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Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women.
Osteoporos Int 2018; 29(2):385-396OI

Abstract

The role of dairy foods for hip fracture prevention remains controversial. In this study, among US men and women, a glass of milk per day was associated with an 8% lower risk of hip fracture. This contrasts with a reported increased risk with higher milk intake in Swedish women.

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this study was to examine whether higher milk and dairy food consumption are associated with risk of hip fracture in older adults following a report of an increased risk for milk in Swedish women.

METHODS

In two US cohorts, 80,600 postmenopausal women and 43,306 men over 50 years of age were followed for up to 32 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the relative risks (RR) of hip fracture per daily serving of milk (240 mL) and other dairy foods that were assessed every 4 years, controlling for other dietary intakes, BMI, height, smoking, activity, medications, and disease diagnoses.

RESULTS

Two thousand one hundred thirty-eight incident hip fractures were identified in women and 694 in men. Each serving of milk per day was associated with a significant 8% lower risk of hip fracture in men and women combined (RR = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87 to 0.97). A suggestive inverse association was found for cheese in women only (RR = 0.91, CI 0.81 to 1.02). Yogurt consumption was low and not associated with risk. Total dairy food intake, of which milk contributed about half, was associated with a significant 6% lower risk of hip fracture per daily serving in men and women (RR = 0.94, CI 0.90 to 0.98). Calcium, vitamin D, and protein from non-dairy sources did not modify the association between milk and hip fracture, nor was it explained by contributions of these nutrients from milk.

CONCLUSIONS

In this group of older US adults, higher milk consumption was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Drive, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. diane.feskanich@channing.harvard.edu.Department of Community Medicine and Global Health, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.Department of Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital and University of Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Drive, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29075804

Citation

Feskanich, D, et al. "Milk and Other Dairy Foods and Risk of Hip Fracture in Men and Women." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 29, no. 2, 2018, pp. 385-396.
Feskanich D, Meyer HE, Fung TT, et al. Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women. Osteoporos Int. 2018;29(2):385-396.
Feskanich, D., Meyer, H. E., Fung, T. T., Bischoff-Ferrari, H. A., & Willett, W. C. (2018). Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 29(2), pp. 385-396. doi:10.1007/s00198-017-4285-8.
Feskanich D, et al. Milk and Other Dairy Foods and Risk of Hip Fracture in Men and Women. Osteoporos Int. 2018;29(2):385-396. PubMed PMID: 29075804.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women. AU - Feskanich,D, AU - Meyer,H E, AU - Fung,T T, AU - Bischoff-Ferrari,H A, AU - Willett,W C, Y1 - 2017/10/27/ PY - 2017/05/16/received PY - 2017/10/23/accepted PY - 2017/10/28/pubmed PY - 2019/2/5/medline PY - 2017/10/28/entrez KW - Cohort KW - Dairy KW - Hip fracture KW - Men KW - Milk KW - Women SP - 385 EP - 396 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 29 IS - 2 N2 - : The role of dairy foods for hip fracture prevention remains controversial. In this study, among US men and women, a glass of milk per day was associated with an 8% lower risk of hip fracture. This contrasts with a reported increased risk with higher milk intake in Swedish women. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine whether higher milk and dairy food consumption are associated with risk of hip fracture in older adults following a report of an increased risk for milk in Swedish women. METHODS: In two US cohorts, 80,600 postmenopausal women and 43,306 men over 50 years of age were followed for up to 32 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the relative risks (RR) of hip fracture per daily serving of milk (240 mL) and other dairy foods that were assessed every 4 years, controlling for other dietary intakes, BMI, height, smoking, activity, medications, and disease diagnoses. RESULTS: Two thousand one hundred thirty-eight incident hip fractures were identified in women and 694 in men. Each serving of milk per day was associated with a significant 8% lower risk of hip fracture in men and women combined (RR = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87 to 0.97). A suggestive inverse association was found for cheese in women only (RR = 0.91, CI 0.81 to 1.02). Yogurt consumption was low and not associated with risk. Total dairy food intake, of which milk contributed about half, was associated with a significant 6% lower risk of hip fracture per daily serving in men and women (RR = 0.94, CI 0.90 to 0.98). Calcium, vitamin D, and protein from non-dairy sources did not modify the association between milk and hip fracture, nor was it explained by contributions of these nutrients from milk. CONCLUSIONS: In this group of older US adults, higher milk consumption was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture. SN - 1433-2965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29075804/Milk_and_other_dairy_foods_and_risk_of_hip_fracture_in_men_and_women_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-017-4285-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -