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Parental perceptions of childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Singapore: A cross-sectional survey.
Vaccine. 2017 10 27; 35(45):6096-6102.V

Abstract

PURPOSE

Seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended in children aged 6-59months, but little is known about child vaccination coverage and determinants in Asian settings. We report the results of a survey of knowledge, attitudes, practices, and determinants of child influenza vaccination in Singapore.

METHODS

In December 2015-March 2016, we conducted a survey of 332 parents of children aged 6months to 5years attending pre-schools. We assessed child influenza vaccine coverage and parental knowledge, attitudes, and practices of child influenza vaccination. We used multivariable regression and structural equation models to identify factors associated with child influenza vaccination.

RESULTS

Knowledge about influenza, perceived benefit of vaccination, and willingness to vaccinate were high. However, only 32% of children had ever received influenza vaccine, and only 15% in the past year. Factors independently associated with child influenza vaccination included: being recommended influenza vaccine by a child's doctor (prevalence ratio (PR)=2.47, 95% CI: 1.75-3.48); receiving influenza vaccine information from a private general practitioner (PR=1.47, 95% CI: 1.05-2.04); regularly receiving pre-travel influenza vaccine (PR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.19-2.25); higher willingness to vaccinate (PR=1.58, 95% CI:1.24-2.04 per unit increase in willingness score); and feeling well-informed about influenza vaccine (PR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.04-1.99). Parents who obtained influenza vaccine information from television were less likely to have vaccinated their child (PR=0.44, 95% CI: 0.23-0.85). Path analysis indicated that being recommended vaccination by a child's doctor increased willingness to vaccinate and self-efficacy (feeling well-informed about influenza vaccine). Median willingness-to-pay for a dose of influenza vaccine was SGD30 (interquartile range: SGD20-SGD50), and was higher in parents of vaccinated compared with unvaccinated children (SGD45vs SGD30, p=0.0012).

CONCLUSION

Knowledge and willingness to vaccinate was high in this parent population, but influenza vaccine uptake in children was low. Encouraging medical professionals to recommend vaccination of eligible children is key to improving uptake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, 12 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117549, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, 12 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117549, Singapore.Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, 12 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117549, Singapore; London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: clarence.tam@nus.edu.sg.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28958811

Citation

Low, Mabel S F., et al. "Parental Perceptions of Childhood Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Singapore: a Cross-sectional Survey." Vaccine, vol. 35, no. 45, 2017, pp. 6096-6102.
Low MSF, Tan H, Hartman M, et al. Parental perceptions of childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Singapore: A cross-sectional survey. Vaccine. 2017;35(45):6096-6102.
Low, M. S. F., Tan, H., Hartman, M., Tam, C. C., Hoo, C., Lim, J., Chiow, S., Lee, S., Thng, R., Cai, M., Tan, Y., & Lock, J. (2017). Parental perceptions of childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Singapore: A cross-sectional survey. Vaccine, 35(45), 6096-6102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.09.060
Low MSF, et al. Parental Perceptions of Childhood Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Singapore: a Cross-sectional Survey. Vaccine. 2017 10 27;35(45):6096-6102. PubMed PMID: 28958811.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental perceptions of childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Singapore: A cross-sectional survey. AU - Low,Mabel S F, AU - Tan,Hweeyong, AU - Hartman,Mikael, AU - Tam,Clarence C, AU - Hoo,Cheehow, AU - Lim,Jiaqing, AU - Chiow,Simin, AU - Lee,Simin, AU - Thng,Renzhi, AU - Cai,Mingzhe, AU - Tan,Yanru, AU - Lock,Jingzhan, Y1 - 2017/09/27/ PY - 2017/05/16/received PY - 2017/09/14/revised PY - 2017/09/19/accepted PY - 2017/9/30/pubmed PY - 2018/3/14/medline PY - 2017/9/30/entrez KW - Child health KW - Health survey KW - Influenza KW - Influenza vaccine KW - Vaccination coverage KW - Vaccination policy SP - 6096 EP - 6102 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 35 IS - 45 N2 - PURPOSE: Seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended in children aged 6-59months, but little is known about child vaccination coverage and determinants in Asian settings. We report the results of a survey of knowledge, attitudes, practices, and determinants of child influenza vaccination in Singapore. METHODS: In December 2015-March 2016, we conducted a survey of 332 parents of children aged 6months to 5years attending pre-schools. We assessed child influenza vaccine coverage and parental knowledge, attitudes, and practices of child influenza vaccination. We used multivariable regression and structural equation models to identify factors associated with child influenza vaccination. RESULTS: Knowledge about influenza, perceived benefit of vaccination, and willingness to vaccinate were high. However, only 32% of children had ever received influenza vaccine, and only 15% in the past year. Factors independently associated with child influenza vaccination included: being recommended influenza vaccine by a child's doctor (prevalence ratio (PR)=2.47, 95% CI: 1.75-3.48); receiving influenza vaccine information from a private general practitioner (PR=1.47, 95% CI: 1.05-2.04); regularly receiving pre-travel influenza vaccine (PR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.19-2.25); higher willingness to vaccinate (PR=1.58, 95% CI:1.24-2.04 per unit increase in willingness score); and feeling well-informed about influenza vaccine (PR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.04-1.99). Parents who obtained influenza vaccine information from television were less likely to have vaccinated their child (PR=0.44, 95% CI: 0.23-0.85). Path analysis indicated that being recommended vaccination by a child's doctor increased willingness to vaccinate and self-efficacy (feeling well-informed about influenza vaccine). Median willingness-to-pay for a dose of influenza vaccine was SGD30 (interquartile range: SGD20-SGD50), and was higher in parents of vaccinated compared with unvaccinated children (SGD45vs SGD30, p=0.0012). CONCLUSION: Knowledge and willingness to vaccinate was high in this parent population, but influenza vaccine uptake in children was low. Encouraging medical professionals to recommend vaccination of eligible children is key to improving uptake. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28958811/Parental_perceptions_of_childhood_seasonal_influenza_vaccination_in_Singapore:_A_cross_sectional_survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(17)31308-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -