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Repercussions of eosinophils in a renal allograft - Predictor of early graft loss!
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl. 2017 Sep-Oct; 28(5):1034-1040.SJ

Abstract

We present 5-year experience of renal transplantation (RT) with tissue eosinophilia (TE) in renal allograft biopsy (RAB) and its repercussions on the outcome. In total, 1217 recipients underwent RT from 2011 to 2015, and they were evaluated for the presence of ≥4% TE. Group 1 consisted of RT with RAB showing TE, Group 2 consisted of RT with RAB with rejections without TE, and Group 3 consisted of RT without rejections. Group 1 had 27 recipients, Group 2 had 395, and Group 3 had 795 recipients. The outcome in terms of graft function, patient and graft survival were evaluated and compared between three groups. All recipients received standard triple immunosuppression. One-year patient and death-censored graft survival were 80.7% and 82.7% in Group 1, 87.2% and 95.1% in Group 2, and 92.6% and 99.6%, respectively in Group 3 and corresponding mean serum creatinine (SCr, mg/dL) was 1.60 ± 0.45 in Group 1, 1.63 ± 0.58 in Group 2, and 1.19 ± 0.39 Group three, respectively. Five-year patient and death-censored graft survival were 72.9 % and 71.1% for Group 2 and 87% and 98.2% for Group 3 with SCr of 1.63 ± 0.38 and 1.25 ± 0.4, respectively. Group 1 recipients did not appear at five years. At four years posttransplant, patient and death-censored graft survival were 71.7% and 59.5% in Group 1 with SCr of 1.55 ± 0.65 mg/dL. In conclusion, the presence of eosino-phils in a renal allograft is an impending sign of graft damage and eventual graft loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine, Transfusion Services and Immunohematology; Department of Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine, Transfusion Services and Immunohematology, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine, Transfusion Services and Immunohematology, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine, Transfusion Services and Immunohematology, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine, Transfusion Services and Immunohematology, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.Department of Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine; Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, G. R. Doshi and K. M. Mehta Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center and Dr. H. L. Trivedi Institute of Transplantation Sciences, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad, India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28937060

Citation

Vanikar, Aruna V., et al. "Repercussions of Eosinophils in a Renal Allograft - Predictor of Early Graft Loss!" Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation : an Official Publication of the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Saudi Arabia, vol. 28, no. 5, 2017, pp. 1034-1040.
Vanikar AV, Kanodia KV, Patel RD, et al. Repercussions of eosinophils in a renal allograft - Predictor of early graft loss! Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl. 2017;28(5):1034-1040.
Vanikar, A. V., Kanodia, K. V., Patel, R. D., Suthar, K. S., Nigam, L. A., Thakkar, U. G., Patel, H. V., Kute, V. B., & Trivedi, H. L. (2017). Repercussions of eosinophils in a renal allograft - Predictor of early graft loss! Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation : an Official Publication of the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Saudi Arabia, 28(5), 1034-1040. https://doi.org/10.4103/1319-2442.215146
Vanikar AV, et al. Repercussions of Eosinophils in a Renal Allograft - Predictor of Early Graft Loss. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl. 2017 Sep-Oct;28(5):1034-1040. PubMed PMID: 28937060.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Repercussions of eosinophils in a renal allograft - Predictor of early graft loss! AU - Vanikar,Aruna V, AU - Kanodia,Kamal V, AU - Patel,Rashmi D, AU - Suthar,Kamlesh S, AU - Nigam,Lovelesh A, AU - Thakkar,Umang G, AU - Patel,Himanshu V, AU - Kute,Vivek B, AU - Trivedi,Hargovind L, PY - 2017/9/23/entrez PY - 2017/9/25/pubmed PY - 2019/8/14/medline SP - 1034 EP - 1040 JF - Saudi journal of kidney diseases and transplantation : an official publication of the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Saudi Arabia JO - Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl VL - 28 IS - 5 N2 - We present 5-year experience of renal transplantation (RT) with tissue eosinophilia (TE) in renal allograft biopsy (RAB) and its repercussions on the outcome. In total, 1217 recipients underwent RT from 2011 to 2015, and they were evaluated for the presence of ≥4% TE. Group 1 consisted of RT with RAB showing TE, Group 2 consisted of RT with RAB with rejections without TE, and Group 3 consisted of RT without rejections. Group 1 had 27 recipients, Group 2 had 395, and Group 3 had 795 recipients. The outcome in terms of graft function, patient and graft survival were evaluated and compared between three groups. All recipients received standard triple immunosuppression. One-year patient and death-censored graft survival were 80.7% and 82.7% in Group 1, 87.2% and 95.1% in Group 2, and 92.6% and 99.6%, respectively in Group 3 and corresponding mean serum creatinine (SCr, mg/dL) was 1.60 ± 0.45 in Group 1, 1.63 ± 0.58 in Group 2, and 1.19 ± 0.39 Group three, respectively. Five-year patient and death-censored graft survival were 72.9 % and 71.1% for Group 2 and 87% and 98.2% for Group 3 with SCr of 1.63 ± 0.38 and 1.25 ± 0.4, respectively. Group 1 recipients did not appear at five years. At four years posttransplant, patient and death-censored graft survival were 71.7% and 59.5% in Group 1 with SCr of 1.55 ± 0.65 mg/dL. In conclusion, the presence of eosino-phils in a renal allograft is an impending sign of graft damage and eventual graft loss. SN - 1319-2442 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28937060/Repercussions_of_eosinophils_in_a_renal_allograft___Predictor_of_early_graft_loss L2 - http://www.sjkdt.org/article.asp?issn=1319-2442;year=2017;volume=28;issue=5;spage=1034;epage=1040;aulast=Vanikar DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -