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Diversity of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses in 109 dromedary camels based on full-genome sequencing, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017 Nov 08; 6(11):e101.EM

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was identified on the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and is still causing cases and outbreaks in the Middle East. When MERS-CoV was first identified, the closest related virus was in bats; however, it has since been recognized that dromedary camels serve as a virus reservoir and potential source for human infections. A total of 376 camels were screened for MERS-Cov at a live animal market in the Eastern Region of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE. In all, 109 MERS-CoV-positive camels were detected in week 1, and a subset of positive camels were sampled again weeks 3 through 6. A total of 126 full and 3 nearly full genomes were obtained from 139 samples. Spike gene sequences were obtained from 5 of the 10 remaining samples. The camel MERS-CoV genomes from this study represent 3 known and 2 potentially new lineages within clade B. Within lineages, diversity of camel and human MERS-CoV sequences are intermixed. We identified sequences from market camels nearly identical to the previously reported 2015 German case who visited the market during his incubation period. We described 10 recombination events in the camel samples. The most frequent recombination breakpoint was the junctions between ORF1b and S. Evidence suggests MERS-CoV infection in humans results from continued introductions of distinct MERS-CoV lineages from camels. This hypothesis is supported by the camel MERS-CoV genomes sequenced in this study. Our study expands the known repertoire of camel MERS-CoVs circulating on the Arabian Peninsula.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Oak Ridge Associated Universities Fellow, Oak Ridge, TN, USA.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Oak Ridge Associated Universities Fellow, Oak Ridge, TN, USA.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. IHRC Inc., Atlanta, GA, USA.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Al Ain, UAE.Health Authority of Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, UAE.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29116217

Citation

Yusof, Mohammed Farouk, et al. "Diversity of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronaviruses in 109 Dromedary Camels Based On Full-genome Sequencing, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates." Emerging Microbes & Infections, vol. 6, no. 11, 2017, pp. e101.
Yusof MF, Queen K, Eltahir YM, et al. Diversity of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses in 109 dromedary camels based on full-genome sequencing, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017;6(11):e101.
Yusof, M. F., Queen, K., Eltahir, Y. M., Paden, C. R., Al Hammadi, Z. M. A. H., Tao, Y., Li, Y., Khalafalla, A. I., Shi, M., Zhang, J., Mohamed, M. S. A. E., Abd Elaal Ahmed, M. H., Azeez, I. A., Bensalah, O. K., Eldahab, Z. S., Al Hosani, F. I., Gerber, S. I., Hall, A. J., Tong, S., & Al Muhairi, S. S. (2017). Diversity of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses in 109 dromedary camels based on full-genome sequencing, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 6(11), e101. https://doi.org/10.1038/emi.2017.89
Yusof MF, et al. Diversity of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronaviruses in 109 Dromedary Camels Based On Full-genome Sequencing, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017 Nov 8;6(11):e101. PubMed PMID: 29116217.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diversity of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses in 109 dromedary camels based on full-genome sequencing, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. AU - Yusof,Mohammed Farouk, AU - Queen,Krista, AU - Eltahir,Yassir Mohammed, AU - Paden,Clinton R, AU - Al Hammadi,Zulaikha Mohamed Abdel Hameed, AU - Tao,Ying, AU - Li,Yan, AU - Khalafalla,Abdelmalik Ibrahim, AU - Shi,Mang, AU - Zhang,Jing, AU - Mohamed,Muzammil Sayed Ahmed Elhaj, AU - Abd Elaal Ahmed,Mahmud Hamed, AU - Azeez,Ihsaan Abdulwahab, AU - Bensalah,Oum Keltoum, AU - Eldahab,Ziyada Swar, AU - Al Hosani,Farida Ismail, AU - Gerber,Susan I, AU - Hall,Aron J, AU - Tong,Suxiang, AU - Al Muhairi,Salama Suhail, Y1 - 2017/11/08/ PY - 2017/05/26/received PY - 2017/09/08/revised PY - 2017/09/15/accepted PY - 2017/11/9/entrez PY - 2017/11/9/pubmed PY - 2018/7/5/medline SP - e101 EP - e101 JF - Emerging microbes & infections JO - Emerg Microbes Infect VL - 6 IS - 11 N2 - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was identified on the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and is still causing cases and outbreaks in the Middle East. When MERS-CoV was first identified, the closest related virus was in bats; however, it has since been recognized that dromedary camels serve as a virus reservoir and potential source for human infections. A total of 376 camels were screened for MERS-Cov at a live animal market in the Eastern Region of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE. In all, 109 MERS-CoV-positive camels were detected in week 1, and a subset of positive camels were sampled again weeks 3 through 6. A total of 126 full and 3 nearly full genomes were obtained from 139 samples. Spike gene sequences were obtained from 5 of the 10 remaining samples. The camel MERS-CoV genomes from this study represent 3 known and 2 potentially new lineages within clade B. Within lineages, diversity of camel and human MERS-CoV sequences are intermixed. We identified sequences from market camels nearly identical to the previously reported 2015 German case who visited the market during his incubation period. We described 10 recombination events in the camel samples. The most frequent recombination breakpoint was the junctions between ORF1b and S. Evidence suggests MERS-CoV infection in humans results from continued introductions of distinct MERS-CoV lineages from camels. This hypothesis is supported by the camel MERS-CoV genomes sequenced in this study. Our study expands the known repertoire of camel MERS-CoVs circulating on the Arabian Peninsula. SN - 2222-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29116217/Diversity_of_Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronaviruses_in_109_dromedary_camels_based_on_full_genome_sequencing_Abu_Dhabi_United_Arab_Emirates_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1038/emi.2017.89 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -