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Impact of rotavirus vaccine on all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations in Madagascar.
Vaccine. 2018 11 12; 36(47):7198-7204.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Rotavirus vaccine was introduced into the Extended Program on Immunization in Madagascar in May 2014. We analyzed trends in prevalence of all cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalization in children <5years of age before and after vaccine introduction and assessed trend of circulating rotavirus genotypes at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mère Enfant Tsaralalàna (CHU MET).

METHODS

From January 2010 to December 2016, we reviewed the admission logbook to observe the rate of hospitalization caused by gastroenteritis among 19619 children <5years of age admitted at the hospital. In June 2013-December 2016, active rotavirus surveillance was also conducted at CHUMET with support from WHO. Rotavirus antigen was detected by EIA from stool specimen of children who are eligible for rotavirus gastroenteritis surveillance at sentinel site laboratory and rotavirus positive specimens were further genotyped at Regional Reference Laboratory by RT-PCR.

RESULTS

Diarrhea hospitalizations decreased after rotavirus vaccine introduction. The median proportion of annual hospitalizations due to diarrhea was 26% (range: 31-22%) before vaccine introduction; the proportion was 25% the year of vaccine introduction, 17% in 2015 and 16% in 2016. Rotavirus positivity paralleled patterns observed in diarrhea. Before vaccine introduction, 56% of stool specimens tested positive for rotavirus; the percent positive was 13% in 2015, 12% in 2016. Diverse genotypes were detected in the pre-vaccine period; the most common were G3P[8] (n=53; 66%), G2P[4] (n=12; 15%), and G1P[8] (n=11; 14%). 6 distinct genotypes were found in 2015; the most common genotype was G2P[4] (n=10; 67%), the remaining, 5, G12[P8], G3[P8], G1G3[P4], G3G12[P4][P8] and G1G3[NT] had one positive specimen each.

CONCLUSIONS

Following rotavirus vaccine introduction all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus-specific hospitalizations declined dramatically. The most common genotypes detected in the pre-vaccine period were G3P[8] and G2P[4] in 2015, the post vaccine period.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child Health, Teaching Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mère Enfant Tsaralàlana, Antananarivo, Madagascar. Electronic address: v_lalaina@yahoo.fr.Department of Child Health, Teaching Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mère Enfant Tsaralàlana, Antananarivo, Madagascar.Department of Child Health, Teaching Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mère Enfant Tsaralàlana, Antananarivo, Madagascar.Teaching Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Andohatapenaka, Antananarivo, Madagascar.Teaching Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Anosiala, Antananarivo, Madagascar.Department of Child Health, Teaching Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mère Enfant Tsaralàlana, Antananarivo, Madagascar.National Malaria Country Program, Public Health Ministry, Antananarivo, Madagascar.WHO Country, Madagascar.WHO Inter-Country Support Team: East and Southern Africa (WHO IST/ESA), Harare, Zimbabwe.Foundation for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Viral Diseases, Atlanta, USA.World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa (WHO/AFRO), Brazzaville, Congo.Regional Rotavirus Reference Laboratory, SAMRC/Diarrheal Pathogens Research Unit, Department of Virology, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa.Regional Rotavirus Reference Laboratory, SAMRC/Diarrheal Pathogens Research Unit, Department of Virology, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa.Department of Child Health, Teaching Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mère Enfant Tsaralàlana, Antananarivo, Madagascar.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28958809

Citation

Rahajamanana, V L., et al. "Impact of Rotavirus Vaccine On All-cause Diarrhea and Rotavirus Hospitalizations in Madagascar." Vaccine, vol. 36, no. 47, 2018, pp. 7198-7204.
Rahajamanana VL, Raboba JL, Rakotozanany A, et al. Impact of rotavirus vaccine on all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations in Madagascar. Vaccine. 2018;36(47):7198-7204.
Rahajamanana, V. L., Raboba, J. L., Rakotozanany, A., Razafindraibe, N. J., Andriatahirintsoa, E. J. P. R., Razafindrakoto, A. C., Mioramalala, S. A., Razaiarimanga, C., Weldegebriel, G. G., Burnett, E., Mwenda, J. M., Seheri, M., Mphahlele, M. J., & Robinson, A. L. (2018). Impact of rotavirus vaccine on all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations in Madagascar. Vaccine, 36(47), 7198-7204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.08.091
Rahajamanana VL, et al. Impact of Rotavirus Vaccine On All-cause Diarrhea and Rotavirus Hospitalizations in Madagascar. Vaccine. 2018 11 12;36(47):7198-7204. PubMed PMID: 28958809.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of rotavirus vaccine on all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations in Madagascar. AU - Rahajamanana,V L, AU - Raboba,J L, AU - Rakotozanany,A, AU - Razafindraibe,N J, AU - Andriatahirintsoa,E J P R, AU - Razafindrakoto,A C, AU - Mioramalala,S A, AU - Razaiarimanga,C, AU - Weldegebriel,G G, AU - Burnett,E, AU - Mwenda,J M, AU - Seheri,M, AU - Mphahlele,M J, AU - Robinson,A L, Y1 - 2017/09/25/ PY - 2017/06/08/received PY - 2017/08/09/revised PY - 2017/08/16/accepted PY - 2017/9/30/pubmed PY - 2019/2/15/medline PY - 2017/9/30/entrez KW - Genotype KW - Rotavirus KW - Rotavirus vaccine KW - Surveillance SP - 7198 EP - 7204 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 36 IS - 47 N2 - BACKGROUND: Rotavirus vaccine was introduced into the Extended Program on Immunization in Madagascar in May 2014. We analyzed trends in prevalence of all cause diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalization in children <5years of age before and after vaccine introduction and assessed trend of circulating rotavirus genotypes at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mère Enfant Tsaralalàna (CHU MET). METHODS: From January 2010 to December 2016, we reviewed the admission logbook to observe the rate of hospitalization caused by gastroenteritis among 19619 children <5years of age admitted at the hospital. In June 2013-December 2016, active rotavirus surveillance was also conducted at CHUMET with support from WHO. Rotavirus antigen was detected by EIA from stool specimen of children who are eligible for rotavirus gastroenteritis surveillance at sentinel site laboratory and rotavirus positive specimens were further genotyped at Regional Reference Laboratory by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Diarrhea hospitalizations decreased after rotavirus vaccine introduction. The median proportion of annual hospitalizations due to diarrhea was 26% (range: 31-22%) before vaccine introduction; the proportion was 25% the year of vaccine introduction, 17% in 2015 and 16% in 2016. Rotavirus positivity paralleled patterns observed in diarrhea. Before vaccine introduction, 56% of stool specimens tested positive for rotavirus; the percent positive was 13% in 2015, 12% in 2016. Diverse genotypes were detected in the pre-vaccine period; the most common were G3P[8] (n=53; 66%), G2P[4] (n=12; 15%), and G1P[8] (n=11; 14%). 6 distinct genotypes were found in 2015; the most common genotype was G2P[4] (n=10; 67%), the remaining, 5, G12[P8], G3[P8], G1G3[P4], G3G12[P4][P8] and G1G3[NT] had one positive specimen each. CONCLUSIONS: Following rotavirus vaccine introduction all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus-specific hospitalizations declined dramatically. The most common genotypes detected in the pre-vaccine period were G3P[8] and G2P[4] in 2015, the post vaccine period. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28958809/Impact_of_rotavirus_vaccine_on_all_cause_diarrhea_and_rotavirus_hospitalizations_in_Madagascar_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(17)31205-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -