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Coral Symbiodinium Community Composition Across the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System is Influenced by Host Species and Thermal Variability.
Microb Ecol. 2018 May; 75(4):903-915.ME

Abstract

Reef-building corals maintain a symbiotic relationship with dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium, and this symbiosis is vital for the survival of the coral holobiont. Symbiodinium community composition within the coral host has been shown to influence a coral's ability to resist and recover from stress. A multitude of stressors including ocean warming, ocean acidification, and eutrophication have been linked to global scale decline in coral health and cover in recent decades. Three distinct thermal regimes (highTP, modTP, and lowTP) following an inshore-offshore gradient of declining average temperatures and thermal variation were identified on the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS). Quantitative metabarcoding of the ITS-2 locus was employed to investigate differences and similarities in Symbiodinium genetic diversity of the Caribbean corals Siderastrea siderea, S. radians, and Pseudodiploria strigosa between the three thermal regimes. A total of ten Symbiodinium lineages were identified across the three coral host species. S. siderea was associated with distinct Symbiodinium communities; however, Symbiodinium communities of its congener, S. radians and P. strigosa, were more similar to one another. Thermal regime played a role in defining Symbiodinium communities in S. siderea but not S. radians or P. strigosa. Against expectations, Symbiodinium trenchii, a symbiont known to confer thermal tolerance, was dominant only in S. siderea at one sampled offshore site and was rare inshore, suggesting that coral thermal tolerance in more thermally variable inshore habitats is achieved through alternative mechanisms. Overall, thermal parameters alone were likely not the only primary drivers of Symbiodinium community composition, suggesting that environmental variables unrelated to temperature (i.e., light availability or nutrients) may play key roles in structuring coral-algal communities in Belize and that the relative importance of these environmental variables may vary by coral host species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-3300, USA. baumannj@live.unc.edu.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-3300, USA. Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-3300, USA. Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, 302 Miles Godwin building, Norfolk, VA, 23529, USA.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-3300, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29098358

Citation

Baumann, J H., et al. "Coral Symbiodinium Community Composition Across the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System Is Influenced By Host Species and Thermal Variability." Microbial Ecology, vol. 75, no. 4, 2018, pp. 903-915.
Baumann JH, Davies SW, Aichelman HE, et al. Coral Symbiodinium Community Composition Across the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System is Influenced by Host Species and Thermal Variability. Microb Ecol. 2018;75(4):903-915.
Baumann, J. H., Davies, S. W., Aichelman, H. E., & Castillo, K. D. (2018). Coral Symbiodinium Community Composition Across the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System is Influenced by Host Species and Thermal Variability. Microbial Ecology, 75(4), 903-915. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00248-017-1096-6
Baumann JH, et al. Coral Symbiodinium Community Composition Across the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System Is Influenced By Host Species and Thermal Variability. Microb Ecol. 2018;75(4):903-915. PubMed PMID: 29098358.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coral Symbiodinium Community Composition Across the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System is Influenced by Host Species and Thermal Variability. AU - Baumann,J H, AU - Davies,S W, AU - Aichelman,H E, AU - Castillo,K D, Y1 - 2017/11/02/ PY - 2017/06/22/received PY - 2017/10/24/accepted PY - 2017/11/4/pubmed PY - 2019/2/5/medline PY - 2017/11/4/entrez KW - Coral KW - Environmental variability KW - Marine science KW - Symbiodinium KW - Symbiosis SP - 903 EP - 915 JF - Microbial ecology JO - Microb. Ecol. VL - 75 IS - 4 N2 - Reef-building corals maintain a symbiotic relationship with dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium, and this symbiosis is vital for the survival of the coral holobiont. Symbiodinium community composition within the coral host has been shown to influence a coral's ability to resist and recover from stress. A multitude of stressors including ocean warming, ocean acidification, and eutrophication have been linked to global scale decline in coral health and cover in recent decades. Three distinct thermal regimes (highTP, modTP, and lowTP) following an inshore-offshore gradient of declining average temperatures and thermal variation were identified on the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS). Quantitative metabarcoding of the ITS-2 locus was employed to investigate differences and similarities in Symbiodinium genetic diversity of the Caribbean corals Siderastrea siderea, S. radians, and Pseudodiploria strigosa between the three thermal regimes. A total of ten Symbiodinium lineages were identified across the three coral host species. S. siderea was associated with distinct Symbiodinium communities; however, Symbiodinium communities of its congener, S. radians and P. strigosa, were more similar to one another. Thermal regime played a role in defining Symbiodinium communities in S. siderea but not S. radians or P. strigosa. Against expectations, Symbiodinium trenchii, a symbiont known to confer thermal tolerance, was dominant only in S. siderea at one sampled offshore site and was rare inshore, suggesting that coral thermal tolerance in more thermally variable inshore habitats is achieved through alternative mechanisms. Overall, thermal parameters alone were likely not the only primary drivers of Symbiodinium community composition, suggesting that environmental variables unrelated to temperature (i.e., light availability or nutrients) may play key roles in structuring coral-algal communities in Belize and that the relative importance of these environmental variables may vary by coral host species. SN - 1432-184X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29098358/Coral_Symbiodinium_Community_Composition_Across_the_Belize_Mesoamerican_Barrier_Reef_System_is_Influenced_by_Host_Species_and_Thermal_Variability_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00248-017-1096-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -