Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and habits towards antibiotics dispensed without medical prescription: a qualitative study of Spanish pharmacists.
BMJ Open. 2017 Oct 08; 7(10):e015674.BO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate community pharmacists' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and habits with regard to antibiotic dispensing without medical prescription in Spain.

METHODS

A qualitative research using focus group method (FG) in Galicia (north-west Spain). FG sessions were conducted in the presence of a moderator. A topic script was developed to lead the discussions, which were audiorecorded to facilitate data interpretation and transcription. Proceedings were transcribed by an independent researcher and interpreted by two researchers working independently. We used the Grounded Theory approach.

SETTING

Community pharmacies in Galicia, region Norwest of Spain.

PARTICIPANTS

Thirty pharmacists agreed to participate in the study, and a total of five FG sessions were conducted with 2-11 pharmacists. We sought to ensure a high degree of heterogeneity in the composition of the groups to improve our study's external validity. Pharmacists' participation had no gender or age restrictions, and an effort was made to form FGs with pharmacists who were both owners and non-owners, provided in all cases that they were Official Colleges of Pharmacists-registered community pharmacists. For the purpose of conducting FG discussions, the basic methodological principle of allowing groups to attain their 'own structural identity' was applied.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS

Community pharmacists' habits and knowledge with regard to antibiotics and identification of the attitudes and/or factors that influence antibiotic dispensing without medical prescription.

RESULTS

Pharmacists attributed the problem of antibiotics dispensed without medical prescription and its relationship to antibiotic resistance to the following attitudes: external responsibility (doctors, dentists and the National Health Service (NHS)); acquiescence; indifference and lack of continuing education.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite being a problem, antibiotic dispensing without a medical prescription is still a common practice in community pharmacies in Galicia, Spain. This practice is attributed to acquiescence, indifference and lack of continuing education. The problem of resistance was ascribed to external responsibility, including that of patients, physicians, dentists and the NHS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain. Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP), Santiago de Compostela, Spain.Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28993379

Citation

Vazquez-Lago, Juan, et al. "Knowledge, Attitudes, Perceptions and Habits Towards Antibiotics Dispensed Without Medical Prescription: a Qualitative Study of Spanish Pharmacists." BMJ Open, vol. 7, no. 10, 2017, pp. e015674.
Vazquez-Lago J, Gonzalez-Gonzalez C, Zapata-Cachafeiro M, et al. Knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and habits towards antibiotics dispensed without medical prescription: a qualitative study of Spanish pharmacists. BMJ Open. 2017;7(10):e015674.
Vazquez-Lago, J., Gonzalez-Gonzalez, C., Zapata-Cachafeiro, M., Lopez-Vazquez, P., Taracido, M., López, A., & Figueiras, A. (2017). Knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and habits towards antibiotics dispensed without medical prescription: a qualitative study of Spanish pharmacists. BMJ Open, 7(10), e015674. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015674
Vazquez-Lago J, et al. Knowledge, Attitudes, Perceptions and Habits Towards Antibiotics Dispensed Without Medical Prescription: a Qualitative Study of Spanish Pharmacists. BMJ Open. 2017 Oct 8;7(10):e015674. PubMed PMID: 28993379.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and habits towards antibiotics dispensed without medical prescription: a qualitative study of Spanish pharmacists. AU - Vazquez-Lago,Juan, AU - Gonzalez-Gonzalez,Cristian, AU - Zapata-Cachafeiro,Maruxa, AU - Lopez-Vazquez,Paula, AU - Taracido,Margarita, AU - López,Ana, AU - Figueiras,Adolfo, Y1 - 2017/10/08/ PY - 2017/10/11/entrez PY - 2017/10/11/pubmed PY - 2018/6/2/medline KW - Infectious diseases KW - antibiotic dispensing KW - community pharmacy KW - public health KW - qualitative research SP - e015674 EP - e015674 JF - BMJ open JO - BMJ Open VL - 7 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate community pharmacists' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and habits with regard to antibiotic dispensing without medical prescription in Spain. METHODS: A qualitative research using focus group method (FG) in Galicia (north-west Spain). FG sessions were conducted in the presence of a moderator. A topic script was developed to lead the discussions, which were audiorecorded to facilitate data interpretation and transcription. Proceedings were transcribed by an independent researcher and interpreted by two researchers working independently. We used the Grounded Theory approach. SETTING: Community pharmacies in Galicia, region Norwest of Spain. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty pharmacists agreed to participate in the study, and a total of five FG sessions were conducted with 2-11 pharmacists. We sought to ensure a high degree of heterogeneity in the composition of the groups to improve our study's external validity. Pharmacists' participation had no gender or age restrictions, and an effort was made to form FGs with pharmacists who were both owners and non-owners, provided in all cases that they were Official Colleges of Pharmacists-registered community pharmacists. For the purpose of conducting FG discussions, the basic methodological principle of allowing groups to attain their 'own structural identity' was applied. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Community pharmacists' habits and knowledge with regard to antibiotics and identification of the attitudes and/or factors that influence antibiotic dispensing without medical prescription. RESULTS: Pharmacists attributed the problem of antibiotics dispensed without medical prescription and its relationship to antibiotic resistance to the following attitudes: external responsibility (doctors, dentists and the National Health Service (NHS)); acquiescence; indifference and lack of continuing education. CONCLUSIONS: Despite being a problem, antibiotic dispensing without a medical prescription is still a common practice in community pharmacies in Galicia, Spain. This practice is attributed to acquiescence, indifference and lack of continuing education. The problem of resistance was ascribed to external responsibility, including that of patients, physicians, dentists and the NHS. SN - 2044-6055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28993379/Knowledge_attitudes_perceptions_and_habits_towards_antibiotics_dispensed_without_medical_prescription:_a_qualitative_study_of_Spanish_pharmacists_ L2 - http://bmjopen.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=28993379 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -