Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability.
Res Dev Disabil. 2017 Nov; 70:175-184.RD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and Intellectual Disability (ID) are common co-occurring neurodevelopmental disorders; however, limited research exists regarding the presentation and severity of overlapping symptomology, particularly inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, when a child is diagnosed with one of more of these neurodevelopmental disorders.

AIMS

As difficulties with inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity are symptoms frequently associated with these disorders, the current study aims to determine the differences in the severity of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in children diagnosed with ADHD, ASD, ID, and co-occurring diagnosis of ADHD/ID, ASD/ADHD, and ASD/ID.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Participants in the current study included 113 children between the ages of 6 and 11 who were diagnosed with ADHD, ASD, ID, ADHD/ID, ASD/ADHD, or ASD/ID. Two MANOVA analyses were used to compare these groups witih respsect to symptom (i.e., inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity) severity.

OUTCOMES AND RESULTS

Results indicated that the majority of diagnostic groups experienced elevated levels of both inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. However, results yielded differences in inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity severity. In addition, differences in measure sensitivity across behavioral instruments was found.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

Children with neurodevelopmental disorders often exhibit inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, particularly those with ADHD, ASD, ASD/ADHD, and ADHD/ID; therefore, differential diagnosis may be complicated due to similarities in ADHD symptom severity. However, intellectual abilities may be an important consideration for practitioners in the differential diagnosis process as children with ID and ASD/ID exhibited significantly less inattention and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors. Additionally, the use of multiple behavior rating measures in conjunction with other assessment procedures may help practitioners determine the most appropriate diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Utah State University, Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services, Department of Psychology, 2800 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA. Electronic address: maryellen.mcclainverdoes@usu.edu.Glenwood Autism and Behavioral Health Center, 150 Glenwood Lane, Birmingham, AL, 35242, USA. Electronic address: amills@glenwood.org.University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC), Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities (BCDD) and UTHSC Department of Psychiatry, 711 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105, USA. Electronic address: lmurphy@uthsc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28957735

Citation

McClain, Maryellen Brunson, et al. "Inattention and Hyperactivity/impulsivity Among Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Intellectual Disability." Research in Developmental Disabilities, vol. 70, 2017, pp. 175-184.
McClain MB, Hasty Mills AM, Murphy LE. Inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability. Res Dev Disabil. 2017;70:175-184.
McClain, M. B., Hasty Mills, A. M., & Murphy, L. E. (2017). Inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 70, 175-184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2017.09.009
McClain MB, Hasty Mills AM, Murphy LE. Inattention and Hyperactivity/impulsivity Among Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Intellectual Disability. Res Dev Disabil. 2017;70:175-184. PubMed PMID: 28957735.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability. AU - McClain,Maryellen Brunson, AU - Hasty Mills,Amber M, AU - Murphy,Laura E, Y1 - 2017/09/26/ PY - 2017/02/18/received PY - 2017/08/18/revised PY - 2017/09/15/accepted PY - 2017/9/29/pubmed PY - 2018/6/13/medline PY - 2017/9/29/entrez KW - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder KW - Autism spectrum disorder KW - Co-occurring neurodevelopmental disorders KW - Hyperactivity/impulsivity KW - Inattention KW - Intellectual disability SP - 175 EP - 184 JF - Research in developmental disabilities JO - Res Dev Disabil VL - 70 N2 - BACKGROUND: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and Intellectual Disability (ID) are common co-occurring neurodevelopmental disorders; however, limited research exists regarding the presentation and severity of overlapping symptomology, particularly inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, when a child is diagnosed with one of more of these neurodevelopmental disorders. AIMS: As difficulties with inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity are symptoms frequently associated with these disorders, the current study aims to determine the differences in the severity of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in children diagnosed with ADHD, ASD, ID, and co-occurring diagnosis of ADHD/ID, ASD/ADHD, and ASD/ID. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Participants in the current study included 113 children between the ages of 6 and 11 who were diagnosed with ADHD, ASD, ID, ADHD/ID, ASD/ADHD, or ASD/ID. Two MANOVA analyses were used to compare these groups witih respsect to symptom (i.e., inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity) severity. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: Results indicated that the majority of diagnostic groups experienced elevated levels of both inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. However, results yielded differences in inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity severity. In addition, differences in measure sensitivity across behavioral instruments was found. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Children with neurodevelopmental disorders often exhibit inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, particularly those with ADHD, ASD, ASD/ADHD, and ADHD/ID; therefore, differential diagnosis may be complicated due to similarities in ADHD symptom severity. However, intellectual abilities may be an important consideration for practitioners in the differential diagnosis process as children with ID and ASD/ID exhibited significantly less inattention and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors. Additionally, the use of multiple behavior rating measures in conjunction with other assessment procedures may help practitioners determine the most appropriate diagnosis. SN - 1873-3379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28957735/Inattention_and_hyperactivity/impulsivity_among_children_with_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder_autism_spectrum_disorder_and_intellectual_disability_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0891-4222(17)30232-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -