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Antimicrobial activities of gaseous essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes on a laboratory medium and radish sprouts.
Int J Food Microbiol. 2018 Jan 16; 265:49-54.IJ

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of gaseous essential oils (EO gases) against Listeria monocytogenes on the surfaces of a laboratory medium and radish sprouts. We determined the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) values of EO gases from eight EOs extracted from basil leaves, carrot seed, cinnamon bark, cinnamon leaves, clove flower buds, oregano leaves, thyme flowers (linalool), and thyme leaves (thymol) against L. monocytogenes on a nutrient agar supplemented with 1% glucose and 0.025% bromocresol purple (NGBA). Oregano, thyme thymol, and cinnamon bark EO gases showed the strongest antilisterial activities (MIC and MLC, 78.1μL/L). We also investigated the inhibitory and lethal activities of these gases against L. monocytogenes on the surface of radish sprouts. The number of L. monocytogenes after exposure to EO gases at ≥156μL/L was significantly (P≤0.05) lower than that of untreated L. monocytogenes. For example, the initial number of L. monocytogenes on the surface of radish sprouts (ca. 6.3logCFU/g) decreased by 1.4logCFU/g within 24h at 30°C and 43% relative humidity (RH) without EO gas treatment, whereas the number of L. monocytogenes after exposure to oregano, thyme thymol, and cinnamon bark EO gases at 156μL/L decreased by 2.1, 2.1, and 1.8logCFU/g, respectively, after 24h. Although EO gases exerted greater lethal activities at higher concentrations (312 and 625μL/L), L. monocytogenes on the surface of radish sprouts was not completely inactivated. The number of L. monocytogenes on sprouts treated with oregano, thyme thymol, and cinnamon bark EO gases at 625μL/L decreased by 2.7-3.0logCFU/g after 24h at 30°C and 43% RH. Results indicate that EO gases that showed antilisterial activities on a laboratory medium also exhibited reduced lethal activity on the surface of radish sprouts. These findings will be useful when developing strategies to inactivate L. monocytogenes and possibly other foodborne pathogens on sprouts and perhaps other foods using EO gases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.Department of Food and Nutrition, Wonkwang University, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538, Republic of Korea.Center for Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, GA 30223-1797, USA.Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: escheri@korea.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29127810

Citation

Lee, Gyeongmin, et al. "Antimicrobial Activities of Gaseous Essential Oils Against Listeria Monocytogenes On a Laboratory Medium and Radish Sprouts." International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 265, 2018, pp. 49-54.
Lee G, Kim Y, Kim H, et al. Antimicrobial activities of gaseous essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes on a laboratory medium and radish sprouts. Int J Food Microbiol. 2018;265:49-54.
Lee, G., Kim, Y., Kim, H., Beuchat, L. R., & Ryu, J. H. (2018). Antimicrobial activities of gaseous essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes on a laboratory medium and radish sprouts. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 265, 49-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2017.11.001
Lee G, et al. Antimicrobial Activities of Gaseous Essential Oils Against Listeria Monocytogenes On a Laboratory Medium and Radish Sprouts. Int J Food Microbiol. 2018 Jan 16;265:49-54. PubMed PMID: 29127810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antimicrobial activities of gaseous essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes on a laboratory medium and radish sprouts. AU - Lee,Gyeongmin, AU - Kim,Yoonbin, AU - Kim,Hoikyung, AU - Beuchat,Larry R, AU - Ryu,Jee-Hoon, Y1 - 2017/11/04/ PY - 2017/07/31/received PY - 2017/10/01/revised PY - 2017/11/02/accepted PY - 2017/11/12/pubmed PY - 2018/3/20/medline PY - 2017/11/12/entrez KW - Gaseous essential oil KW - Listeria monocytogenes KW - Minimal inhibitory concentration KW - Minimal lethal concentration KW - Radish sprouts SP - 49 EP - 54 JF - International journal of food microbiology JO - Int J Food Microbiol VL - 265 N2 - The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of gaseous essential oils (EO gases) against Listeria monocytogenes on the surfaces of a laboratory medium and radish sprouts. We determined the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) values of EO gases from eight EOs extracted from basil leaves, carrot seed, cinnamon bark, cinnamon leaves, clove flower buds, oregano leaves, thyme flowers (linalool), and thyme leaves (thymol) against L. monocytogenes on a nutrient agar supplemented with 1% glucose and 0.025% bromocresol purple (NGBA). Oregano, thyme thymol, and cinnamon bark EO gases showed the strongest antilisterial activities (MIC and MLC, 78.1μL/L). We also investigated the inhibitory and lethal activities of these gases against L. monocytogenes on the surface of radish sprouts. The number of L. monocytogenes after exposure to EO gases at ≥156μL/L was significantly (P≤0.05) lower than that of untreated L. monocytogenes. For example, the initial number of L. monocytogenes on the surface of radish sprouts (ca. 6.3logCFU/g) decreased by 1.4logCFU/g within 24h at 30°C and 43% relative humidity (RH) without EO gas treatment, whereas the number of L. monocytogenes after exposure to oregano, thyme thymol, and cinnamon bark EO gases at 156μL/L decreased by 2.1, 2.1, and 1.8logCFU/g, respectively, after 24h. Although EO gases exerted greater lethal activities at higher concentrations (312 and 625μL/L), L. monocytogenes on the surface of radish sprouts was not completely inactivated. The number of L. monocytogenes on sprouts treated with oregano, thyme thymol, and cinnamon bark EO gases at 625μL/L decreased by 2.7-3.0logCFU/g after 24h at 30°C and 43% RH. Results indicate that EO gases that showed antilisterial activities on a laboratory medium also exhibited reduced lethal activity on the surface of radish sprouts. These findings will be useful when developing strategies to inactivate L. monocytogenes and possibly other foodborne pathogens on sprouts and perhaps other foods using EO gases. SN - 1879-3460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29127810/Antimicrobial_activities_of_gaseous_essential_oils_against_Listeria_monocytogenes_on_a_laboratory_medium_and_radish_sprouts_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -