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Urinary level of triclosan in a population of Chinese pregnant women and its association with birth outcomes.
Environ Pollut. 2018 Feb; 233:872-879.EP

Abstract

Triclosan (TCS) is a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical which is widely used in consumer products as an antibacterial agent. But findings in human studies focusing on the fetal developmental effects of prenatal TCS exposure were rare and inconsistent. This study aimed to determine maternal urinary TCS and investigate its association with birth outcomes. Pregnant women (n = 1006) were randomly selected from the prospective Healthy Baby Cohort (HBC) enrolled in 2014. TCS levels were determined in maternal urine samples collected at delivery and recorded birth outcomes were obtained from the medical records. Multiple linear regressions were applied to evaluate associations of maternal urinary TCS levels with birth outcomes including birth weight, birth length, and gestational age. Logistic regressions were used to evaluate associations with preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight. The geometric mean concentrations for TCS and specific gravity (SG) adjusted TCS in maternal urines were 0.73, 0.78 ng/mL, respectively. In the crude model, one ln-unit increase of urinary SG-adjusted TCS concentration was associated with a 0.30-day [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.00, 0.60] increase in gestational age; however, the associations were not statistically significant after adjustment for covariates. No significant associations of SG-adjusted TCS concentrations with birth weight and birth length were observed. Maternal SG-adjusted TCS concentrations were not related to preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight (all p > 0.10). Our findings reported a relatively low level of TCS among Chinese pregnant women. With such exposure level, we did not find strong evidence for associations between maternal TCS exposure and birth outcomes. Longitudinal studies concerning about different potential effects of TCS on perinatal health are necessary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Women and Children Medical and Healthcare Center of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.CDC of Yangtze River Administration and Navigational Affairs, General Hospital of the Yangtze River Shipping, Wuhan, People's Republic of China.Women and Children Medical and Healthcare Center of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, College for Public Health & Social Justice, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.Women and Children Medical and Healthcare Center of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: liyuanyuan@hust.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28987566

Citation

Huo, Wenqian, et al. "Urinary Level of Triclosan in a Population of Chinese Pregnant Women and Its Association With Birth Outcomes." Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), vol. 233, 2018, pp. 872-879.
Huo W, Xia W, Wu C, et al. Urinary level of triclosan in a population of Chinese pregnant women and its association with birth outcomes. Environ Pollut. 2018;233:872-879.
Huo, W., Xia, W., Wu, C., Zhu, Y., Zhang, B., Wan, Y., Zhou, A., Qian, Z., Chen, Z., Jiang, Y., Liu, H., Hu, J., Xu, B., Xu, S., & Li, Y. (2018). Urinary level of triclosan in a population of Chinese pregnant women and its association with birth outcomes. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 233, 872-879. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.08.073
Huo W, et al. Urinary Level of Triclosan in a Population of Chinese Pregnant Women and Its Association With Birth Outcomes. Environ Pollut. 2018;233:872-879. PubMed PMID: 28987566.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urinary level of triclosan in a population of Chinese pregnant women and its association with birth outcomes. AU - Huo,Wenqian, AU - Xia,Wei, AU - Wu,Chuansha, AU - Zhu,Yingshuang, AU - Zhang,Bin, AU - Wan,Yanjian, AU - Zhou,Aifen, AU - Qian,Zhenming, AU - Chen,Zhong, AU - Jiang,Yangqian, AU - Liu,Hongxiu, AU - Hu,Jie, AU - Xu,Bing, AU - Xu,Shunqing, AU - Li,Yuanyuan, Y1 - 2017/10/04/ PY - 2016/09/30/received PY - 2017/08/17/revised PY - 2017/08/18/accepted PY - 2017/10/11/pubmed PY - 2018/4/7/medline PY - 2017/10/9/entrez KW - Birth outcomes KW - Gestational age KW - Pregnancy KW - Triclosan KW - Urine SP - 872 EP - 879 JF - Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) JO - Environ. Pollut. VL - 233 N2 - Triclosan (TCS) is a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical which is widely used in consumer products as an antibacterial agent. But findings in human studies focusing on the fetal developmental effects of prenatal TCS exposure were rare and inconsistent. This study aimed to determine maternal urinary TCS and investigate its association with birth outcomes. Pregnant women (n = 1006) were randomly selected from the prospective Healthy Baby Cohort (HBC) enrolled in 2014. TCS levels were determined in maternal urine samples collected at delivery and recorded birth outcomes were obtained from the medical records. Multiple linear regressions were applied to evaluate associations of maternal urinary TCS levels with birth outcomes including birth weight, birth length, and gestational age. Logistic regressions were used to evaluate associations with preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight. The geometric mean concentrations for TCS and specific gravity (SG) adjusted TCS in maternal urines were 0.73, 0.78 ng/mL, respectively. In the crude model, one ln-unit increase of urinary SG-adjusted TCS concentration was associated with a 0.30-day [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.00, 0.60] increase in gestational age; however, the associations were not statistically significant after adjustment for covariates. No significant associations of SG-adjusted TCS concentrations with birth weight and birth length were observed. Maternal SG-adjusted TCS concentrations were not related to preterm birth, late term birth, and low birth weight (all p > 0.10). Our findings reported a relatively low level of TCS among Chinese pregnant women. With such exposure level, we did not find strong evidence for associations between maternal TCS exposure and birth outcomes. Longitudinal studies concerning about different potential effects of TCS on perinatal health are necessary. SN - 1873-6424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28987566/Urinary_level_of_triclosan_in_a_population_of_Chinese_pregnant_women_and_its_association_with_birth_outcomes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0269-7491(16)31554-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -