Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

HIV Status Disclosure Among Postpartum Women in Zambia with Varied Intimate Partner Violence Experiences.
AIDS Behav. 2018 05; 22(5):1652-1661.AB

Abstract

HIV-positive pregnant and postpartum women's status disclosure to male sexual partners is associated with improved HIV and maternal and child health outcomes. Yet, status disclosure remains a challenge for many women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly those who are fearful of violence. The objective of the present study is to advance the current understanding of the relationship between intimate partner violence against women and their HIV status disclosure behaviors. We specifically evaluate how the severity, frequency, and type of violence against postpartum HIV-positive women affect status disclosure within married/cohabiting couples. A cross-sectional survey was administered by trained local research assistants to 320 HIV-positive postpartum women attending a large public health center for pediatric immunizations in Lusaka, Zambia. Survey data captured women's self-reports of various forms of intimate partner violence and whether they disclosed their HIV status to the current male partner. Multiple logistic regression models determined the odds of status disclosure by the severity, frequency, and type of violence women experienced. Our findings indicate a negative dose-response relationship between the severity and frequency of intimate partner violence and status disclosure to male partners. Physical violence has a more pronounced affect on status disclosure than sexual or emotional violence. Safe options for women living with HIV who experience intimate partner violence, particularly severe and frequent physical violence, are urgently needed. This includes HIV counselors' ability to evaluate the pros and cons of status disclosure among women and support some women's decisions not to disclose.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. Karen.hampanda@ucdenver.edu. Center for Global Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 13199 East Montview Blvd., Ste. 310, Mail stop A090, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. Karen.hampanda@ucdenver.edu.Division of Gender, Sexuality and Health, HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28975510

Citation

Hampanda, Karen M., and Christine Tagliaferri Rael. "HIV Status Disclosure Among Postpartum Women in Zambia With Varied Intimate Partner Violence Experiences." AIDS and Behavior, vol. 22, no. 5, 2018, pp. 1652-1661.
Hampanda KM, Rael CT. HIV Status Disclosure Among Postpartum Women in Zambia with Varied Intimate Partner Violence Experiences. AIDS Behav. 2018;22(5):1652-1661.
Hampanda, K. M., & Rael, C. T. (2018). HIV Status Disclosure Among Postpartum Women in Zambia with Varied Intimate Partner Violence Experiences. AIDS and Behavior, 22(5), 1652-1661. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-017-1909-0
Hampanda KM, Rael CT. HIV Status Disclosure Among Postpartum Women in Zambia With Varied Intimate Partner Violence Experiences. AIDS Behav. 2018;22(5):1652-1661. PubMed PMID: 28975510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HIV Status Disclosure Among Postpartum Women in Zambia with Varied Intimate Partner Violence Experiences. AU - Hampanda,Karen M, AU - Rael,Christine Tagliaferri, PY - 2017/10/5/pubmed PY - 2019/6/8/medline PY - 2017/10/5/entrez KW - Couples affected by HIV KW - HIV status disclosure KW - Intimate partner violence KW - Sub-Saharan Africa KW - Zambia SP - 1652 EP - 1661 JF - AIDS and behavior JO - AIDS Behav VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - HIV-positive pregnant and postpartum women's status disclosure to male sexual partners is associated with improved HIV and maternal and child health outcomes. Yet, status disclosure remains a challenge for many women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly those who are fearful of violence. The objective of the present study is to advance the current understanding of the relationship between intimate partner violence against women and their HIV status disclosure behaviors. We specifically evaluate how the severity, frequency, and type of violence against postpartum HIV-positive women affect status disclosure within married/cohabiting couples. A cross-sectional survey was administered by trained local research assistants to 320 HIV-positive postpartum women attending a large public health center for pediatric immunizations in Lusaka, Zambia. Survey data captured women's self-reports of various forms of intimate partner violence and whether they disclosed their HIV status to the current male partner. Multiple logistic regression models determined the odds of status disclosure by the severity, frequency, and type of violence women experienced. Our findings indicate a negative dose-response relationship between the severity and frequency of intimate partner violence and status disclosure to male partners. Physical violence has a more pronounced affect on status disclosure than sexual or emotional violence. Safe options for women living with HIV who experience intimate partner violence, particularly severe and frequent physical violence, are urgently needed. This includes HIV counselors' ability to evaluate the pros and cons of status disclosure among women and support some women's decisions not to disclose. SN - 1573-3254 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28975510/HIV_Status_Disclosure_Among_Postpartum_Women_in_Zambia_with_Varied_Intimate_Partner_Violence_Experiences_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-017-1909-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -