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Contemporary Commercial Music Singing Students-Voice Quality and Vocal Function at the Beginning of Singing Training.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to assess the voice quality and the vocal tract function in popular singing students at the beginning of their singing training at the High School of Music.

DESIGN

This is a retrospective cross-sectional study.

METHODS

The study consisted of 45 popular singing students (35 females and 10 males, mean age: 19.9 ± 2.8 years). They were assessed in the first 2 months of their 4-year singing training at the High School of Music, between 2013 and 2016. Voice quality and vocal tract function were evaluated using videolaryngostroboscopy, palpation of the vocal tract structures, the perceptual speaking and singing voice assessment, acoustic analysis, maximal phonation time, the Voice Handicap Index, and the Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI).

RESULTS

Twenty-two percent of Contemporary Commercial Music singing students began their education in the High School, with vocal nodules. Palpation of the vocal tract structure showed in 50% correct motions and tension in speaking and in 39.3% in singing. Perceptual voice assessment showed in 80% proper speaking voice quality and in 82.4% proper singing voice quality. The mean vocal fundamental frequency while speaking in females was 214 Hz and in males was 116 Hz. Dysphonia Severity Index was at the level of 2, and maximum phonation time was 17.7 seconds. The Voice Handicap Index and the SVHI remained within the normal range: 7.5 and 19, respectively. Perceptual singing voice assessment correlated with the SVHI (P = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS

Twenty-two percent of the Contemporary Commercial Music singing students began their education in the High School, with organic vocal fold lesions.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warszawa, Poland.

    ,

    Department of Biophysics and Human Physiology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warszawa, Poland. Electronic address: maria.sobol@wum.edu.pl.

    ,

    Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warszawa, Poland.

    Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warszawa, Poland.

    Source

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28986153