Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Preschool Intervention Can Promote Sustained Growth in the Executive-Function Skills of Children Exhibiting Early Deficits.
Psychol Sci. 2017 Dec; 28(12):1719-1730.PS

Abstract

This study examined the effects of the Head Start Research-Based, Developmentally Informed (REDI) preschool intervention on growth in children's executive-function (EF) skills from preschool through third grade. Across 25 Head Start centers, each of 44 classrooms was randomly assigned either to an intervention group, which received enhanced social-emotional and language-literacy components, or to a "usual-practice" control group. Four-year-old children (N = 356; 25% African American, 17% Latino, 58% European American; 54% girls) were followed for 5 years, and EF skills were assessed annually. Latent-class growth analysis identified high, moderate, and low developmental EF trajectories. For children with low EF trajectories, the intervention improved EF scores in third grade significantly more (d = 0.58) than in the control group. Children who received the intervention also demonstrated better academic outcomes in third grade than children who did not. Poverty often delays EF development; enriching the Head Start program with an evidence-based curriculum and teaching strategies can reduce early deficits and thereby facilitate school success.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington.2 Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University.2 Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University.3 Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29065281

Citation

Sasser, Tyler R., et al. "Preschool Intervention Can Promote Sustained Growth in the Executive-Function Skills of Children Exhibiting Early Deficits." Psychological Science, vol. 28, no. 12, 2017, pp. 1719-1730.
Sasser TR, Bierman KL, Heinrichs B, et al. Preschool Intervention Can Promote Sustained Growth in the Executive-Function Skills of Children Exhibiting Early Deficits. Psychol Sci. 2017;28(12):1719-1730.
Sasser, T. R., Bierman, K. L., Heinrichs, B., & Nix, R. L. (2017). Preschool Intervention Can Promote Sustained Growth in the Executive-Function Skills of Children Exhibiting Early Deficits. Psychological Science, 28(12), 1719-1730. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797617711640
Sasser TR, et al. Preschool Intervention Can Promote Sustained Growth in the Executive-Function Skills of Children Exhibiting Early Deficits. Psychol Sci. 2017;28(12):1719-1730. PubMed PMID: 29065281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preschool Intervention Can Promote Sustained Growth in the Executive-Function Skills of Children Exhibiting Early Deficits. AU - Sasser,Tyler R, AU - Bierman,Karen L, AU - Heinrichs,Brenda, AU - Nix,Robert L, Y1 - 2017/10/24/ PY - 2017/10/25/pubmed PY - 2018/7/24/medline PY - 2017/10/25/entrez KW - executive function KW - intervention KW - longitudinal KW - preschool KW - school adjustment KW - school readiness SP - 1719 EP - 1730 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 28 IS - 12 N2 - This study examined the effects of the Head Start Research-Based, Developmentally Informed (REDI) preschool intervention on growth in children's executive-function (EF) skills from preschool through third grade. Across 25 Head Start centers, each of 44 classrooms was randomly assigned either to an intervention group, which received enhanced social-emotional and language-literacy components, or to a "usual-practice" control group. Four-year-old children (N = 356; 25% African American, 17% Latino, 58% European American; 54% girls) were followed for 5 years, and EF skills were assessed annually. Latent-class growth analysis identified high, moderate, and low developmental EF trajectories. For children with low EF trajectories, the intervention improved EF scores in third grade significantly more (d = 0.58) than in the control group. Children who received the intervention also demonstrated better academic outcomes in third grade than children who did not. Poverty often delays EF development; enriching the Head Start program with an evidence-based curriculum and teaching strategies can reduce early deficits and thereby facilitate school success. SN - 1467-9280 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29065281/Preschool_Intervention_Can_Promote_Sustained_Growth_in_the_Executive_Function_Skills_of_Children_Exhibiting_Early_Deficits_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0956797617711640?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -