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The global burden of scabies: a cross-sectional analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.
Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 12; 17(12):1247-1254.LI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Numerous population-based studies have documented high prevalence of scabies in overcrowded settings, particularly among children and in tropical regions. We provide an estimate of the global burden of scabies using data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2015.

METHODS

We identified scabies epidemiological data sources from an extensive literature search and hospital insurance data and analysed data sources with a Bayesian meta-regression modelling tool, DisMod-MR 2·1, to yield prevalence estimates. We combined prevalence estimates with a disability weight, measuring disfigurement, itch, and pain caused by scabies, to produce years lived with disability (YLDs). With an assumed zero mortality from scabies, YLDs were equivalent to disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). We estimated DALYs for 195 countries divided into 21 world regions, in both sexes and 20 age groups, between 1990 and 2015.

FINDINGS

Scabies was responsible for 0·21% of DALYs from all conditions studied by GBD 2015 worldwide. The world regions of east Asia (age-standardised DALYs 136·32), southeast Asia (134·57), Oceania (120·34), tropical Latin America (99·94), and south Asia (69·41) had the greatest burden of DALYs from scabies. Mean percent change of DALY rate from 1990 to 2015 was less than 8% in all world regions, except North America, which had a 23·9% increase. The five individual countries with greatest scabies burden were Indonesia (age-standardised DALYs 153·86), China (138·25), Timor-Leste (136·67), Vanuatu (131·59), and Fiji (130·91). The largest standard deviations of age-standardised DALYs between the 20 age groups were observed in southeast Asia (60·1), Oceania (58·3), and east Asia (56·5), with the greatest DALY burdens in children, adolescents, and the elderly.

INTERPRETATION

The burden of scabies is greater in tropical regions, especially in children, adolescents, and elderly people. As a worldwide epidemiological assessment, GBD 2015 provides broad and frequently updated measures of scabies burden in terms of skin effects. These global data might help guide research protocols and prioritisation efforts and focus scabies treatment and control measures.

FUNDING

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: ck2525@caa.columbia.edu.Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.Department of Dermatology, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.Department of Dermatology, Children's National Medical Center, NW Washington DC, USA.Department of Dermatology, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, UK.Centre for International Child Health and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Centre for International Child Health and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Department of Dermatology, St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW, Australia.Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO, USA; Dermatology Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Eastern Colorado Health System, Denver, CO, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28941561

Citation

Karimkhani, Chante, et al. "The Global Burden of Scabies: a Cross-sectional Analysis From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015." The Lancet. Infectious Diseases, vol. 17, no. 12, 2017, pp. 1247-1254.
Karimkhani C, Colombara DV, Drucker AM, et al. The global burden of scabies: a cross-sectional analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Lancet Infect Dis. 2017;17(12):1247-1254.
Karimkhani, C., Colombara, D. V., Drucker, A. M., Norton, S. A., Hay, R., Engelman, D., Steer, A., Whitfeld, M., Naghavi, M., & Dellavalle, R. P. (2017). The global burden of scabies: a cross-sectional analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. Infectious Diseases, 17(12), 1247-1254. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30483-8
Karimkhani C, et al. The Global Burden of Scabies: a Cross-sectional Analysis From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Lancet Infect Dis. 2017;17(12):1247-1254. PubMed PMID: 28941561.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The global burden of scabies: a cross-sectional analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. AU - Karimkhani,Chante, AU - Colombara,Danny V, AU - Drucker,Aaron M, AU - Norton,Scott A, AU - Hay,Roderick, AU - Engelman,Daniel, AU - Steer,Andrew, AU - Whitfeld,Margot, AU - Naghavi,Mohsen, AU - Dellavalle,Robert P, Y1 - 2017/09/21/ PY - 2017/06/01/received PY - 2017/07/20/revised PY - 2017/07/24/accepted PY - 2017/9/25/pubmed PY - 2017/12/8/medline PY - 2017/9/25/entrez SP - 1247 EP - 1254 JF - The Lancet. Infectious diseases JO - Lancet Infect Dis VL - 17 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Numerous population-based studies have documented high prevalence of scabies in overcrowded settings, particularly among children and in tropical regions. We provide an estimate of the global burden of scabies using data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2015. METHODS: We identified scabies epidemiological data sources from an extensive literature search and hospital insurance data and analysed data sources with a Bayesian meta-regression modelling tool, DisMod-MR 2·1, to yield prevalence estimates. We combined prevalence estimates with a disability weight, measuring disfigurement, itch, and pain caused by scabies, to produce years lived with disability (YLDs). With an assumed zero mortality from scabies, YLDs were equivalent to disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). We estimated DALYs for 195 countries divided into 21 world regions, in both sexes and 20 age groups, between 1990 and 2015. FINDINGS: Scabies was responsible for 0·21% of DALYs from all conditions studied by GBD 2015 worldwide. The world regions of east Asia (age-standardised DALYs 136·32), southeast Asia (134·57), Oceania (120·34), tropical Latin America (99·94), and south Asia (69·41) had the greatest burden of DALYs from scabies. Mean percent change of DALY rate from 1990 to 2015 was less than 8% in all world regions, except North America, which had a 23·9% increase. The five individual countries with greatest scabies burden were Indonesia (age-standardised DALYs 153·86), China (138·25), Timor-Leste (136·67), Vanuatu (131·59), and Fiji (130·91). The largest standard deviations of age-standardised DALYs between the 20 age groups were observed in southeast Asia (60·1), Oceania (58·3), and east Asia (56·5), with the greatest DALY burdens in children, adolescents, and the elderly. INTERPRETATION: The burden of scabies is greater in tropical regions, especially in children, adolescents, and elderly people. As a worldwide epidemiological assessment, GBD 2015 provides broad and frequently updated measures of scabies burden in terms of skin effects. These global data might help guide research protocols and prioritisation efforts and focus scabies treatment and control measures. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. SN - 1474-4457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28941561/The_global_burden_of_scabies:_a_cross_sectional_analysis_from_the_Global_Burden_of_Disease_Study_2015_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1473-3099(17)30483-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -