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Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS).
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 09 27; 14(10)IJ

Abstract

Where households across income levels shop for food is of central concern within a growing body of research focused on where people live relative to where they shop, what they purchase and eat, and how those choices influence the risk of obesity and chronic disease. We analyzed data from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) using a conditional logit model to determine where participants shop for food to be prepared and eaten at home and how individual and household characteristics of food shoppers interact with store characteristics and distance from home in determining store choice. Store size, whether or not it was a full-service supermarket, and the driving distance from home to the store constituted the three significant main effects on store choice. Overall, participants were more likely to choose larger stores, conventional supermarkets rather than super-centers and other types of stores, and stores closer to home. Interaction effects show that participants receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) were even more likely to choose larger stores. Hispanic participants were more likely than non-Hispanics to choose full-service supermarkets while White participants were more likely to travel further than non-Whites. This study demonstrates the value of explicitly spatial discrete choice models and provides evidence of national trends consistent with previous smaller, local studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Social Policy & Practice, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ahillier@upenn.edu.Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. tesmith@seas.upenn.edu.Department of City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. elizadw@design.upenn.edu.Stanford Prevention Research Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. chrisinger@stanford.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28953221

Citation

Hillier, Amy, et al. "Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS)." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 14, no. 10, 2017.
Hillier A, Smith TE, Whiteman ED, et al. Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS). Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017;14(10).
Hillier, A., Smith, T. E., Whiteman, E. D., & Chrisinger, B. W. (2017). Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(10). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101133
Hillier A, et al. Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS). Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 09 27;14(10) PubMed PMID: 28953221.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS). AU - Hillier,Amy, AU - Smith,Tony E, AU - Whiteman,Eliza D, AU - Chrisinger,Benjamin W, Y1 - 2017/09/27/ PY - 2017/07/01/received PY - 2017/08/08/revised PY - 2017/09/21/accepted PY - 2017/9/28/entrez PY - 2017/9/28/pubmed PY - 2018/3/27/medline KW - FoodAPS KW - discrete choice KW - food retail KW - food shopping KW - supermarkets JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 14 IS - 10 N2 - Where households across income levels shop for food is of central concern within a growing body of research focused on where people live relative to where they shop, what they purchase and eat, and how those choices influence the risk of obesity and chronic disease. We analyzed data from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) using a conditional logit model to determine where participants shop for food to be prepared and eaten at home and how individual and household characteristics of food shoppers interact with store characteristics and distance from home in determining store choice. Store size, whether or not it was a full-service supermarket, and the driving distance from home to the store constituted the three significant main effects on store choice. Overall, participants were more likely to choose larger stores, conventional supermarkets rather than super-centers and other types of stores, and stores closer to home. Interaction effects show that participants receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) were even more likely to choose larger stores. Hispanic participants were more likely than non-Hispanics to choose full-service supermarkets while White participants were more likely to travel further than non-Whites. This study demonstrates the value of explicitly spatial discrete choice models and provides evidence of national trends consistent with previous smaller, local studies. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28953221/Discrete_Choice_Model_of_Food_Store_Trips_Using_National_Household_Food_Acquisition_and_Purchase_Survey__FoodAPS__ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph14101133 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -