children (≤12 years) in Kampala city, Uganda. AU - Ocan,Moses, AU - Aono,Mary, AU - Bukirwa,Clare, AU - Luyinda,Emmanuel, AU - Ochwo,Cathy, AU - Nsambu,Elastus, AU - Namugonza,Stella, AU - Makoba,Joseph, AU - Kandaruku,Enock, AU - Muyende,Hannington, AU - Nakawunde,Aida, Y1 - 2017/09/21/ PY - 2016/11/17/received PY - 2017/09/18/accepted PY - 2017/9/23/entrez PY - 2017/9/25/pubmed PY - 2018/3/10/medline KW - Antimicrobial agents KW - Kampala KW - Self-medication KW - Upper respiratory tract infections SP - 732 EP - 732 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Medicines are commonly accessed and used for management of illness in children without a prescription. This potentially increases the risk of unwanted treatment outcomes. We investigated medicine use practices in management of symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections among children (≤12 years) in households in Nakawa division, Kampala city. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 390 randomly selected children. Data on use of medicines in children (≤12 years) during recent episode of acute upper respiratory tract infection was collected from their care takers using an interviewer administered questionnaire. A recall period of two weeks (14 days) was used in during data collection. RESULTS: The prevalence of giving children non-prescription antimicrobial medicines was 44.8% (38.3-52.2). The most common disease symptoms that the children reportedly had included flu, 84.9% (331/390), cough, 83.1% (324/390), and undefined fever, 69.7% (272/390). Medicines commonly given to children included, paracetamol 53.1% (207/390), Coartem 29.7% (116/390), cough linctus 20.8% (81/390), amoxicillin 18.9% (74/390), Co-trimoxazole 18.5% (72/390), and diphenhydramine 15.4% (60/390). The major sources of medicines given to the children was hospital/clinic, 57.26% (223/390). Most of the children, 81% were given more than one medicine at a time. The majority, 62.3% (243/390) of the care takers who gave the children medicine during the recent illness were not aware of any medicine (s) that should not be given to children. The predictors of non-prescription use of antimicrobial medicines in managing symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children included, medicines obtained from drug shop (PR: 1.45, CI: 1.14-1.85), medicines at home (PR: 1.8, CI: 0.83-1.198) and type of medicine (antimalarial) (PR: 2.8, CI: 1.17-6.68). CONCLUSION: Children are commonly given multiple medicines during episodes of acute upper respiratory tract infections with most antimicrobial agents accessed and used without a prescription in Kampala city, Uganda. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28934933/Medicine_use_practices_in_management_of_symptoms_of_acute_upper_respiratory_tract_infections_in_children__≤12_years__in_Kampala_city_Uganda_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-017-4770-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -