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A longitudinal test of the predictions of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behaviour for passive and active suicidal ideation in a large community-based cohort.
J Affect Disord. 2018 02; 227:97-102.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS) aims to elucidate the key antecedents of suicide deaths. Limited research has tested the IPTS in a community setting, and very little longitudinal research has been conducted. The current study longitudinally tested the predictions of the IPTS for suicidal ideation in a large population-based sample.

METHODS

The PATH through Life study assesses three age cohorts (20's, 40's, 60's) every four years. Two interpersonal factors were estimated at the third wave of assessment: thwarted belongingness (TB) and perceived burdensomeness (PB). The roles of these factors in suicide ideation (active and passive) four years later were estimated using logistic regression models (n = 4545).

RESULTS

A one SD increase in TB was associated with increased odds of 37% for passive ideation and 24% for active ideation. For PB, odds were increased 2.5-fold for passive ideation and 2.4-fold for active ideation. A significant negative PB × TB interaction was found for passive but not active ideation. Effects were not consistent by age group or gender.

LIMITATIONS

Proxy measures were used to assess the constructs. The extended timeframe and low prevalence of suicidal ideation limited power to find effects within subgroups.

CONCLUSIONS

Although TB and PB were individually associated with suicidal thoughts, little evidence was found for the key predictions of the IPTS longitudinally. Further investigation of the dynamic interplay between interpersonal factors over time is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. Electronic address: philip.batterham@anu.edu.au.Centre for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.Centre for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.Centre for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.Black Dog Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29053982

Citation

Batterham, Philip J., et al. "A Longitudinal Test of the Predictions of the Interpersonal-psychological Theory of Suicidal Behaviour for Passive and Active Suicidal Ideation in a Large Community-based Cohort." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 227, 2018, pp. 97-102.
Batterham PJ, Walker J, Leach LS, et al. A longitudinal test of the predictions of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behaviour for passive and active suicidal ideation in a large community-based cohort. J Affect Disord. 2018;227:97-102.
Batterham, P. J., Walker, J., Leach, L. S., Ma, J., Calear, A. L., & Christensen, H. (2018). A longitudinal test of the predictions of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behaviour for passive and active suicidal ideation in a large community-based cohort. Journal of Affective Disorders, 227, 97-102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2017.10.005
Batterham PJ, et al. A Longitudinal Test of the Predictions of the Interpersonal-psychological Theory of Suicidal Behaviour for Passive and Active Suicidal Ideation in a Large Community-based Cohort. J Affect Disord. 2018;227:97-102. PubMed PMID: 29053982.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A longitudinal test of the predictions of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behaviour for passive and active suicidal ideation in a large community-based cohort. AU - Batterham,Philip J, AU - Walker,Jennie, AU - Leach,Liana S, AU - Ma,Jennifer, AU - Calear,Alison L, AU - Christensen,Helen, Y1 - 2017/10/08/ PY - 2017/03/29/received PY - 2017/09/11/revised PY - 2017/10/01/accepted PY - 2017/10/21/pubmed PY - 2018/9/8/medline PY - 2017/10/21/entrez KW - Interpersonal-psychological theory KW - Perceived burdensomeness KW - Suicidal behaviour KW - Suicidal ideation KW - Thwarted belongingness SP - 97 EP - 102 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 227 N2 - BACKGROUND: The Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS) aims to elucidate the key antecedents of suicide deaths. Limited research has tested the IPTS in a community setting, and very little longitudinal research has been conducted. The current study longitudinally tested the predictions of the IPTS for suicidal ideation in a large population-based sample. METHODS: The PATH through Life study assesses three age cohorts (20's, 40's, 60's) every four years. Two interpersonal factors were estimated at the third wave of assessment: thwarted belongingness (TB) and perceived burdensomeness (PB). The roles of these factors in suicide ideation (active and passive) four years later were estimated using logistic regression models (n = 4545). RESULTS: A one SD increase in TB was associated with increased odds of 37% for passive ideation and 24% for active ideation. For PB, odds were increased 2.5-fold for passive ideation and 2.4-fold for active ideation. A significant negative PB × TB interaction was found for passive but not active ideation. Effects were not consistent by age group or gender. LIMITATIONS: Proxy measures were used to assess the constructs. The extended timeframe and low prevalence of suicidal ideation limited power to find effects within subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Although TB and PB were individually associated with suicidal thoughts, little evidence was found for the key predictions of the IPTS longitudinally. Further investigation of the dynamic interplay between interpersonal factors over time is needed. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29053982/A_longitudinal_test_of_the_predictions_of_the_interpersonal_psychological_theory_of_suicidal_behaviour_for_passive_and_active_suicidal_ideation_in_a_large_community_based_cohort_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(17)30643-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -