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Consumption of commercially produced snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages during the complementary feeding period in four African and Asian urban contexts.
Matern Child Nutr. 2017 10; 13 Suppl 2MC

Abstract

The availability and consumption of commercially produced foods and beverages have increased across low-income and middle-income countries. This cross-sectional survey assessed consumption of commercially produced foods and beverages among children 6-23 months of age, and mothers' exposure to promotions for these products. Health facility-based interviews were conducted among 218 randomly sampled mothers utilizing child health services in Dakar, Senegal; 229 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; 228 in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; and 222 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. In the day prior to the interview, 58.7% of 6-23-month-olds in Dakar, 23.1% in Dar es Salaam, 74.1% in Kathmandu Valley, and 55.0% in Phnom Penh had consumed a commercially produced snack food. In the previous week, the majority of children in Dakar (79.8%), Kathmandu Valley (91.2%), and Phnom Penh (80.6%) had consumed such products. Consumption of commercially produced sugar-sweetened beverages was noted among 32.0% of Phnom Penh, 29.8% of Dakar, 23.1% of Dar es Salaam, and 16.2% of Kathmandu Valley children. Maternal education was negatively associated with commercial snack food consumption in Dakar and Kathmandu Valley. Children of Phnom Penh mothers in the lowest wealth tercile were 1.5 times more likely to consume commercial snack food products, compared to wealthier mothers. These snack consumption patterns during the critical complementary feeding period demand attention; such products are often high in added sugars and salt, making them inappropriate for infants and young children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Helen Keller International, USA.Consultant to Helen Keller International.Helen Keller International, USA.Helen Keller International, Nepal.Helen Keller International, Tanzania.Helen Keller International, Senegal.Helen Keller International, Africa Regional Office.Helen Keller International, Cambodia.Helen Keller International, Senegal.Consultant to Helen Keller International.JB Consultancy, Johannesburg, South Africa. United Nations Children's Fund, South Africa.Consultant to Helen Keller International.Helen Keller International, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29032629

Citation

Pries, Alissa M., et al. "Consumption of Commercially Produced Snack Foods and Sugar-sweetened Beverages During the Complementary Feeding Period in Four African and Asian Urban Contexts." Maternal & Child Nutrition, vol. 13 Suppl 2, 2017.
Pries AM, Huffman SL, Champeny M, et al. Consumption of commercially produced snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages during the complementary feeding period in four African and Asian urban contexts. Matern Child Nutr. 2017;13 Suppl 2.
Pries, A. M., Huffman, S. L., Champeny, M., Adhikary, I., Benjamin, M., Coly, A. N., Diop, E. H. I., Mengkheang, K., Sy, N. Y., Dhungel, S., Feeley, A., Vitta, B., & Zehner, E. (2017). Consumption of commercially produced snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages during the complementary feeding period in four African and Asian urban contexts. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 13 Suppl 2. https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12412
Pries AM, et al. Consumption of Commercially Produced Snack Foods and Sugar-sweetened Beverages During the Complementary Feeding Period in Four African and Asian Urban Contexts. Matern Child Nutr. 2017;13 Suppl 2 PubMed PMID: 29032629.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of commercially produced snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages during the complementary feeding period in four African and Asian urban contexts. AU - Pries,Alissa M, AU - Huffman,Sandra L, AU - Champeny,Mary, AU - Adhikary,Indu, AU - Benjamin,Margaret, AU - Coly,Aminata Ndeye, AU - Diop,El Hadji Issakha, AU - Mengkheang,Khin, AU - Sy,Ndèye Yaga, AU - Dhungel,Shrid, AU - Feeley,Alison, AU - Vitta,Bineti, AU - Zehner,Elizabeth, PY - 2016/05/12/received PY - 2016/09/29/revised PY - 2016/10/14/accepted PY - 2017/10/17/entrez PY - 2017/10/17/pubmed PY - 2018/6/5/medline KW - child feeding KW - complementary feeding KW - double burden of malnutrition KW - infant and child nutrition KW - infant feeding KW - nutrition transition JF - Maternal & child nutrition JO - Matern Child Nutr VL - 13 Suppl 2 N2 - The availability and consumption of commercially produced foods and beverages have increased across low-income and middle-income countries. This cross-sectional survey assessed consumption of commercially produced foods and beverages among children 6-23 months of age, and mothers' exposure to promotions for these products. Health facility-based interviews were conducted among 218 randomly sampled mothers utilizing child health services in Dakar, Senegal; 229 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; 228 in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; and 222 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. In the day prior to the interview, 58.7% of 6-23-month-olds in Dakar, 23.1% in Dar es Salaam, 74.1% in Kathmandu Valley, and 55.0% in Phnom Penh had consumed a commercially produced snack food. In the previous week, the majority of children in Dakar (79.8%), Kathmandu Valley (91.2%), and Phnom Penh (80.6%) had consumed such products. Consumption of commercially produced sugar-sweetened beverages was noted among 32.0% of Phnom Penh, 29.8% of Dakar, 23.1% of Dar es Salaam, and 16.2% of Kathmandu Valley children. Maternal education was negatively associated with commercial snack food consumption in Dakar and Kathmandu Valley. Children of Phnom Penh mothers in the lowest wealth tercile were 1.5 times more likely to consume commercial snack food products, compared to wealthier mothers. These snack consumption patterns during the critical complementary feeding period demand attention; such products are often high in added sugars and salt, making them inappropriate for infants and young children. SN - 1740-8709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29032629/Consumption_of_commercially_produced_snack_foods_and_sugar_sweetened_beverages_during_the_complementary_feeding_period_in_four_African_and_Asian_urban_contexts_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12412 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -