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Molecular, neuromuscular, and recovery responses to light versus heavy resistance exercise in young men.
Physiol Rep. 2017 Sep; 5(18)PR

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that resistance training with light or heavy loads to failure results in similar adaptations. Herein, we compared how both training modalities affect the molecular, neuromuscular, and recovery responses following exercise. Resistance-trained males (mean ± SE: 22 ± 2 years, 84.8 ± 9.0 kg, 1.79 ± 0.06 m; n = 15) performed a crossover design of four sets of leg extensor exercise at 30% (light RE) or 80% (heavy RE) one repetition maximum (1RM) to repetition failure, and heavy RE or light RE 1 week later. Surface electromyography (EMG) was monitored during exercise, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were collected at baseline (PRE), 15 min (15mPOST), and 90 min following RE (90mPOST) for examination of molecular targets and fiber typing. Isokinetic dynamometry was also performed before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 48 h after (48hPOST) exercise. Dependent variables were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVAs and significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Repetitions completed were greater during light RE (P < 0.01), while EMG amplitude was greater during heavy RE (P ≤ 0.01). POST isokinetic torque was reduced following light versus heavy RE (P < 0.05). Postexercise expression of mRNAs and phosphoproteins associated with muscle hypertrophy were similar between load conditions. Additionally, p70s6k (Thr389) phosphorylation and fast-twitch fiber proportion exhibited a strong relationship after both light and heavy RE (r > 0.5). While similar mRNA and phosphoprotein responses to both modalities occurred, we posit that heavy RE is a more time-efficient training method given the differences in total repetitions completed, lower EMG amplitude during light RE, and impaired recovery response after light RE.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine - Auburn Campus, Auburn, Alabama.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine - Auburn Campus, Auburn, Alabama.Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama mdr0024@auburn.edu. Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine - Auburn Campus, Auburn, Alabama.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28963127

Citation

Haun, Cody T., et al. "Molecular, Neuromuscular, and Recovery Responses to Light Versus Heavy Resistance Exercise in Young Men." Physiological Reports, vol. 5, no. 18, 2017.
Haun CT, Mumford PW, Roberson PA, et al. Molecular, neuromuscular, and recovery responses to light versus heavy resistance exercise in young men. Physiol Rep. 2017;5(18).
Haun, C. T., Mumford, P. W., Roberson, P. A., Romero, M. A., Mobley, C. B., Kephart, W. C., Anderson, R. G., Colquhoun, R. J., Muddle, T. W. D., Luera, M. J., Mackey, C. S., Pascoe, D. D., Young, K. C., Martin, J. S., DeFreitas, J. M., Jenkins, N. D. M., & Roberts, M. D. (2017). Molecular, neuromuscular, and recovery responses to light versus heavy resistance exercise in young men. Physiological Reports, 5(18). https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.13457
Haun CT, et al. Molecular, Neuromuscular, and Recovery Responses to Light Versus Heavy Resistance Exercise in Young Men. Physiol Rep. 2017;5(18) PubMed PMID: 28963127.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Molecular, neuromuscular, and recovery responses to light versus heavy resistance exercise in young men. AU - Haun,Cody T, AU - Mumford,Petey W, AU - Roberson,Paul A, AU - Romero,Matthew A, AU - Mobley,Christopher B, AU - Kephart,Wesley C, AU - Anderson,Richard G, AU - Colquhoun,Ryan J, AU - Muddle,Tyler W D, AU - Luera,Michael J, AU - Mackey,Cameron S, AU - Pascoe,David D, AU - Young,Kaelin C, AU - Martin,Jeffrey S, AU - DeFreitas,Jason M, AU - Jenkins,Nathaniel D M, AU - Roberts,Michael D, Y1 - 2017/09/27/ PY - 2017/07/28/received PY - 2017/08/30/revised PY - 2017/09/04/accepted PY - 2017/10/1/entrez PY - 2017/10/1/pubmed PY - 2018/6/14/medline KW - Electromyography KW - mammalian target of rapamycin KW - postexercise recovery KW - resistance training JF - Physiological reports JO - Physiol Rep VL - 5 IS - 18 N2 - Recent evidence suggests that resistance training with light or heavy loads to failure results in similar adaptations. Herein, we compared how both training modalities affect the molecular, neuromuscular, and recovery responses following exercise. Resistance-trained males (mean ± SE: 22 ± 2 years, 84.8 ± 9.0 kg, 1.79 ± 0.06 m; n = 15) performed a crossover design of four sets of leg extensor exercise at 30% (light RE) or 80% (heavy RE) one repetition maximum (1RM) to repetition failure, and heavy RE or light RE 1 week later. Surface electromyography (EMG) was monitored during exercise, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were collected at baseline (PRE), 15 min (15mPOST), and 90 min following RE (90mPOST) for examination of molecular targets and fiber typing. Isokinetic dynamometry was also performed before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 48 h after (48hPOST) exercise. Dependent variables were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVAs and significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Repetitions completed were greater during light RE (P < 0.01), while EMG amplitude was greater during heavy RE (P ≤ 0.01). POST isokinetic torque was reduced following light versus heavy RE (P < 0.05). Postexercise expression of mRNAs and phosphoproteins associated with muscle hypertrophy were similar between load conditions. Additionally, p70s6k (Thr389) phosphorylation and fast-twitch fiber proportion exhibited a strong relationship after both light and heavy RE (r > 0.5). While similar mRNA and phosphoprotein responses to both modalities occurred, we posit that heavy RE is a more time-efficient training method given the differences in total repetitions completed, lower EMG amplitude during light RE, and impaired recovery response after light RE. SN - 2051-817X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28963127/Molecular_neuromuscular_and_recovery_responses_to_light_versus_heavy_resistance_exercise_in_young_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.13457 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -