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Impact of Lactobacillus reuteri colonization on gut microbiota, inflammation, and crying time in infant colic.
Sci Rep 2017; 7(1):15047SR

Abstract

Infant colic is a distressing condition of unknown etiology. An aberrant gastrointestinal microbiota has been associated, and Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation has been shown to reduce crying and/or fussing time ('crying time') in some infants with colic. The relationship between L. reuteri gut colonization and crying time has not been examined. We investigated the relationship between L. reuteri colonization and fecal microbiota (microbial diversity and Escherichia coli), intestinal inflammation, and crying time in infants with colic, using a subset of 65 infants from the Baby Biotics trial, which randomized healthy term infants aged <13 weeks with infant colic to receive probiotic L. reuteri DSM 17938 (1 × 108 colony forming units) or placebo daily for 28 days. We observed an overall reduction in median crying time, regardless of L. reuteri colonization status (n = 14 colonized). There were no differences in E. coli colonization rates or densities, microbial diversity or intestinal inflammation by L. reuteri colonization status. We found that L. reuteri density positively correlated with crying time, and E. coli density negatively correlated with microbial diversity. As density of L. reuteri was associated with increased crying time, L. reuteri supplementation may not be an appropriate treatment for all infants with colic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, 3052, Australia.Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, 3052, Australia. The University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3052, Australia.Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, 3052, Australia.Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, 3052, Australia. The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, 3052, Australia. The University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3052, Australia.Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, 3052, Australia. The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, 3052, Australia. The University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3052, Australia.Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, 3052, Australia. The University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3052, Australia.Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, 3052, Australia. mimi.tang@rch.org.au. The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, 3052, Australia. mimi.tang@rch.org.au. The University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3052, Australia. mimi.tang@rch.org.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29118383

Citation

Nation, Monica L., et al. "Impact of Lactobacillus Reuteri Colonization On Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Crying Time in Infant Colic." Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, 2017, p. 15047.
Nation ML, Dunne EM, Joseph SJ, et al. Impact of Lactobacillus reuteri colonization on gut microbiota, inflammation, and crying time in infant colic. Sci Rep. 2017;7(1):15047.
Nation, M. L., Dunne, E. M., Joseph, S. J., Mensah, F. K., Sung, V., Satzke, C., & Tang, M. L. K. (2017). Impact of Lactobacillus reuteri colonization on gut microbiota, inflammation, and crying time in infant colic. Scientific Reports, 7(1), p. 15047. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15404-7.
Nation ML, et al. Impact of Lactobacillus Reuteri Colonization On Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Crying Time in Infant Colic. Sci Rep. 2017 11 8;7(1):15047. PubMed PMID: 29118383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of Lactobacillus reuteri colonization on gut microbiota, inflammation, and crying time in infant colic. AU - Nation,Monica L, AU - Dunne,Eileen M, AU - Joseph,Shayne J, AU - Mensah,Fiona K, AU - Sung,Valerie, AU - Satzke,Catherine, AU - Tang,Mimi L K, Y1 - 2017/11/08/ PY - 2017/07/24/received PY - 2017/10/26/accepted PY - 2017/11/10/entrez PY - 2017/11/10/pubmed PY - 2017/11/10/medline SP - 15047 EP - 15047 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - Infant colic is a distressing condition of unknown etiology. An aberrant gastrointestinal microbiota has been associated, and Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation has been shown to reduce crying and/or fussing time ('crying time') in some infants with colic. The relationship between L. reuteri gut colonization and crying time has not been examined. We investigated the relationship between L. reuteri colonization and fecal microbiota (microbial diversity and Escherichia coli), intestinal inflammation, and crying time in infants with colic, using a subset of 65 infants from the Baby Biotics trial, which randomized healthy term infants aged <13 weeks with infant colic to receive probiotic L. reuteri DSM 17938 (1 × 108 colony forming units) or placebo daily for 28 days. We observed an overall reduction in median crying time, regardless of L. reuteri colonization status (n = 14 colonized). There were no differences in E. coli colonization rates or densities, microbial diversity or intestinal inflammation by L. reuteri colonization status. We found that L. reuteri density positively correlated with crying time, and E. coli density negatively correlated with microbial diversity. As density of L. reuteri was associated with increased crying time, L. reuteri supplementation may not be an appropriate treatment for all infants with colic. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29118383/Impact_of_Lactobacillus_reuteri_colonization_on_gut_microbiota_inflammation_and_crying_time_in_infant_colic_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15404-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -