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Exploring nursing staff views of responsive behaviours of people with dementia in long-stay facilities.
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2018 Feb; 25(1):26-36.JP

Abstract

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Caring for people with dementia and responsive behaviours is challenging; however, little is known of nurses' experiences of responsive behaviours. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: To demonstrate understanding nurses need to be aware of their own actions, thoughts, attitudes and reactions. Time, education and management support are essential in enabling a person-centred approach. A decision regarding the place of care is difficult to come to, and given the drive to a person-centred approach, there is a need to consider the views of people with dementia. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Nursing staff supporting people with dementia should engage more frequently in reflective practice, ongoing education and decision-making. Service providers/managers need to have an understanding of the complexities of caring for a person with dementia and responsive behaviours and provide their staff with relevant supports and education that is accessible to all staff.

ABSTRACT

Introduction Caring for people with dementia and responsive behaviours can challenge nurses, and little is known of their experiences. Aims To explore nurses' views of supporting people with dementia and responsive behaviours in long-stay facilities. Methods A qualitative descriptive study utilizing in-depth audio-recorded interviews of nine nurses, recruited from private and public care facilities. Qualitative content analyses conducted involving iterative comparisons of transcripts, summaries and memos, where coding, key quotes and tables were developed to determine themes. Results Four themes emerged: recognizing and understanding responsive behaviour, resources and interventions to support people with dementia and responsive behaviour, the impact of education on nursing practice and the care environment. Discussion Availability of staff, adequate time and financial restraints hinder nurses' ability to provide care. Access to ongoing education and being able to provide one-to-one care was valued as dementia-specific education changed nursing practice. Implications for practice Place of care was seen as dependent on the type of responsive behaviour in question, the duration of the behaviour and the impact of the behaviour on the person, other residents and staff. Dementia education needs to be accessible to all staff, and a collaborative approach is necessary in order to develop management guidelines and support strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Service Executive, Kilkenny, Ireland.Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28981190

Citation

Clifford, C, and O Doody. "Exploring Nursing Staff Views of Responsive Behaviours of People With Dementia in Long-stay Facilities." Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, vol. 25, no. 1, 2018, pp. 26-36.
Clifford C, Doody O. Exploring nursing staff views of responsive behaviours of people with dementia in long-stay facilities. J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2018;25(1):26-36.
Clifford, C., & Doody, O. (2018). Exploring nursing staff views of responsive behaviours of people with dementia in long-stay facilities. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 25(1), 26-36. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12436
Clifford C, Doody O. Exploring Nursing Staff Views of Responsive Behaviours of People With Dementia in Long-stay Facilities. J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2018;25(1):26-36. PubMed PMID: 28981190.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exploring nursing staff views of responsive behaviours of people with dementia in long-stay facilities. AU - Clifford,C, AU - Doody,O, Y1 - 2017/10/26/ PY - 2017/09/29/accepted PY - 2017/10/6/pubmed PY - 2018/8/1/medline PY - 2017/10/6/entrez KW - dementia KW - nurses’ views KW - older person KW - person-centred KW - responsive behaviour SP - 26 EP - 36 JF - Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing JO - J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - : WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Caring for people with dementia and responsive behaviours is challenging; however, little is known of nurses' experiences of responsive behaviours. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: To demonstrate understanding nurses need to be aware of their own actions, thoughts, attitudes and reactions. Time, education and management support are essential in enabling a person-centred approach. A decision regarding the place of care is difficult to come to, and given the drive to a person-centred approach, there is a need to consider the views of people with dementia. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Nursing staff supporting people with dementia should engage more frequently in reflective practice, ongoing education and decision-making. Service providers/managers need to have an understanding of the complexities of caring for a person with dementia and responsive behaviours and provide their staff with relevant supports and education that is accessible to all staff. ABSTRACT: Introduction Caring for people with dementia and responsive behaviours can challenge nurses, and little is known of their experiences. Aims To explore nurses' views of supporting people with dementia and responsive behaviours in long-stay facilities. Methods A qualitative descriptive study utilizing in-depth audio-recorded interviews of nine nurses, recruited from private and public care facilities. Qualitative content analyses conducted involving iterative comparisons of transcripts, summaries and memos, where coding, key quotes and tables were developed to determine themes. Results Four themes emerged: recognizing and understanding responsive behaviour, resources and interventions to support people with dementia and responsive behaviour, the impact of education on nursing practice and the care environment. Discussion Availability of staff, adequate time and financial restraints hinder nurses' ability to provide care. Access to ongoing education and being able to provide one-to-one care was valued as dementia-specific education changed nursing practice. Implications for practice Place of care was seen as dependent on the type of responsive behaviour in question, the duration of the behaviour and the impact of the behaviour on the person, other residents and staff. Dementia education needs to be accessible to all staff, and a collaborative approach is necessary in order to develop management guidelines and support strategies. SN - 1365-2850 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28981190/Exploring_nursing_staff_views_of_responsive_behaviours_of_people_with_dementia_in_long_stay_facilities_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12436 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -