Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Zika beyond the Americas: Travelers as sentinels of Zika virus transmission. A GeoSentinel analysis, 2012 to 2016.
PLoS One. 2017; 12(10):e0185689.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Zika virus (ZIKV) was first isolated in Africa; decades later, caused large outbreaks in the Pacific, and is considered endemic in Asia. We aim to describe ZIKV disease epidemiology outside the Americas, the importance of travelers as sentinels of disease transmission, and discrepancies in travel advisories from major international health organizations.

METHODS AND FINDINGS

This descriptive analysis using GeoSentinel Surveillance Network records involves sixty-four travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries. Ill returned travelers with a confirmed or probable diagnosis of ZIKV disease acquired in Africa, Asia and the Pacific seen between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2016 are included, and the frequencies of demographic, trip, and diagnostic characteristics described. ZIKV was acquired in Asia (18), the Pacific (10) and Africa (1). For five countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Cameroon), GeoSentinel patients were sentinel markers of recent Zika activity. Additionally, the first confirmed ZIKV infection acquired in Kiribati was reported to GeoSentinel (2015), and a probable case was reported from Timor Leste (April 2016), representing the only case known to date. Review of Zika situation updates from major international health authorities for country risk classifications shows heterogeneity in ZIKV country travel advisories.

CONCLUSIONS

Travelers are integral to the global spread of ZIKV, serving as sentinel markers of disease activity. Although GeoSentinel data are collected by specialized clinics and do not capture all imported cases, we show that surveillance of imported infections by returned travelers augments local surveillance system data regarding ZIKV epidemiology and can assist with risk categorization by international authorities. However, travel advisories are variable due to risk uncertainties.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Victorian Infectious Disease Service, Royal Melbourne Hospital at the Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Aix Marseille Université, UM63, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, INSERM 1095, IHU Méditerranée Infection, Marseillle, France.Travel Medicine Center, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.Institute of Infectious Disease & Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.Hawaii Permenente Medical Group, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America.Department of Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.University of Hamburg, Division of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Hamburg, Germany.Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Clinical Sciences, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium.Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Medical Center of the University of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany.Center for Geographic Medicine and Tropical Diseases, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv, Israel. Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.Department of Medicine and Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases and Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, United States of America.University Hospital Center & Inserm 1219, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.James Cook University, Queensland, Australia.CMETE Travel Clinic Paris, Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Begin Military Hospital, Saint-Mandé, France.National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa.Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.Institute for Tropical Diseases, Harbour Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Global Health and Center for Global Health and Development, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28973011

Citation

Leder, Karin, et al. "Zika Beyond the Americas: Travelers as Sentinels of Zika Virus Transmission. a GeoSentinel Analysis, 2012 to 2016." PloS One, vol. 12, no. 10, 2017, pp. e0185689.
Leder K, Grobusch MP, Gautret P, et al. Zika beyond the Americas: Travelers as sentinels of Zika virus transmission. A GeoSentinel analysis, 2012 to 2016. PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0185689.
Leder, K., Grobusch, M. P., Gautret, P., Chen, L. H., Kuhn, S., Lim, P. L., Yates, J., McCarthy, A. E., Rothe, C., Kato, Y., Bottieau, E., Huber, K., Schwartz, E., Stauffer, W., Malvy, D., Shaw, M. T. M., Rapp, C., Blumberg, L., Jensenius, M., ... Hamer, D. H. (2017). Zika beyond the Americas: Travelers as sentinels of Zika virus transmission. A GeoSentinel analysis, 2012 to 2016. PloS One, 12(10), e0185689. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185689
Leder K, et al. Zika Beyond the Americas: Travelers as Sentinels of Zika Virus Transmission. a GeoSentinel Analysis, 2012 to 2016. PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0185689. PubMed PMID: 28973011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Zika beyond the Americas: Travelers as sentinels of Zika virus transmission. A GeoSentinel analysis, 2012 to 2016. AU - Leder,Karin, AU - Grobusch,Martin P, AU - Gautret,Philippe, AU - Chen,Lin H, AU - Kuhn,Susan, AU - Lim,Poh Lian, AU - Yates,Johnnie, AU - McCarthy,Anne E, AU - Rothe,Camilla, AU - Kato,Yasuyuki, AU - Bottieau,Emmanuel, AU - Huber,Kristina, AU - Schwartz,Eli, AU - Stauffer,William, AU - Malvy,Denis, AU - Shaw,Marc T M, AU - Rapp,Christophe, AU - Blumberg,Lucille, AU - Jensenius,Mogens, AU - van Genderen,Perry J J, AU - Hamer,Davidson H, AU - ,, Y1 - 2017/10/03/ PY - 2017/05/26/received PY - 2017/09/18/accepted PY - 2017/10/4/entrez PY - 2017/10/4/pubmed PY - 2017/11/1/medline SP - e0185689 EP - e0185689 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 12 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Zika virus (ZIKV) was first isolated in Africa; decades later, caused large outbreaks in the Pacific, and is considered endemic in Asia. We aim to describe ZIKV disease epidemiology outside the Americas, the importance of travelers as sentinels of disease transmission, and discrepancies in travel advisories from major international health organizations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This descriptive analysis using GeoSentinel Surveillance Network records involves sixty-four travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries. Ill returned travelers with a confirmed or probable diagnosis of ZIKV disease acquired in Africa, Asia and the Pacific seen between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2016 are included, and the frequencies of demographic, trip, and diagnostic characteristics described. ZIKV was acquired in Asia (18), the Pacific (10) and Africa (1). For five countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Cameroon), GeoSentinel patients were sentinel markers of recent Zika activity. Additionally, the first confirmed ZIKV infection acquired in Kiribati was reported to GeoSentinel (2015), and a probable case was reported from Timor Leste (April 2016), representing the only case known to date. Review of Zika situation updates from major international health authorities for country risk classifications shows heterogeneity in ZIKV country travel advisories. CONCLUSIONS: Travelers are integral to the global spread of ZIKV, serving as sentinel markers of disease activity. Although GeoSentinel data are collected by specialized clinics and do not capture all imported cases, we show that surveillance of imported infections by returned travelers augments local surveillance system data regarding ZIKV epidemiology and can assist with risk categorization by international authorities. However, travel advisories are variable due to risk uncertainties. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28973011/Zika_beyond_the_Americas:_Travelers_as_sentinels_of_Zika_virus_transmission__A_GeoSentinel_analysis_2012_to_2016_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185689 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -