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Association between Milk Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome among Korean Adults: Results from the Health Examinees Study.

Abstract

It has been suggested that a greater dairy consumption, particularly of milk, may have contributed in lowering the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). A cross-sectional analysis was conducted to examine the association between milk consumption and MetS, and its components among Korean adults aged 40-69. A total of 130,420 subjects (43,682 men and 86,738 women) from the Health Examinees Study were selected for the final analysis. Milk consumption was estimated using a validated 106-item food frequency questionnaire. MetS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP III). Logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between milk consumption and MetS after adjusting for potential confounders. In this study, the average milk consumption was 77.9 g/day, with the overall prevalence of MetS being 26.1% (29.1% in men and 24.6% in women). We found that the prevalence of the MetS was significantly lower in subjects with higher milk consumption (p < 0.0001). Adjusted OR for MetS was significantly lower in the highest milk consumption category (≥1 serving/day among men; ≥2 serving/day among women) than those in the lowest milk consumption category (OR: 0.92 95%CI: 0.86-0.99, p trend = 0.0160 in men; OR: 0.68, 95%CI: 0.60-0.76, p trend < 0.0001 in women). Overall, higher milk consumption was inversely associated with the MetS components: elevated waist circumference, elevated triglyceride, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (all p trend < 0.05). This study concludes that higher milk consumption is associated with the lower odds of MetS in Korean adults.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Food and Nutrition, Chung-Ang University, Gyeonggi-do 17546, Korea. ivory8320@cau.ac.kr.

    ,

    Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea. hwiwon@snu.ac.kr. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul 03080, Korea. hwiwon@snu.ac.kr.

    ,

    Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea. claireekim@snu.ac.kr. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul 03080, Korea. claireekim@snu.ac.kr.

    ,

    Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea. jiyeonlim@snu.ac.kr.

    ,

    JW Lee Center for Global Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03087, Korea. docmohw@snu.ac.kr. Department of Family Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea. docmohw@snu.ac.kr.

    Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea. dhkang@snu.ac.kr. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul 03080, Korea. dhkang@snu.ac.kr. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 03080, Korea. dhkang@snu.ac.kr.

    Source

    Nutrients 9:10 2017 Oct 08 pg

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Animals
    Biomarkers
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet
    Female
    Healthy Volunteers
    Humans
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Milk
    Multivariate Analysis
    Odds Ratio
    Prevalence
    Protective Factors
    Recommended Dietary Allowances
    Republic of Korea
    Risk Factors
    Serving Size
    Triglycerides
    Waist Circumference

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28991181

    Citation

    Shin, Sangah, et al. "Association Between Milk Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome Among Korean Adults: Results From the Health Examinees Study." Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 10, 2017.
    Shin S, Lee HW, Kim CE, et al. Association between Milk Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome among Korean Adults: Results from the Health Examinees Study. Nutrients. 2017;9(10).
    Shin, S., Lee, H. W., Kim, C. E., Lim, J., Lee, J. K., & Kang, D. (2017). Association between Milk Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome among Korean Adults: Results from the Health Examinees Study. Nutrients, 9(10), doi:10.3390/nu9101102.
    Shin S, et al. Association Between Milk Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome Among Korean Adults: Results From the Health Examinees Study. Nutrients. 2017 Oct 8;9(10) PubMed PMID: 28991181.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Milk Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome among Korean Adults: Results from the Health Examinees Study. AU - Shin,Sangah, AU - Lee,Hwi-Won, AU - Kim,Claire E, AU - Lim,Jiyeon, AU - Lee,Jong-Koo, AU - Kang,Daehee, Y1 - 2017/10/08/ PY - 2017/07/31/received PY - 2017/09/26/revised PY - 2017/10/03/accepted PY - 2017/10/10/entrez PY - 2017/10/11/pubmed PY - 2018/6/6/medline KW - Korean KW - metabolic syndrome KW - milk KW - the Health Examinees (HEXA) study JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 9 IS - 10 N2 - It has been suggested that a greater dairy consumption, particularly of milk, may have contributed in lowering the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). A cross-sectional analysis was conducted to examine the association between milk consumption and MetS, and its components among Korean adults aged 40-69. A total of 130,420 subjects (43,682 men and 86,738 women) from the Health Examinees Study were selected for the final analysis. Milk consumption was estimated using a validated 106-item food frequency questionnaire. MetS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP III). Logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between milk consumption and MetS after adjusting for potential confounders. In this study, the average milk consumption was 77.9 g/day, with the overall prevalence of MetS being 26.1% (29.1% in men and 24.6% in women). We found that the prevalence of the MetS was significantly lower in subjects with higher milk consumption (p < 0.0001). Adjusted OR for MetS was significantly lower in the highest milk consumption category (≥1 serving/day among men; ≥2 serving/day among women) than those in the lowest milk consumption category (OR: 0.92 95%CI: 0.86-0.99, p trend = 0.0160 in men; OR: 0.68, 95%CI: 0.60-0.76, p trend < 0.0001 in women). Overall, higher milk consumption was inversely associated with the MetS components: elevated waist circumference, elevated triglyceride, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (all p trend < 0.05). This study concludes that higher milk consumption is associated with the lower odds of MetS in Korean adults. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28991181/Association_between_Milk_Consumption_and_Metabolic_Syndrome_among_Korean_Adults:_Results_from_the_Health_Examinees_Study_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu9101102 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -