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Who Am I, and Who Do I Strive to Be? Applying a Theory of Self-Conscious Emotions to Medical Education.
Acad Med. 2018 06; 93(6):874-880.AM

Abstract

The self-conscious emotions of shame, guilt, and pride are a distinct set of cognitively complex, powerful, and ubiquitous emotions that arise when an individual engages in self-evaluation. Currently, little is known about the influence or outcomes of self-conscious emotions in medical learners. In this article, the authors present a leading theory of self-conscious emotions that outlines the appraisals and attributions that give rise to and differentiate shame, guilt, and two forms of pride. The authors then apply the theory to three relevant topics in medical education: perfectionism, professional identity formation, and motivation. In doing so, the authors present novel ways of viewing these topics through the lens of self-conscious emotion, suggest areas of future research, and outline a framework for emotional resilience training. Ultimately, the goal of this article is to highlight the fundamental nature of shame, guilt, and pride, which the authors believe are underappreciated and understudied in medical education, and to inform future empirical study on the role that these emotions might play in medical education. Additionally, from a practical standpoint, this article aims to encourage educators and learners to recognize self-conscious emotions in themselves and their colleagues, and to begin developing more resilient approaches to learning-approaches that acknowledge and confront shame, guilt, and pride in medical education.

Authors+Show Affiliations

W.E. Bynum IV was attending faculty, National Capital Consortium Family Medicine Residency, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, at the time this article was written. He is assistant professor, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, now; ORCID: http://orcid.org/000-0003-3796-9301. A.R. Artino Jr is professor, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2661-7853.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29068821

Citation

Bynum, William E., and Anthony R. Artino. "Who Am I, and Who Do I Strive to Be? Applying a Theory of Self-Conscious Emotions to Medical Education." Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, vol. 93, no. 6, 2018, pp. 874-880.
Bynum WE, Artino AR. Who Am I, and Who Do I Strive to Be? Applying a Theory of Self-Conscious Emotions to Medical Education. Acad Med. 2018;93(6):874-880.
Bynum, W. E., & Artino, A. R. (2018). Who Am I, and Who Do I Strive to Be? Applying a Theory of Self-Conscious Emotions to Medical Education. Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 93(6), 874-880. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001970
Bynum WE, Artino AR. Who Am I, and Who Do I Strive to Be? Applying a Theory of Self-Conscious Emotions to Medical Education. Acad Med. 2018;93(6):874-880. PubMed PMID: 29068821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Who Am I, and Who Do I Strive to Be? Applying a Theory of Self-Conscious Emotions to Medical Education. AU - Bynum,William E,4th AU - Artino,Anthony R,Jr PY - 2017/10/27/pubmed PY - 2019/9/4/medline PY - 2017/10/26/entrez SP - 874 EP - 880 JF - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges JO - Acad Med VL - 93 IS - 6 N2 - The self-conscious emotions of shame, guilt, and pride are a distinct set of cognitively complex, powerful, and ubiquitous emotions that arise when an individual engages in self-evaluation. Currently, little is known about the influence or outcomes of self-conscious emotions in medical learners. In this article, the authors present a leading theory of self-conscious emotions that outlines the appraisals and attributions that give rise to and differentiate shame, guilt, and two forms of pride. The authors then apply the theory to three relevant topics in medical education: perfectionism, professional identity formation, and motivation. In doing so, the authors present novel ways of viewing these topics through the lens of self-conscious emotion, suggest areas of future research, and outline a framework for emotional resilience training. Ultimately, the goal of this article is to highlight the fundamental nature of shame, guilt, and pride, which the authors believe are underappreciated and understudied in medical education, and to inform future empirical study on the role that these emotions might play in medical education. Additionally, from a practical standpoint, this article aims to encourage educators and learners to recognize self-conscious emotions in themselves and their colleagues, and to begin developing more resilient approaches to learning-approaches that acknowledge and confront shame, guilt, and pride in medical education. SN - 1938-808X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29068821/Who_Am_I_and_Who_Do_I_Strive_to_Be_Applying_a_Theory_of_Self_Conscious_Emotions_to_Medical_Education_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001970 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -