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Cognition and the course of prodromal Parkinson's disease.
Mov Disord. 2017 Nov; 32(11):1640-1645.MD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prospective data on cognition in prodromal Parkinson's disease are limited. The objectives of this study were to assess in prodromal PD (1) if baseline cognition predicts conversion to clinical PD, (2) if baseline dopamine transporter binding predicts longitudinal changes in cognition, and (3) if impaired olfaction predicts future cognitive decline.

METHODS

Prodromal participants were 136 hyposmic individuals enrolled in the Parkinson Associated Risk Study. We examined baseline neuropsychological test performance in PD converters versus nonconverters and the association between baseline dopamine transporter binding and change in cognition. An additional 73 normosmic individuals were included in analyses of the relationship between hyposmia and cognitive decline.

RESULTS

In prodromal participants, baseline cognitive scores did not significantly predict conversion, but converters performed numerically worse on 5 of the 6 cognitive domains assessed, with the greatest differences in executive function/working memory (0.68 standard deviation lower) and global cognition (0.64 standard deviation lower). Lower baseline dopamine transporter binding predicted greater future decline in processing speed/attention (P = 0.02). Hyposmia predicted greater future decline in language (P = 0.005) and memory (P = 0.01) abilities.

CONCLUSIONS

Given hyposmia in the general population predicts cognitive decline, the role of cognition in predicting conversion in prodromal PD needs to be assessed in large cohorts followed long-term. The dopamine system may be associated with changes in processing speed/attention in individuals at risk for PD. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. PD Research, Education and Clinical Center, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.The Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.The Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29063713

Citation

Weintraub, Daniel, et al. "Cognition and the Course of Prodromal Parkinson's Disease." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 32, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1640-1645.
Weintraub D, Chahine LM, Hawkins KA, et al. Cognition and the course of prodromal Parkinson's disease. Mov Disord. 2017;32(11):1640-1645.
Weintraub, D., Chahine, L. M., Hawkins, K. A., Siderowf, A., Eberly, S., Oakes, D., Seibyl, J., Stern, M. B., Marek, K., & Jennings, D. (2017). Cognition and the course of prodromal Parkinson's disease. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 32(11), 1640-1645. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27189
Weintraub D, et al. Cognition and the Course of Prodromal Parkinson's Disease. Mov Disord. 2017;32(11):1640-1645. PubMed PMID: 29063713.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognition and the course of prodromal Parkinson's disease. AU - Weintraub,Daniel, AU - Chahine,Lana M, AU - Hawkins,Keith A, AU - Siderowf,Andrew, AU - Eberly,Shirley, AU - Oakes,David, AU - Seibyl,John, AU - Stern,Matthew B, AU - Marek,Kenneth, AU - Jennings,Danna, AU - ,, Y1 - 2017/10/24/ PY - 2017/05/10/received PY - 2017/09/01/revised PY - 2017/09/10/accepted PY - 2017/10/25/pubmed PY - 2018/6/26/medline PY - 2017/10/25/entrez KW - cognition KW - prediction KW - prodromal KW - risk factor SP - 1640 EP - 1645 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov Disord VL - 32 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prospective data on cognition in prodromal Parkinson's disease are limited. The objectives of this study were to assess in prodromal PD (1) if baseline cognition predicts conversion to clinical PD, (2) if baseline dopamine transporter binding predicts longitudinal changes in cognition, and (3) if impaired olfaction predicts future cognitive decline. METHODS: Prodromal participants were 136 hyposmic individuals enrolled in the Parkinson Associated Risk Study. We examined baseline neuropsychological test performance in PD converters versus nonconverters and the association between baseline dopamine transporter binding and change in cognition. An additional 73 normosmic individuals were included in analyses of the relationship between hyposmia and cognitive decline. RESULTS: In prodromal participants, baseline cognitive scores did not significantly predict conversion, but converters performed numerically worse on 5 of the 6 cognitive domains assessed, with the greatest differences in executive function/working memory (0.68 standard deviation lower) and global cognition (0.64 standard deviation lower). Lower baseline dopamine transporter binding predicted greater future decline in processing speed/attention (P = 0.02). Hyposmia predicted greater future decline in language (P = 0.005) and memory (P = 0.01) abilities. CONCLUSIONS: Given hyposmia in the general population predicts cognitive decline, the role of cognition in predicting conversion in prodromal PD needs to be assessed in large cohorts followed long-term. The dopamine system may be associated with changes in processing speed/attention in individuals at risk for PD. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. SN - 1531-8257 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29063713/Cognition_and_the_course_of_prodromal_Parkinson's_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -