Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The ecophysiology of leaf cuticular transpiration: are cuticular water permeabilities adapted to ecological conditions?
J Exp Bot 2017; 68(19):5271-5279JE

Abstract

When the stomata are closed under drought, the only route for water loss from the leaf interior to the atmosphere is across the cuticle. Thus, the extent of cuticular transpiration in relation to the reservoirs of water in the plant and the water acquisition from the soil determines the fitness and survival of the plant. It is, therefore, widely assumed that the cuticular water permeability of plants regularly experiencing drought is comparatively low and, thus, adapted to the environment. To test this hypothesis, 382 measurements of cuticular permeability from 160 species were extracted from the literature published between 1996 and 2017. The data had been produced either by using isolated cuticles and astomatous leaf sides or by measuring the minimum leaf conductance under conditions assumed to induce maximum stomatal closure. The species were assigned to 11 life form groups. Except for two particular cases (epiphytes, and climbers and lianas), the cuticular permeabilities of all groups either did not differ significantly or the available data did not allow a statistical test. In conclusion, present knowledge either does not support the hypothesis that ecological adaptions of cuticular water permeability exist or the available data are insufficient to test it.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Würzburg, Julius von Sachs Institute of Biological Sciences, Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3, D-97082 Würzburg, Germany.University of Würzburg, Julius von Sachs Institute of Biological Sciences, Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3, D-97082 Würzburg, Germany.University of Würzburg, Julius von Sachs Institute of Biological Sciences, Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3, D-97082 Würzburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29036342

Citation

Schuster, Ann-Christin, et al. "The Ecophysiology of Leaf Cuticular Transpiration: Are Cuticular Water Permeabilities Adapted to Ecological Conditions?" Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 68, no. 19, 2017, pp. 5271-5279.
Schuster AC, Burghardt M, Riederer M. The ecophysiology of leaf cuticular transpiration: are cuticular water permeabilities adapted to ecological conditions? J Exp Bot. 2017;68(19):5271-5279.
Schuster, A. C., Burghardt, M., & Riederer, M. (2017). The ecophysiology of leaf cuticular transpiration: are cuticular water permeabilities adapted to ecological conditions? Journal of Experimental Botany, 68(19), pp. 5271-5279. doi:10.1093/jxb/erx321.
Schuster AC, Burghardt M, Riederer M. The Ecophysiology of Leaf Cuticular Transpiration: Are Cuticular Water Permeabilities Adapted to Ecological Conditions. J Exp Bot. 2017 Nov 9;68(19):5271-5279. PubMed PMID: 29036342.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The ecophysiology of leaf cuticular transpiration: are cuticular water permeabilities adapted to ecological conditions? AU - Schuster,Ann-Christin, AU - Burghardt,Markus, AU - Riederer,Markus, PY - 2017/10/17/pubmed PY - 2018/5/23/medline PY - 2017/10/17/entrez KW - Cuticular permeability KW - ecological adaptation KW - leaf cuticular transpiration KW - life form KW - minimum leaf conductance KW - permeance SP - 5271 EP - 5279 JF - Journal of experimental botany JO - J. Exp. Bot. VL - 68 IS - 19 N2 - When the stomata are closed under drought, the only route for water loss from the leaf interior to the atmosphere is across the cuticle. Thus, the extent of cuticular transpiration in relation to the reservoirs of water in the plant and the water acquisition from the soil determines the fitness and survival of the plant. It is, therefore, widely assumed that the cuticular water permeability of plants regularly experiencing drought is comparatively low and, thus, adapted to the environment. To test this hypothesis, 382 measurements of cuticular permeability from 160 species were extracted from the literature published between 1996 and 2017. The data had been produced either by using isolated cuticles and astomatous leaf sides or by measuring the minimum leaf conductance under conditions assumed to induce maximum stomatal closure. The species were assigned to 11 life form groups. Except for two particular cases (epiphytes, and climbers and lianas), the cuticular permeabilities of all groups either did not differ significantly or the available data did not allow a statistical test. In conclusion, present knowledge either does not support the hypothesis that ecological adaptions of cuticular water permeability exist or the available data are insufficient to test it. SN - 1460-2431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29036342/The_ecophysiology_of_leaf_cuticular_transpiration:_are_cuticular_water_permeabilities_adapted_to_ecological_conditions L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jxb/erx321 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -