Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings From the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2017 10 05; 48(4):249-259.LS

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to compare change in emergent literacy skills of preschool children with and without hearing loss over a 6-month period.

Method

Participants included 19 children with hearing loss and 14 children with normal hearing. Children with hearing loss used amplification and spoken language. Participants completed measures of oral language, phonological processing, and print knowledge twice at a 6-month interval. A series of repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to compare change across groups.

Results

Main effects of time were observed for all variables except phonological recoding. Main effects of group were observed for vocabulary, morphosyntax, phonological memory, and concepts of print. Interaction effects were observed for phonological awareness and concepts of print.

Conclusions

Children with hearing loss performed more poorly than children with normal hearing on measures of oral language, phonological memory, and conceptual print knowledge. Two interaction effects were present. For phonological awareness and concepts of print, children with hearing loss demonstrated less positive change than children with normal hearing. Although children with hearing loss generally demonstrated a positive growth in emergent literacy skills, their initial performance was lower than that of children with normal hearing, and rates of change were not sufficient to catch up to the peers over time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28973172

Citation

Werfel, Krystal L.. "Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings From the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study." Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, vol. 48, no. 4, 2017, pp. 249-259.
Werfel KL. Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings From the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study. Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2017;48(4):249-259.
Werfel, K. L. (2017). Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings From the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 48(4), 249-259. https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0023
Werfel KL. Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings From the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study. Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2017 10 5;48(4):249-259. PubMed PMID: 28973172.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings From the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study. A1 - Werfel,Krystal L, PY - 2017/02/17/received PY - 2017/07/19/accepted PY - 2017/10/4/pubmed PY - 2018/4/28/medline PY - 2017/10/4/entrez SP - 249 EP - 259 JF - Language, speech, and hearing services in schools JO - Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch VL - 48 IS - 4 N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare change in emergent literacy skills of preschool children with and without hearing loss over a 6-month period. Method: Participants included 19 children with hearing loss and 14 children with normal hearing. Children with hearing loss used amplification and spoken language. Participants completed measures of oral language, phonological processing, and print knowledge twice at a 6-month interval. A series of repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to compare change across groups. Results: Main effects of time were observed for all variables except phonological recoding. Main effects of group were observed for vocabulary, morphosyntax, phonological memory, and concepts of print. Interaction effects were observed for phonological awareness and concepts of print. Conclusions: Children with hearing loss performed more poorly than children with normal hearing on measures of oral language, phonological memory, and conceptual print knowledge. Two interaction effects were present. For phonological awareness and concepts of print, children with hearing loss demonstrated less positive change than children with normal hearing. Although children with hearing loss generally demonstrated a positive growth in emergent literacy skills, their initial performance was lower than that of children with normal hearing, and rates of change were not sufficient to catch up to the peers over time. SN - 1558-9129 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28973172/Emergent_Literacy_Skills_in_Preschool_Children_With_Hearing_Loss_Who_Use_Spoken_Language:_Initial_Findings_From_the_Early_Language_and_Literacy_Acquisition__ELLA__Study_ L2 - https://pubs.asha.org/doi/full/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0023?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -