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Flexible and stretchable microbial fuel cells with modified conductive and hydrophilic textile.
Biosens Bioelectron. 2018 Feb 15; 100:504-511.BB

Abstract

We built a flexible, stretchable microbial fuel cell (MFC) by laminating two functional components: a bioanode textile with a conductive and hydrophilic polymer coating and a solid-state cathode textile loaded with silver oxide. The textile MFC used Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as a biocatalyst to generate the maximum power and current density of 1.0µW/cm2 and 6.3µA/cm2, respectively, which are comparable with or even higher than other flexible MFCs such as paper-based devices (~ a few µW/cm2). Additionally, the textile MFC generated consistent power even with repeated 70 cycles of 50% stretching. A simple batch fabrication method simultaneously produced 20 individual 2cm × 2cm devices by using brushing, spraying, ironing, and computerized sewing, a process that will revolutionize the mass production of textile MFCs. This achievement is scientifically meaningful because developing textile MFCs requires integration of both electronic and fluidic components into the textile three-dimensionally. This flexible and stretchable energy harvesting device is expected to be easily integrated with the next generation stretchable electronics for realizing low-power, stand-alone, self-sustainable systems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bioelectronics & Microsystems Laboratory, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, State University of New York (SUNY), Binghamton, NY 13902, USA.Bioelectronics & Microsystems Laboratory, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, State University of New York (SUNY), Binghamton, NY 13902, USA.Bioelectronics & Microsystems Laboratory, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, State University of New York (SUNY), Binghamton, NY 13902, USA. Electronic address: sechoi@binghamton.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28972941

Citation

Pang, Sumiao, et al. "Flexible and Stretchable Microbial Fuel Cells With Modified Conductive and Hydrophilic Textile." Biosensors & Bioelectronics, vol. 100, 2018, pp. 504-511.
Pang S, Gao Y, Choi S. Flexible and stretchable microbial fuel cells with modified conductive and hydrophilic textile. Biosens Bioelectron. 2018;100:504-511.
Pang, S., Gao, Y., & Choi, S. (2018). Flexible and stretchable microbial fuel cells with modified conductive and hydrophilic textile. Biosensors & Bioelectronics, 100, 504-511. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2017.09.044
Pang S, Gao Y, Choi S. Flexible and Stretchable Microbial Fuel Cells With Modified Conductive and Hydrophilic Textile. Biosens Bioelectron. 2018 Feb 15;100:504-511. PubMed PMID: 28972941.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Flexible and stretchable microbial fuel cells with modified conductive and hydrophilic textile. AU - Pang,Sumiao, AU - Gao,Yang, AU - Choi,Seokheun, Y1 - 2017/09/28/ PY - 2017/07/17/received PY - 2017/09/25/revised PY - 2017/09/25/accepted PY - 2017/10/4/pubmed PY - 2018/6/26/medline PY - 2017/10/4/entrez KW - Bioelectricity KW - Conductive and hydrophilic textile coating KW - Flexible and stretchable biofuel cells KW - Solid-state cathode KW - Textile-based microbial fuel cells SP - 504 EP - 511 JF - Biosensors & bioelectronics JO - Biosens Bioelectron VL - 100 N2 - We built a flexible, stretchable microbial fuel cell (MFC) by laminating two functional components: a bioanode textile with a conductive and hydrophilic polymer coating and a solid-state cathode textile loaded with silver oxide. The textile MFC used Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as a biocatalyst to generate the maximum power and current density of 1.0µW/cm2 and 6.3µA/cm2, respectively, which are comparable with or even higher than other flexible MFCs such as paper-based devices (~ a few µW/cm2). Additionally, the textile MFC generated consistent power even with repeated 70 cycles of 50% stretching. A simple batch fabrication method simultaneously produced 20 individual 2cm × 2cm devices by using brushing, spraying, ironing, and computerized sewing, a process that will revolutionize the mass production of textile MFCs. This achievement is scientifically meaningful because developing textile MFCs requires integration of both electronic and fluidic components into the textile three-dimensionally. This flexible and stretchable energy harvesting device is expected to be easily integrated with the next generation stretchable electronics for realizing low-power, stand-alone, self-sustainable systems. SN - 1873-4235 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28972941/Flexible_and_stretchable_microbial_fuel_cells_with_modified_conductive_and_hydrophilic_textile_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0956-5663(17)30651-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -