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Insights Into the Ecology of Grapevine red blotch virus in a Diseased Vineyard.
Phytopathology. 2018 Jan; 108(1):94-102.P

Abstract

Limited information is available on the spread of Grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV, genus Grablovirus, family Geminiviridae) in vineyards. To investigate ecological aspects of red blotch disease spread, sticky cards to catch flying insects were placed in 2015 (April to November) and 2016 (March to November) in a vineyard study site in California where disease incidence increased by nearly 20% between 2014 and 2016. Subsets of insect species or taxa were removed from sticky card traps and individual specimens were tested for the presence of GRBV by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. GRBV was consistently detected in Spissistilus festinus (Membracidae), Colladonus reductus (Cicadellidae), Osbornellus borealis (Cicadellidae), and a Melanoliarus sp. (Cixiidae). Populations of these four candidate vectors peaked from June to September, with viruliferous S. festinus peaking from late June to early July in both years. An assessment of co-occurrence and covariation between the spatial distribution of GRBV-infected vines and viruliferous insects identified a significant association only with viruliferous S. festinus. These findings revealed the epidemiological relevance of S. festinus as a vector of GRBV in a vineyard ecosystem. Sequencing coat protein and replicase-associated protein gene fragments of GRBV isolates from newly infected vines and viruliferous vector candidates further suggested secondary spread primarily from local sources and occasionally from background sources.

Authors+Show Affiliations

First, second, and fifth authors: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and third author: Department of Entomology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456; and fourth author: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, 334 Plant Science, Ithaca, NY 14853.First, second, and fifth authors: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and third author: Department of Entomology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456; and fourth author: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, 334 Plant Science, Ithaca, NY 14853.First, second, and fifth authors: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and third author: Department of Entomology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456; and fourth author: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, 334 Plant Science, Ithaca, NY 14853.First, second, and fifth authors: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and third author: Department of Entomology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456; and fourth author: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, 334 Plant Science, Ithaca, NY 14853.First, second, and fifth authors: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and third author: Department of Entomology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456; and fourth author: Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, 334 Plant Science, Ithaca, NY 14853.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28945519

Citation

Cieniewicz, Elizabeth J., et al. "Insights Into the Ecology of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus in a Diseased Vineyard." Phytopathology, vol. 108, no. 1, 2018, pp. 94-102.
Cieniewicz EJ, Pethybridge SJ, Loeb G, et al. Insights Into the Ecology of Grapevine red blotch virus in a Diseased Vineyard. Phytopathology. 2018;108(1):94-102.
Cieniewicz, E. J., Pethybridge, S. J., Loeb, G., Perry, K., & Fuchs, M. (2018). Insights Into the Ecology of Grapevine red blotch virus in a Diseased Vineyard. Phytopathology, 108(1), 94-102. https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-07-17-0239-R
Cieniewicz EJ, et al. Insights Into the Ecology of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus in a Diseased Vineyard. Phytopathology. 2018;108(1):94-102. PubMed PMID: 28945519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Insights Into the Ecology of Grapevine red blotch virus in a Diseased Vineyard. AU - Cieniewicz,Elizabeth J, AU - Pethybridge,Sarah J, AU - Loeb,Gregory, AU - Perry,Keith, AU - Fuchs,Marc, Y1 - 2017/11/17/ PY - 2017/9/26/pubmed PY - 2018/4/20/medline PY - 2017/9/26/entrez KW - spatial analysis SP - 94 EP - 102 JF - Phytopathology JO - Phytopathology VL - 108 IS - 1 N2 - Limited information is available on the spread of Grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV, genus Grablovirus, family Geminiviridae) in vineyards. To investigate ecological aspects of red blotch disease spread, sticky cards to catch flying insects were placed in 2015 (April to November) and 2016 (March to November) in a vineyard study site in California where disease incidence increased by nearly 20% between 2014 and 2016. Subsets of insect species or taxa were removed from sticky card traps and individual specimens were tested for the presence of GRBV by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. GRBV was consistently detected in Spissistilus festinus (Membracidae), Colladonus reductus (Cicadellidae), Osbornellus borealis (Cicadellidae), and a Melanoliarus sp. (Cixiidae). Populations of these four candidate vectors peaked from June to September, with viruliferous S. festinus peaking from late June to early July in both years. An assessment of co-occurrence and covariation between the spatial distribution of GRBV-infected vines and viruliferous insects identified a significant association only with viruliferous S. festinus. These findings revealed the epidemiological relevance of S. festinus as a vector of GRBV in a vineyard ecosystem. Sequencing coat protein and replicase-associated protein gene fragments of GRBV isolates from newly infected vines and viruliferous vector candidates further suggested secondary spread primarily from local sources and occasionally from background sources. SN - 0031-949X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28945519/Insights_Into_the_Ecology_of_Grapevine_red_blotch_virus_in_a_Diseased_Vineyard_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -