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Associations of dietary patterns with bone mass, muscle strength and balance in a cohort of Australian middle-aged women.
Br J Nutr. 2017 Oct; 118(8):598-606.BJ

Abstract

Influences of dietary patterns on musculoskeletal health are poorly understood in middle-aged women. This cross-sectional analysis from a cohort of 347 women (aged 36-57 years) aimed to examine associations between dietary patterns and musculoskeletal health outcomes in middle-aged women. Diet was measured by the Cancer Council of Victoria FFQ. Total body bone mineral content (TB BMC), femoral neck and lumbar spine bone density (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), lower limbs muscle strength (LMS) and balance tests (timed up and go test, step test, functional reach test (FRT) and lateral reach test) were also measured. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns and scores for each pattern generated using factor loadings with absolute values ≥0·20. Associations between food pattern scores and musculoskeletal outcomes were assessed using multivariable linear regression. Three dietary patterns were identified: 'Healthy' (high consumption of a plant-based diet - vegetables, legumes, fruit, tomatoes, nuts, snacks, garlic, whole grains and low intake of high-fat dairy products), 'high protein, high fat' (red meats, poultry, processed meats, potatoes, cruciferous and dark-yellow vegetables, fish, chips, spirits and high-fat dairy products) and 'Processed foods' (high intakes of meat pies, hamburgers, beer, sweets, fruit juice, processed meats, snacks, spirits, pizza and low intake of cruciferous vegetables). After adjustment for confounders, Healthy pattern was positively associated with LMS, whereas Processed foods pattern was inversely associated with TB BMC and FRT. The associations were not significant after accounting for multiple comparisons. There were no associations with any other outcomes. These results suggest that maintaining a healthy diet could contribute to bone acquisition, muscle strength and balance in adult life. However, while they provide some support for further investigating dietary strategies for prevention of age-related loss of muscle and deterioration in balance, the exploratory nature of the analyses means that confirmation in longitudinal studies and/or trials with pre-specified hypotheses is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Menzies Institute for Medical Research,University of Tasmania,17 Liverpool Street, Hobart, TAS 7000,Australia.1Menzies Institute for Medical Research,University of Tasmania,17 Liverpool Street, Hobart, TAS 7000,Australia.1Menzies Institute for Medical Research,University of Tasmania,17 Liverpool Street, Hobart, TAS 7000,Australia.2School of Population and Global Health,University of Melbourne,235 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3053,Australia.1Menzies Institute for Medical Research,University of Tasmania,17 Liverpool Street, Hobart, TAS 7000,Australia.1Menzies Institute for Medical Research,University of Tasmania,17 Liverpool Street, Hobart, TAS 7000,Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28990541

Citation

Wu, Feitong, et al. "Associations of Dietary Patterns With Bone Mass, Muscle Strength and Balance in a Cohort of Australian Middle-aged Women." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 118, no. 8, 2017, pp. 598-606.
Wu F, Wills K, Laslett LL, et al. Associations of dietary patterns with bone mass, muscle strength and balance in a cohort of Australian middle-aged women. Br J Nutr. 2017;118(8):598-606.
Wu, F., Wills, K., Laslett, L. L., Oldenburg, B., Jones, G., & Winzenberg, T. (2017). Associations of dietary patterns with bone mass, muscle strength and balance in a cohort of Australian middle-aged women. The British Journal of Nutrition, 118(8), 598-606. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114517002483
Wu F, et al. Associations of Dietary Patterns With Bone Mass, Muscle Strength and Balance in a Cohort of Australian Middle-aged Women. Br J Nutr. 2017;118(8):598-606. PubMed PMID: 28990541.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of dietary patterns with bone mass, muscle strength and balance in a cohort of Australian middle-aged women. AU - Wu,Feitong, AU - Wills,Karen, AU - Laslett,Laura L, AU - Oldenburg,Brian, AU - Jones,Graeme, AU - Winzenberg,Tania, Y1 - 2017/10/09/ PY - 2017/10/11/pubmed PY - 2017/10/31/medline PY - 2017/10/10/entrez KW - FRT functional reach test KW - LMS limb muscle strength KW - TB BMC total body bone mineral content KW - Balance KW - Bone mass KW - Dietary patterns KW - Middle-aged women KW - Muscle strength SP - 598 EP - 606 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 118 IS - 8 N2 - Influences of dietary patterns on musculoskeletal health are poorly understood in middle-aged women. This cross-sectional analysis from a cohort of 347 women (aged 36-57 years) aimed to examine associations between dietary patterns and musculoskeletal health outcomes in middle-aged women. Diet was measured by the Cancer Council of Victoria FFQ. Total body bone mineral content (TB BMC), femoral neck and lumbar spine bone density (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), lower limbs muscle strength (LMS) and balance tests (timed up and go test, step test, functional reach test (FRT) and lateral reach test) were also measured. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns and scores for each pattern generated using factor loadings with absolute values ≥0·20. Associations between food pattern scores and musculoskeletal outcomes were assessed using multivariable linear regression. Three dietary patterns were identified: 'Healthy' (high consumption of a plant-based diet - vegetables, legumes, fruit, tomatoes, nuts, snacks, garlic, whole grains and low intake of high-fat dairy products), 'high protein, high fat' (red meats, poultry, processed meats, potatoes, cruciferous and dark-yellow vegetables, fish, chips, spirits and high-fat dairy products) and 'Processed foods' (high intakes of meat pies, hamburgers, beer, sweets, fruit juice, processed meats, snacks, spirits, pizza and low intake of cruciferous vegetables). After adjustment for confounders, Healthy pattern was positively associated with LMS, whereas Processed foods pattern was inversely associated with TB BMC and FRT. The associations were not significant after accounting for multiple comparisons. There were no associations with any other outcomes. These results suggest that maintaining a healthy diet could contribute to bone acquisition, muscle strength and balance in adult life. However, while they provide some support for further investigating dietary strategies for prevention of age-related loss of muscle and deterioration in balance, the exploratory nature of the analyses means that confirmation in longitudinal studies and/or trials with pre-specified hypotheses is needed. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28990541/Associations_of_dietary_patterns_with_bone_mass_muscle_strength_and_balance_in_a_cohort_of_Australian_middle_aged_women_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114517002483/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -