Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Specialty Linens and Pressure Injuries in High-Risk Patients in the Intensive Care Unit.
Am J Crit Care. 2017 Nov; 26(6):474-481.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The cardiovascular and surgical intensive care units had the highest unit-acquired pressure injury rates at an institution. Patients in these units had multiple risk factors for pressure injuries. Various interventions had been used to minimize pressure injuries, with limited results.

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate the effect of specialty linens on the rate of pressure injuries in high-risk patients. The specialty linen was a synthetic silklike fabric that addressed the microclimate surrounding the patient, with the purpose of minimizing friction, shear, moisture, and heat.

METHODS

The specialty linen was tried on 24 beds in the cardiovascular intensive care unit and 20 beds in the surgical intensive care unit, including sheets, underpads, gowns, and pillow cases. Data obtained from a retrospective review of electronic health records were compared for 9 months before and 10 months after specialty linens were implemented.

RESULTS

Total unit-acquired pressure injury rates for both units combined declined from 7.7% (n = 166) before to 5.3% (n = 95) after the intervention. The intervention was associated with a significant reduction in posterior (coccyx, sacrum, back, buttock, heel, and spine) pressure injury rates, from 5.2% (n = 113) before to 2.8% (n = 51) after specialty linens were implemented (P < .001).

CONCLUSION

Addressing the microclimate, friction, and shear by using specialty linens reduces the number of posterior pressure injuries. The use of specialty linens in addition to standard techniques for preventing pressure injuries can help prevent pressure injuries from developing in high-risk patients in intensive care units.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Regi Freeman is a clinical nurse specialist in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan Health System, and a member of the clinical adjunct faculty, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Andrew Smith is a staff nurse in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Sharon Dickinson is a clinical nurse specialist in the surgical intensive care unit, and Candace Friedman is a senior project manager, Office of Clinical Safety, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dana Tschannen is a clinical associate professor, vice chair of the Department of Systems, Population and Leadership, and director of the post-Master's DNP program, and Shandra James is a clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. colthorp@med.umich.edu.Regi Freeman is a clinical nurse specialist in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan Health System, and a member of the clinical adjunct faculty, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Andrew Smith is a staff nurse in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Sharon Dickinson is a clinical nurse specialist in the surgical intensive care unit, and Candace Friedman is a senior project manager, Office of Clinical Safety, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dana Tschannen is a clinical associate professor, vice chair of the Department of Systems, Population and Leadership, and director of the post-Master's DNP program, and Shandra James is a clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Regi Freeman is a clinical nurse specialist in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan Health System, and a member of the clinical adjunct faculty, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Andrew Smith is a staff nurse in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Sharon Dickinson is a clinical nurse specialist in the surgical intensive care unit, and Candace Friedman is a senior project manager, Office of Clinical Safety, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dana Tschannen is a clinical associate professor, vice chair of the Department of Systems, Population and Leadership, and director of the post-Master's DNP program, and Shandra James is a clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Regi Freeman is a clinical nurse specialist in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan Health System, and a member of the clinical adjunct faculty, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Andrew Smith is a staff nurse in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Sharon Dickinson is a clinical nurse specialist in the surgical intensive care unit, and Candace Friedman is a senior project manager, Office of Clinical Safety, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dana Tschannen is a clinical associate professor, vice chair of the Department of Systems, Population and Leadership, and director of the post-Master's DNP program, and Shandra James is a clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Regi Freeman is a clinical nurse specialist in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan Health System, and a member of the clinical adjunct faculty, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Andrew Smith is a staff nurse in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Sharon Dickinson is a clinical nurse specialist in the surgical intensive care unit, and Candace Friedman is a senior project manager, Office of Clinical Safety, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dana Tschannen is a clinical associate professor, vice chair of the Department of Systems, Population and Leadership, and director of the post-Master's DNP program, and Shandra James is a clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Regi Freeman is a clinical nurse specialist in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan Health System, and a member of the clinical adjunct faculty, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Andrew Smith is a staff nurse in the cardiovascular intensive care unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Sharon Dickinson is a clinical nurse specialist in the surgical intensive care unit, and Candace Friedman is a senior project manager, Office of Clinical Safety, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Dana Tschannen is a clinical associate professor, vice chair of the Department of Systems, Population and Leadership, and director of the post-Master's DNP program, and Shandra James is a clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29092870

Citation

Freeman, Regi, et al. "Specialty Linens and Pressure Injuries in High-Risk Patients in the Intensive Care Unit." American Journal of Critical Care : an Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, vol. 26, no. 6, 2017, pp. 474-481.
Freeman R, Smith A, Dickinson S, et al. Specialty Linens and Pressure Injuries in High-Risk Patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Am J Crit Care. 2017;26(6):474-481.
Freeman, R., Smith, A., Dickinson, S., Tschannen, D., James, S., & Friedman, C. (2017). Specialty Linens and Pressure Injuries in High-Risk Patients in the Intensive Care Unit. American Journal of Critical Care : an Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 26(6), 474-481. https://doi.org/10.4037/ajcc2017530
Freeman R, et al. Specialty Linens and Pressure Injuries in High-Risk Patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Am J Crit Care. 2017;26(6):474-481. PubMed PMID: 29092870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Specialty Linens and Pressure Injuries in High-Risk Patients in the Intensive Care Unit. AU - Freeman,Regi, AU - Smith,Andrew, AU - Dickinson,Sharon, AU - Tschannen,Dana, AU - James,Shandra, AU - Friedman,Candace, PY - 2017/11/3/entrez PY - 2017/11/3/pubmed PY - 2018/7/31/medline SP - 474 EP - 481 JF - American journal of critical care : an official publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses JO - Am J Crit Care VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The cardiovascular and surgical intensive care units had the highest unit-acquired pressure injury rates at an institution. Patients in these units had multiple risk factors for pressure injuries. Various interventions had been used to minimize pressure injuries, with limited results. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of specialty linens on the rate of pressure injuries in high-risk patients. The specialty linen was a synthetic silklike fabric that addressed the microclimate surrounding the patient, with the purpose of minimizing friction, shear, moisture, and heat. METHODS: The specialty linen was tried on 24 beds in the cardiovascular intensive care unit and 20 beds in the surgical intensive care unit, including sheets, underpads, gowns, and pillow cases. Data obtained from a retrospective review of electronic health records were compared for 9 months before and 10 months after specialty linens were implemented. RESULTS: Total unit-acquired pressure injury rates for both units combined declined from 7.7% (n = 166) before to 5.3% (n = 95) after the intervention. The intervention was associated with a significant reduction in posterior (coccyx, sacrum, back, buttock, heel, and spine) pressure injury rates, from 5.2% (n = 113) before to 2.8% (n = 51) after specialty linens were implemented (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Addressing the microclimate, friction, and shear by using specialty linens reduces the number of posterior pressure injuries. The use of specialty linens in addition to standard techniques for preventing pressure injuries can help prevent pressure injuries from developing in high-risk patients in intensive care units. SN - 1937-710X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29092870/Specialty_Linens_and_Pressure_Injuries_in_High-Risk_Patients_in_the_Intensive_Care_Unit. L2 - https://aacnjournals.org/ajcconline/article-lookup/doi/10.4037/ajcc2017530 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -