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Prospective study of plasma homocysteine, its dietary determinants, and risk of age-related macular degeneration in men.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2018; 25(1):79-88OE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Cross-sectional and case-control studies generally support a direct association between elevated plasma homocysteine and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but data from prospective studies are limited. We examined the prospective relation of plasma homocysteine level, its dietary determinants, and risk of AMD in a large cohort of apparently healthy male physicians.

METHODS

During a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, we identified 146 incident cases of visually significant AMD (responsible for a reduction of visual acuity to 20/30 or worse), and 146 controls matched for age, smoking status, and time of blood draw. We measured concentration of homocysteine in blood samples collected at baseline using an enzymatic assay. and we assessed dietary intake of B vitamins and related compounds betaine and choline with a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline.

RESULTS

AMD was not associated with plasma level of homocysteine; the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of AMD comparing the highest and lowest quartile of homocysteine was 1.09 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.52-2.31; p for trend = 0.99). However, AMD was inversely associated with quartile of intake of total folate (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.24-1.23; p for trend = 0.08), vitamin B6 from food (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.17-0.88; p for trend = 0.01), and betaine (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.22-1.27; p for trend = 0.048).

CONCLUSIONS

These prospective data from a cohort of apparently healthy men do not support a major role for homocysteine in AMD occurrence, but do suggest a possible beneficial role for higher intake of several nutrients involved in homocysteine metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a The Division of Preventive Medicine , Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA.a The Division of Preventive Medicine , Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA. e Department of Epidemiology , Harvard School of Public Health , Boston , MA, USA.a The Division of Preventive Medicine , Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA. f Department of Nutrition , Harvard School of Public Health , Boston , MA, USA.a The Division of Preventive Medicine , Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA. c The Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention , Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA. d The Donald W. Reynolds Center for Cardiovascular Research , Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA. e Department of Epidemiology , Harvard School of Public Health , Boston , MA, USA.a The Division of Preventive Medicine , Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA. b The Division of Aging , Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29035128

Citation

Christen, William G., et al. "Prospective Study of Plasma Homocysteine, Its Dietary Determinants, and Risk of Age-related Macular Degeneration in Men." Ophthalmic Epidemiology, vol. 25, no. 1, 2018, pp. 79-88.
Christen WG, Cook NR, Chiuve SE, et al. Prospective study of plasma homocysteine, its dietary determinants, and risk of age-related macular degeneration in men. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2018;25(1):79-88.
Christen, W. G., Cook, N. R., Chiuve, S. E., Ridker, P. M., & Gaziano, J. M. (2018). Prospective study of plasma homocysteine, its dietary determinants, and risk of age-related macular degeneration in men. Ophthalmic Epidemiology, 25(1), pp. 79-88. doi:10.1080/09286586.2017.1362009.
Christen WG, et al. Prospective Study of Plasma Homocysteine, Its Dietary Determinants, and Risk of Age-related Macular Degeneration in Men. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2018;25(1):79-88. PubMed PMID: 29035128.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of plasma homocysteine, its dietary determinants, and risk of age-related macular degeneration in men. AU - Christen,William G, AU - Cook,Nancy R, AU - Chiuve,Stephanie E, AU - Ridker,Paul M, AU - Gaziano,J Michael, Y1 - 2017/10/16/ PY - 2017/10/17/pubmed PY - 2019/3/6/medline PY - 2017/10/17/entrez KW - Homocysteine KW - age-related macular degeneration KW - case–control KW - diet SP - 79 EP - 88 JF - Ophthalmic epidemiology JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiol VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Cross-sectional and case-control studies generally support a direct association between elevated plasma homocysteine and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but data from prospective studies are limited. We examined the prospective relation of plasma homocysteine level, its dietary determinants, and risk of AMD in a large cohort of apparently healthy male physicians. METHODS: During a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, we identified 146 incident cases of visually significant AMD (responsible for a reduction of visual acuity to 20/30 or worse), and 146 controls matched for age, smoking status, and time of blood draw. We measured concentration of homocysteine in blood samples collected at baseline using an enzymatic assay. and we assessed dietary intake of B vitamins and related compounds betaine and choline with a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. RESULTS: AMD was not associated with plasma level of homocysteine; the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of AMD comparing the highest and lowest quartile of homocysteine was 1.09 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.52-2.31; p for trend = 0.99). However, AMD was inversely associated with quartile of intake of total folate (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.24-1.23; p for trend = 0.08), vitamin B6 from food (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.17-0.88; p for trend = 0.01), and betaine (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.22-1.27; p for trend = 0.048). CONCLUSIONS: These prospective data from a cohort of apparently healthy men do not support a major role for homocysteine in AMD occurrence, but do suggest a possible beneficial role for higher intake of several nutrients involved in homocysteine metabolism. SN - 1744-5086 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29035128/Prospective_study_of_plasma_homocysteine_its_dietary_determinants_and_risk_of_age_related_macular_degeneration_in_men_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09286586.2017.1362009 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -