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Longitudinal changes in cognition in young adult cannabis users.
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2018 08; 40(6):529-543.JC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Adolescent cannabis use (CU) is associated with impaired attention, executive function, and verbal learning/memory. These associations are generally observed in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies of cannabis users are lacking.

METHOD

The present study examines associations between CU and cognition over time in chronic daily adolescent-onset CUs, as compared to nonusing controls. Both groups completed a neuropsychological battery at study intake and again 2 years later.

RESULTS

Baseline group differences have been published and indicated deficits in verbal learning and memory, motivated decision-making, planning, and working memory in CUs. In this follow-up report, the longitudinal performance of users is compared to that of sustained nonusers using the same battery. At follow-up, the majority of CUs continued to report regular and heavy cannabis use. Relative impairments in the domains of working memory, planning and verbal memory remained stable, suggesting that these are enduring vulnerabilities associated with continued CU during young adulthood. Improvements in motivated decision-making were evident in both groups. In addition, CUs demonstrated relatively better performance on short-duration speeded tasks. An earlier age of CU onset was associated with poorer verbal learning and memory and planning performance over time.

CONCLUSIONS

Verbal learning and memory and planning processes, as well as their neural correlates, merit further scrutiny within etiological models of cannabis-induced cognitive impairments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Psychology , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.a Department of Psychology , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.a Department of Psychology , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.a Department of Psychology , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.a Department of Psychology , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.a Department of Psychology , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29058519

Citation

Becker, Mary P., et al. "Longitudinal Changes in Cognition in Young Adult Cannabis Users." Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 40, no. 6, 2018, pp. 529-543.
Becker MP, Collins PF, Schultz A, et al. Longitudinal changes in cognition in young adult cannabis users. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2018;40(6):529-543.
Becker, M. P., Collins, P. F., Schultz, A., Urošević, S., Schmaling, B., & Luciana, M. (2018). Longitudinal changes in cognition in young adult cannabis users. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 40(6), 529-543. https://doi.org/10.1080/13803395.2017.1385729
Becker MP, et al. Longitudinal Changes in Cognition in Young Adult Cannabis Users. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2018;40(6):529-543. PubMed PMID: 29058519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal changes in cognition in young adult cannabis users. AU - Becker,Mary P, AU - Collins,Paul F, AU - Schultz,Ashley, AU - Urošević,Snežana, AU - Schmaling,Brittany, AU - Luciana,Monica, Y1 - 2017/10/23/ PY - 2017/10/24/pubmed PY - 2019/9/3/medline PY - 2017/10/24/entrez KW - Adolescence KW - cannabis KW - executive function KW - memory KW - neurocognition SP - 529 EP - 543 JF - Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology JO - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol VL - 40 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Adolescent cannabis use (CU) is associated with impaired attention, executive function, and verbal learning/memory. These associations are generally observed in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies of cannabis users are lacking. METHOD: The present study examines associations between CU and cognition over time in chronic daily adolescent-onset CUs, as compared to nonusing controls. Both groups completed a neuropsychological battery at study intake and again 2 years later. RESULTS: Baseline group differences have been published and indicated deficits in verbal learning and memory, motivated decision-making, planning, and working memory in CUs. In this follow-up report, the longitudinal performance of users is compared to that of sustained nonusers using the same battery. At follow-up, the majority of CUs continued to report regular and heavy cannabis use. Relative impairments in the domains of working memory, planning and verbal memory remained stable, suggesting that these are enduring vulnerabilities associated with continued CU during young adulthood. Improvements in motivated decision-making were evident in both groups. In addition, CUs demonstrated relatively better performance on short-duration speeded tasks. An earlier age of CU onset was associated with poorer verbal learning and memory and planning performance over time. CONCLUSIONS: Verbal learning and memory and planning processes, as well as their neural correlates, merit further scrutiny within etiological models of cannabis-induced cognitive impairments. SN - 1744-411X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29058519/Longitudinal_changes_in_cognition_in_young_adult_cannabis_users_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13803395.2017.1385729 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -