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Perceptions of neighborhood safety and depressive symptoms among older minority urban subsidized housing residents: the mediating effect of sense of community belonging.
Aging Ment Health. 2018 12; 22(12):1564-1569.AM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Older minority subsidized housing residents represent a population that is particularly vulnerable to depression. Although research suggests that neighborhood characteristics influence older adults' mental health, it has not been explored in this target population. Drawing on social disorganization and social capital theories, this study's aim was to explore if perceptions of neighborhood safety are associated with depressive symptoms; and, whether a sense of community belonging has a mediating effect on this potential relationship.

METHODS

The data are from interviews with 216 older adults (50% Black, 45% Latino/a) living in a U.S. urban subsidized housing development.

RESULTS

Among participants, 80% identified feeling 'very safe' during the day while 63% expressed feeling 'very safe' at night in their neighborhood. Approximately 60% possessed a stronger sense of community belonging and 26% had clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that perceptions of feeling less safe in one's neighborhood were significantly associated with elevated levels of depressive symptoms; however, a greater sense of community belonging buffered (or had a significant mediating effect on) this relationship.

CONCLUSION

The findings suggest the importance of continued exploration of the role of social capital in relation to feelings of safety in later life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Social Research Department, School of Social Work , Boston University , Boston , MA , United States.b The American City Coalition (TACC) , Roxbury , MA , United States.c Social Work Department , Skidmore College , Saratoga Springs , NY , United States.a Social Research Department, School of Social Work , Boston University , Boston , MA , United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29125319

Citation

Gonyea, Judith G., et al. "Perceptions of Neighborhood Safety and Depressive Symptoms Among Older Minority Urban Subsidized Housing Residents: the Mediating Effect of Sense of Community Belonging." Aging & Mental Health, vol. 22, no. 12, 2018, pp. 1564-1569.
Gonyea JG, Curley A, Melekis K, et al. Perceptions of neighborhood safety and depressive symptoms among older minority urban subsidized housing residents: the mediating effect of sense of community belonging. Aging Ment Health. 2018;22(12):1564-1569.
Gonyea, J. G., Curley, A., Melekis, K., & Lee, Y. (2018). Perceptions of neighborhood safety and depressive symptoms among older minority urban subsidized housing residents: the mediating effect of sense of community belonging. Aging & Mental Health, 22(12), 1564-1569. https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2017.1383970
Gonyea JG, et al. Perceptions of Neighborhood Safety and Depressive Symptoms Among Older Minority Urban Subsidized Housing Residents: the Mediating Effect of Sense of Community Belonging. Aging Ment Health. 2018;22(12):1564-1569. PubMed PMID: 29125319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perceptions of neighborhood safety and depressive symptoms among older minority urban subsidized housing residents: the mediating effect of sense of community belonging. AU - Gonyea,Judith G, AU - Curley,Alexandra, AU - Melekis,Kelly, AU - Lee,Yeonjung, Y1 - 2017/11/10/ PY - 2017/11/11/pubmed PY - 2019/11/7/medline PY - 2017/11/11/entrez KW - Urban KW - depression KW - minority aging KW - neighborhood KW - sense of belonging SP - 1564 EP - 1569 JF - Aging & mental health JO - Aging Ment Health VL - 22 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Older minority subsidized housing residents represent a population that is particularly vulnerable to depression. Although research suggests that neighborhood characteristics influence older adults' mental health, it has not been explored in this target population. Drawing on social disorganization and social capital theories, this study's aim was to explore if perceptions of neighborhood safety are associated with depressive symptoms; and, whether a sense of community belonging has a mediating effect on this potential relationship. METHODS: The data are from interviews with 216 older adults (50% Black, 45% Latino/a) living in a U.S. urban subsidized housing development. RESULTS: Among participants, 80% identified feeling 'very safe' during the day while 63% expressed feeling 'very safe' at night in their neighborhood. Approximately 60% possessed a stronger sense of community belonging and 26% had clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that perceptions of feeling less safe in one's neighborhood were significantly associated with elevated levels of depressive symptoms; however, a greater sense of community belonging buffered (or had a significant mediating effect on) this relationship. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest the importance of continued exploration of the role of social capital in relation to feelings of safety in later life. SN - 1364-6915 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29125319/Perceptions_of_neighborhood_safety_and_depressive_symptoms_among_older_minority_urban_subsidized_housing_residents:_the_mediating_effect_of_sense_of_community_belonging_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13607863.2017.1383970 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -