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Relationship between nutrient intake, body mass index, menstrual function, and ballet injury.
J Am Diet Assoc. 1989 Jan; 89(1):58-63.JA

Abstract

The effects of inadequate nutrition, menstrual dysfunction, and low body weight on the injury rate of ballerinas were studied. Forty-nine female ballet dancers, mean age 18.7 years, completed food frequency and injury questionnaires. Subjects were placed in one of two groups: those with an intake less than 70% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for key nutrients and those with an intake greater than 70% of the RDA for key nutrients. Sixty-nine percent of the dancers had intakes less than 70% of the RDA and were randomly assigned to either a vitamin/mineral supplement or to placebo for 6 months. The remaining dancers with diets adequate (greater than 70% RDA) in key nutrients received no treatment. All groups were questioned monthly about the incidence, severity, and nature of ballet injuries. Information regarding menses and height and weight was obtained. There were no significant differences in the severity or type of injuries among the dancers in the supplement, placebo, or no treatment groups. Dancers with abnormal menses had more bone injuries (mean = 15.00) than normally menstruating dancers (mean = 4.97) (p less than .05). Dancers with a Body Mass Index less than 19.0 spent more days with a low-grade injury (mean = 24.05) than dancers with a greater BMI (mean = 11.63) (p less than .05). There appears to be a relationship between dance injuries and both BMI and menstrual function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Foods and Nutrition, College of Health, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2909593

Citation

Benson, J E., et al. "Relationship Between Nutrient Intake, Body Mass Index, Menstrual Function, and Ballet Injury." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 89, no. 1, 1989, pp. 58-63.
Benson JE, Geiger CJ, Eiserman PA, et al. Relationship between nutrient intake, body mass index, menstrual function, and ballet injury. J Am Diet Assoc. 1989;89(1):58-63.
Benson, J. E., Geiger, C. J., Eiserman, P. A., & Wardlaw, G. M. (1989). Relationship between nutrient intake, body mass index, menstrual function, and ballet injury. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 89(1), 58-63.
Benson JE, et al. Relationship Between Nutrient Intake, Body Mass Index, Menstrual Function, and Ballet Injury. J Am Diet Assoc. 1989;89(1):58-63. PubMed PMID: 2909593.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between nutrient intake, body mass index, menstrual function, and ballet injury. AU - Benson,J E, AU - Geiger,C J, AU - Eiserman,P A, AU - Wardlaw,G M, PY - 1989/1/1/pubmed PY - 1989/1/1/medline PY - 1989/1/1/entrez SP - 58 EP - 63 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 89 IS - 1 N2 - The effects of inadequate nutrition, menstrual dysfunction, and low body weight on the injury rate of ballerinas were studied. Forty-nine female ballet dancers, mean age 18.7 years, completed food frequency and injury questionnaires. Subjects were placed in one of two groups: those with an intake less than 70% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for key nutrients and those with an intake greater than 70% of the RDA for key nutrients. Sixty-nine percent of the dancers had intakes less than 70% of the RDA and were randomly assigned to either a vitamin/mineral supplement or to placebo for 6 months. The remaining dancers with diets adequate (greater than 70% RDA) in key nutrients received no treatment. All groups were questioned monthly about the incidence, severity, and nature of ballet injuries. Information regarding menses and height and weight was obtained. There were no significant differences in the severity or type of injuries among the dancers in the supplement, placebo, or no treatment groups. Dancers with abnormal menses had more bone injuries (mean = 15.00) than normally menstruating dancers (mean = 4.97) (p less than .05). Dancers with a Body Mass Index less than 19.0 spent more days with a low-grade injury (mean = 24.05) than dancers with a greater BMI (mean = 11.63) (p less than .05). There appears to be a relationship between dance injuries and both BMI and menstrual function. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2909593/Relationship_between_nutrient_intake_body_mass_index_menstrual_function_and_ballet_injury_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/menstruation.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -