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Bone Mass Development from Childhood into Young Adulthood in Patients with Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017 12; 23(12):2215-2226.IB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Children who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have increased risk of low bone mineral density (BMD). There is a scarcity of information on BMD development through puberty and into young adulthood in patients with childhood-onset IBD.

METHODS

We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of BMD in patients with childhood-onset IBD. In total, 74 children with IBD were followed into young adulthood, with a mean follow-up of 8.4 years. The BMD was assessed longitudinally using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine, total hip and whole body, and related to anthropometric measures.

RESULTS

Young adult male patients with IBD had lower mean BMD Z-scores for the lumbar spine at -0.8 (±1.1 SD) and total hip at -0.5 (±0.9 SD), as compared to standard references. In young female patients, the BMD Z-scores were within the normal range at all 3 measured sites as compared to the standard references. There were no significant differences in the BMD Z-scores between patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis. The female and male patients showed significantly improved mean lumbar spine BMD Z-scores during follow-up into young adulthood, indicating that bone accumulation in the lumbar spine continues beyond the expected age for achieving peak bone mass.

CONCLUSIONS

Male patients with childhood-onset IBD seem to have an increased risk of compromised BMD in young adulthood. Both female and male patients with IBD seem to increase their BMD beyond the age for expected peak bone mass (see Video abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/IBD/B648).

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg and Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; †Premier Research LLC, Durham, North Carolina; ‡Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; and §Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg and Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29064856

Citation

Sigurdsson, Gudmundur Vignir, et al. "Bone Mass Development From Childhood Into Young Adulthood in Patients With Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease." Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, vol. 23, no. 12, 2017, pp. 2215-2226.
Sigurdsson GV, Schmidt S, Mellström D, et al. Bone Mass Development from Childhood into Young Adulthood in Patients with Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017;23(12):2215-2226.
Sigurdsson, G. V., Schmidt, S., Mellström, D., Ohlsson, C., Kindblom, J. M., Lorentzon, M., & Saalman, R. (2017). Bone Mass Development from Childhood into Young Adulthood in Patients with Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 23(12), 2215-2226. https://doi.org/10.1097/MIB.0000000000001277
Sigurdsson GV, et al. Bone Mass Development From Childhood Into Young Adulthood in Patients With Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017;23(12):2215-2226. PubMed PMID: 29064856.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bone Mass Development from Childhood into Young Adulthood in Patients with Childhood-onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease. AU - Sigurdsson,Gudmundur Vignir, AU - Schmidt,Susanne, AU - Mellström,Dan, AU - Ohlsson,Claes, AU - Kindblom,Jenny M, AU - Lorentzon,Mattias, AU - Saalman,Robert, PY - 2017/10/25/pubmed PY - 2018/7/17/medline PY - 2017/10/25/entrez SP - 2215 EP - 2226 JF - Inflammatory bowel diseases JO - Inflamm Bowel Dis VL - 23 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Children who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have increased risk of low bone mineral density (BMD). There is a scarcity of information on BMD development through puberty and into young adulthood in patients with childhood-onset IBD. METHODS: We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of BMD in patients with childhood-onset IBD. In total, 74 children with IBD were followed into young adulthood, with a mean follow-up of 8.4 years. The BMD was assessed longitudinally using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine, total hip and whole body, and related to anthropometric measures. RESULTS: Young adult male patients with IBD had lower mean BMD Z-scores for the lumbar spine at -0.8 (±1.1 SD) and total hip at -0.5 (±0.9 SD), as compared to standard references. In young female patients, the BMD Z-scores were within the normal range at all 3 measured sites as compared to the standard references. There were no significant differences in the BMD Z-scores between patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis. The female and male patients showed significantly improved mean lumbar spine BMD Z-scores during follow-up into young adulthood, indicating that bone accumulation in the lumbar spine continues beyond the expected age for achieving peak bone mass. CONCLUSIONS: Male patients with childhood-onset IBD seem to have an increased risk of compromised BMD in young adulthood. Both female and male patients with IBD seem to increase their BMD beyond the age for expected peak bone mass (see Video abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/IBD/B648). SN - 1536-4844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29064856/Bone_Mass_Development_from_Childhood_into_Young_Adulthood_in_Patients_with_Childhood_onset_Inflammatory_Bowel_Disease_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ibdjournal/article-lookup/doi/10.1097/MIB.0000000000001277 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -