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Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel.
Obstet Gynecol. 2017 12; 130(6):1357-1365.OG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To study characteristics and preventive interventions of adult pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seeking pretravel health care in the United States.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study analyzed data (2009-2014) of pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen at U.S. travel clinics participating in Global TravEpiNet. Nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers of childbearing age were used for comparison. We evaluated the prescription of malaria chemoprophylaxis and antibiotics for this population as well as the administration of three travel-related vaccines: hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever. We also evaluated use of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis and influenza vaccines, because these are widely recommended in pregnancy.

RESULTS

Of 21,138 female travelers of childbearing age in Global TravEpiNet, 170 (0.8%) were pregnant and 139 (0.7%) were breastfeeding. Many traveled to destinations endemic for mosquito-borne illnesses, including malaria (pregnant: 95%; breastfeeding: 94%), dengue (pregnant: 87%; breastfeeding: 81%), or yellow fever (pregnant: 35%; breastfeeding: 50%). Compared with nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers, eligible pregnant travelers were less likely to be vaccinated against hepatitis A (28% compared with 51%, P<.001) and typhoid (35% compared with 74%, P<.001). More than 20% of eligible pregnant travelers did not receive influenza vaccination. Yellow fever vaccine was occasionally provided to pregnant and breastfeeding travelers traveling to countries entirely endemic for yellow fever (6 [20%] of 30 pregnant travelers and 18 [46%] of 39 breastfeeding travelers). Half of pregnant travelers and two thirds of breastfeeding travelers preparing to travel to malaria-holoendemic countries received a prescription for malaria prophylaxis.

CONCLUSION

Most pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen for pretravel health consultations traveled to destinations with high risk for vector-borne or other travel-related diseases. Destination-specific preventive interventions were frequently underused.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, New York; the Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; the Department of Surgery, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; MGH Biostatistics Center and the Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; the Department of Pediatrics and the Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; the International Clinic, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; the Division of Infectious Diseases and Travel Medicine, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Massachusetts; and the Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29112671

Citation

Hagmann, Stefan H F., et al. "Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 130, no. 6, 2017, pp. 1357-1365.
Hagmann SHF, Rao SR, LaRocque RC, et al. Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel. Obstet Gynecol. 2017;130(6):1357-1365.
Hagmann, S. H. F., Rao, S. R., LaRocque, R. C., Erskine, S., Jentes, E. S., Walker, A. T., Barnett, E. D., Chen, L. H., Hamer, D. H., & Ryan, E. T. (2017). Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 130(6), 1357-1365. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002360
Hagmann SHF, et al. Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel. Obstet Gynecol. 2017;130(6):1357-1365. PubMed PMID: 29112671.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel. AU - Hagmann,Stefan H F, AU - Rao,Sowmya R, AU - LaRocque,Regina C, AU - Erskine,Stefanie, AU - Jentes,Emily S, AU - Walker,Allison T, AU - Barnett,Elizabeth D, AU - Chen,Lin H, AU - Hamer,Davidson H, AU - Ryan,Edward T, AU - ,, PY - 2017/11/8/pubmed PY - 2017/12/7/medline PY - 2017/11/8/entrez SP - 1357 EP - 1365 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 130 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To study characteristics and preventive interventions of adult pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seeking pretravel health care in the United States. METHODS: This cross-sectional study analyzed data (2009-2014) of pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen at U.S. travel clinics participating in Global TravEpiNet. Nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers of childbearing age were used for comparison. We evaluated the prescription of malaria chemoprophylaxis and antibiotics for this population as well as the administration of three travel-related vaccines: hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever. We also evaluated use of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis and influenza vaccines, because these are widely recommended in pregnancy. RESULTS: Of 21,138 female travelers of childbearing age in Global TravEpiNet, 170 (0.8%) were pregnant and 139 (0.7%) were breastfeeding. Many traveled to destinations endemic for mosquito-borne illnesses, including malaria (pregnant: 95%; breastfeeding: 94%), dengue (pregnant: 87%; breastfeeding: 81%), or yellow fever (pregnant: 35%; breastfeeding: 50%). Compared with nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers, eligible pregnant travelers were less likely to be vaccinated against hepatitis A (28% compared with 51%, P<.001) and typhoid (35% compared with 74%, P<.001). More than 20% of eligible pregnant travelers did not receive influenza vaccination. Yellow fever vaccine was occasionally provided to pregnant and breastfeeding travelers traveling to countries entirely endemic for yellow fever (6 [20%] of 30 pregnant travelers and 18 [46%] of 39 breastfeeding travelers). Half of pregnant travelers and two thirds of breastfeeding travelers preparing to travel to malaria-holoendemic countries received a prescription for malaria prophylaxis. CONCLUSION: Most pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen for pretravel health consultations traveled to destinations with high risk for vector-borne or other travel-related diseases. Destination-specific preventive interventions were frequently underused. SN - 1873-233X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29112671/Travel_Characteristics_and_Pretravel_Health_Care_Among_Pregnant_or_Breastfeeding_U_S__Women_Preparing_for_International_Travel_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002360 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -