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Malaria Is More Prevalent Than Iron Deficiency among Anemic Pregnant Women at the First Antenatal Visit in Rural South Kivu.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017 Nov; 97(5):1551-1560.AJ

Abstract

Anemia is common during pregnancy and is associated with poor outcomes. Objectives were not only 1) to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) but also 2) to identify other factors associated with anemia in pregnant women from South Kivu province, in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Between December 2013 and March 2014, 531 women attending the first antenatal visit in their second trimester of pregnancy were recruited. Sociodemographic, clinical, and biological data were collected. Hemoglobin (Hb) was determined by a portable photometer (Hemocue® Hb201+), and anemia was defined as altitude-adjusted Hb < 110 g/L. ID was defined as serum ferritin < 15 μg/L adjusted for inflammation status (C-reactive protein [CRP] > 5 mg/L and/or α-1-acid glycoprotein > 1 g/L) whereas hypoalbuminemia was defined as serum albumin < 35 g/L. A Giemsa-stained blood smear was used to diagnose malaria. The median age (interquartile range) was 25.5 (21.1-31.3) years, with anemia in 17.6% and ID in 8%. Malaria was present in 7.5% and hypoalbuminemia among 44%. Soluble transferrin receptor concentration was higher in the presence of inflammation and/or malaria. In the final logistic regression model, factors independently associated with anemia were malaria (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 11.24 (4.98-25.37) P < 0.001), hypoalbuminemia [aOR: 2.14 (1.27-3.59); P = 0.004] and elevated CRP [aOR: 1.94 (1.10-3.45); P = 0.022]. ID was not highly prevalent and not associated with anemia in our population. Effective control of anemia during pregnancy in this region should consider fighting malaria and other infectious diseases in combination with measures to improve women's nutrition, both before and during pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Research in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya. Centre de Recherche en Sciences Naturelles de Lwiro, Bukavu, DR Congo.Faculty of Medicine, Université de Goma, Goma, DR Congo. Department of Clinical Biology, National University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda.Center of Research in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.Centre de Recherche en Sciences Naturelles de Lwiro, Bukavu, DR Congo.Division Provinciale de la Santé du Sud-Kivu, Bukavu, DR Congo.Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya.Laboratory of experimental hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.Center of Research in Health Policy and Systems-International Health, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29016317

Citation

Bahizire, Esto, et al. "Malaria Is More Prevalent Than Iron Deficiency Among Anemic Pregnant Women at the First Antenatal Visit in Rural South Kivu." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 97, no. 5, 2017, pp. 1551-1560.
Bahizire E, Tugirimana PL, Dramaix M, et al. Malaria Is More Prevalent Than Iron Deficiency among Anemic Pregnant Women at the First Antenatal Visit in Rural South Kivu. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017;97(5):1551-1560.
Bahizire, E., Tugirimana, P. L., Dramaix, M., Zozo, D., Bahati, M., Mwale, A., Meuris, S., & Donnen, P. (2017). Malaria Is More Prevalent Than Iron Deficiency among Anemic Pregnant Women at the First Antenatal Visit in Rural South Kivu. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 97(5), 1551-1560. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0267
Bahizire E, et al. Malaria Is More Prevalent Than Iron Deficiency Among Anemic Pregnant Women at the First Antenatal Visit in Rural South Kivu. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017;97(5):1551-1560. PubMed PMID: 29016317.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malaria Is More Prevalent Than Iron Deficiency among Anemic Pregnant Women at the First Antenatal Visit in Rural South Kivu. AU - Bahizire,Esto, AU - Tugirimana,P Lundimu, AU - Dramaix,Michèle, AU - Zozo,Déogratias, AU - Bahati,Mugisho, AU - Mwale,Andrew, AU - Meuris,Sylvain, AU - Donnen,Philippe, Y1 - 2017/10/10/ PY - 2017/10/11/pubmed PY - 2017/12/1/medline PY - 2017/10/11/entrez SP - 1551 EP - 1560 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 97 IS - 5 N2 - Anemia is common during pregnancy and is associated with poor outcomes. Objectives were not only 1) to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) but also 2) to identify other factors associated with anemia in pregnant women from South Kivu province, in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Between December 2013 and March 2014, 531 women attending the first antenatal visit in their second trimester of pregnancy were recruited. Sociodemographic, clinical, and biological data were collected. Hemoglobin (Hb) was determined by a portable photometer (Hemocue® Hb201+), and anemia was defined as altitude-adjusted Hb < 110 g/L. ID was defined as serum ferritin < 15 μg/L adjusted for inflammation status (C-reactive protein [CRP] > 5 mg/L and/or α-1-acid glycoprotein > 1 g/L) whereas hypoalbuminemia was defined as serum albumin < 35 g/L. A Giemsa-stained blood smear was used to diagnose malaria. The median age (interquartile range) was 25.5 (21.1-31.3) years, with anemia in 17.6% and ID in 8%. Malaria was present in 7.5% and hypoalbuminemia among 44%. Soluble transferrin receptor concentration was higher in the presence of inflammation and/or malaria. In the final logistic regression model, factors independently associated with anemia were malaria (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 11.24 (4.98-25.37) P < 0.001), hypoalbuminemia [aOR: 2.14 (1.27-3.59); P = 0.004] and elevated CRP [aOR: 1.94 (1.10-3.45); P = 0.022]. ID was not highly prevalent and not associated with anemia in our population. Effective control of anemia during pregnancy in this region should consider fighting malaria and other infectious diseases in combination with measures to improve women's nutrition, both before and during pregnancy. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29016317/Malaria_Is_More_Prevalent_Than_Iron_Deficiency_among_Anemic_Pregnant_Women_at_the_First_Antenatal_Visit_in_Rural_South_Kivu_ L2 - https://ajtmh.org/doi/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0267 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -