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At the intersection of criminal justice involvement and sexual orientation: Dynamic networks and health among a population-based sample of young Black men who have sex with men.
Soc Networks 2017; 51:73-87SN

Abstract

Mass incarceration of young Black men has a significant impact on their network composition and stability that, in turn, may have major implications for health and well-being. A sub-group of young Black men with criminal justice involvement (CJI) identify as gay, bisexual or are non-identified men who have sex with men (hereafter MSM). This paper focuses on the potential effects of CJI on the composition of Black MSM social and sexual networks, their stability over time, and concomitant health and social outcomes. We use data from the UConnect study, a population-based cohort of young Black MSM 16-29 years of age (n=618) selected using respondent-driven sampling in Chicago from 2013-2016. Both confidant and sexual network name generators and interpreters were administered at 9-month intervals over three waves of data collection. Ego and dyadic-level data were collected on behaviors prevalent among MSM and including factors associated with network CJI, network stability, and health outcomes. Generalized Structural Equation Models (GSEM) were utilized to determine the relationship between CJI network composition, network stability and behaviors prevalent among young Black MSM and their networks. In the UConnect cohort, 46% had at least once been detained, arrested or spent time in jail or prison. In addition, 20% of participants reported incident CJI over the study period. Respondents with a history of CJI were significantly more likely to have CJI homophily in their confidant and sexual networks. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that the association between one's history of CJI, housing instability and drug use is partially explained by one's network CJI. In addition, a higher prevalence of network CJI is associated with increased turnover in the confidant network, and this network instability is also related to important health and social outcomes. This analysis describes the networks of criminal justice involved men among a representative sample of young Black MSM and demonstrates the relationship between CJI network homophily, network stability and their impact on several key health and social outcomes relevant to this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Chicago. Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago. Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, University of Chicago.Department of Medicine, University of Chicago. Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, University of Chicago.Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29062165

Citation

Schneider, J A., et al. "At the Intersection of Criminal Justice Involvement and Sexual Orientation: Dynamic Networks and Health Among a Population-based Sample of Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men." Social Networks, vol. 51, 2017, pp. 73-87.
Schneider JA, Lancki N, Schumm P. At the intersection of criminal justice involvement and sexual orientation: Dynamic networks and health among a population-based sample of young Black men who have sex with men. Soc Networks. 2017;51:73-87.
Schneider, J. A., Lancki, N., & Schumm, P. (2017). At the intersection of criminal justice involvement and sexual orientation: Dynamic networks and health among a population-based sample of young Black men who have sex with men. Social Networks, 51, pp. 73-87. doi:10.1016/j.socnet.2017.04.001.
Schneider JA, Lancki N, Schumm P. At the Intersection of Criminal Justice Involvement and Sexual Orientation: Dynamic Networks and Health Among a Population-based Sample of Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men. Soc Networks. 2017;51:73-87. PubMed PMID: 29062165.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - At the intersection of criminal justice involvement and sexual orientation: Dynamic networks and health among a population-based sample of young Black men who have sex with men. AU - Schneider,J A, AU - Lancki,N, AU - Schumm,P, Y1 - 2017/04/25/ PY - 2017/10/25/entrez PY - 2017/10/25/pubmed PY - 2017/10/25/medline SP - 73 EP - 87 JF - Social networks JO - Soc Networks VL - 51 N2 - Mass incarceration of young Black men has a significant impact on their network composition and stability that, in turn, may have major implications for health and well-being. A sub-group of young Black men with criminal justice involvement (CJI) identify as gay, bisexual or are non-identified men who have sex with men (hereafter MSM). This paper focuses on the potential effects of CJI on the composition of Black MSM social and sexual networks, their stability over time, and concomitant health and social outcomes. We use data from the UConnect study, a population-based cohort of young Black MSM 16-29 years of age (n=618) selected using respondent-driven sampling in Chicago from 2013-2016. Both confidant and sexual network name generators and interpreters were administered at 9-month intervals over three waves of data collection. Ego and dyadic-level data were collected on behaviors prevalent among MSM and including factors associated with network CJI, network stability, and health outcomes. Generalized Structural Equation Models (GSEM) were utilized to determine the relationship between CJI network composition, network stability and behaviors prevalent among young Black MSM and their networks. In the UConnect cohort, 46% had at least once been detained, arrested or spent time in jail or prison. In addition, 20% of participants reported incident CJI over the study period. Respondents with a history of CJI were significantly more likely to have CJI homophily in their confidant and sexual networks. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that the association between one's history of CJI, housing instability and drug use is partially explained by one's network CJI. In addition, a higher prevalence of network CJI is associated with increased turnover in the confidant network, and this network instability is also related to important health and social outcomes. This analysis describes the networks of criminal justice involved men among a representative sample of young Black MSM and demonstrates the relationship between CJI network homophily, network stability and their impact on several key health and social outcomes relevant to this population. SN - 0378-8733 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29062165/At_the_intersection_of_criminal_justice_involvement_and_sexual_orientation:_Dynamic_networks_and_health_among_a_population_based_sample_of_young_Black_men_who_have_sex_with_men_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/29062165/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -