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Impact of Alcohol Intake and Drinking Patterns on Mortality From All Causes and Major Causes of Death in a Japanese Population.
J Epidemiol 2018; 28(3):140-148JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We examined the associations of alcohol consumption and liver holidays with all-cause mortality and with mortality due to cancer, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, respiratory disease, and injury using a large-scale prospective study in Japan.

METHODS

We followed 102,849 Japanese who were aged between 40 and 69 years at baseline for 18.2 years on average, during which 15,203 deaths were reported. Associations between alcohol intake and mortality risk were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model, with analysis by the number of liver holidays (in which a person abstains from drinking for several days a week).

RESULTS

A J-shaped association was observed between alcohol intake and total mortality in men (nondrinkers: reference; occasional drinkers: hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-0.80; 1-149 g/week: HR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.71-0.81; 150-299 g/week: HR 0.75; 95% CI, 0.70-0.80; 300-449 g/week: HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.78-0.91; 450-599 g/week: HR 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83-1.01; and ≥600 g/week: HR 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07-1.32) and in women (nondrinkers: reference; occasional: HR 0.75; 95% CI, 0.70-0.82; 1-149 g/week: HR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.73-0.88; 150-299 g/week: HR 0.91; 95% CI, 0.74-1.13; 300-449 g/week: HR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.73-1.48; and ≥450 g/week: HR 1.59; 95% CI, 1.07-2.38). In current drinkers, alcohol consumption was associated with a linear, positive increase in mortality risk from all causes, cancer, and cerebrovascular disease in both men and women, but not heart disease in men. Taking of liver holidays was associated with a lower risk of cancer and cerebrovascular disease mortality in men.

CONCLUSIONS

Alcohol intake showed J-shaped associations with the risk of total mortality and three leading causes of death. However, heavy drinking increases the risk of mortality, which highlights the necessity of drinking in moderation coupled with liver holidays.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo. Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo. Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine.Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29129895

Citation

Saito, Eiko, et al. "Impact of Alcohol Intake and Drinking Patterns On Mortality From All Causes and Major Causes of Death in a Japanese Population." Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 28, no. 3, 2018, pp. 140-148.
Saito E, Inoue M, Sawada N, et al. Impact of Alcohol Intake and Drinking Patterns on Mortality From All Causes and Major Causes of Death in a Japanese Population. J Epidemiol. 2018;28(3):140-148.
Saito, E., Inoue, M., Sawada, N., Charvat, H., Shimazu, T., Yamaji, T., ... Tsugane, S. (2018). Impact of Alcohol Intake and Drinking Patterns on Mortality From All Causes and Major Causes of Death in a Japanese Population. Journal of Epidemiology, 28(3), pp. 140-148. doi:10.2188/jea.JE20160200.
Saito E, et al. Impact of Alcohol Intake and Drinking Patterns On Mortality From All Causes and Major Causes of Death in a Japanese Population. J Epidemiol. 2018 Mar 5;28(3):140-148. PubMed PMID: 29129895.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of Alcohol Intake and Drinking Patterns on Mortality From All Causes and Major Causes of Death in a Japanese Population. AU - Saito,Eiko, AU - Inoue,Manami, AU - Sawada,Norie, AU - Charvat,Hadrien, AU - Shimazu,Taichi, AU - Yamaji,Taiki, AU - Iwasaki,Motoki, AU - Sasazuki,Shizuka, AU - Mizoue,Tetsuya, AU - Iso,Hiroyasu, AU - Tsugane,Shoichiro, Y1 - 2017/11/11/ PY - 2017/11/14/pubmed PY - 2018/6/5/medline PY - 2017/11/14/entrez KW - Japan/epidemiology KW - adult KW - alcohol KW - cardiovascular diseases/mortality KW - follow-up studies KW - mortality KW - neoplasms/mortality KW - proportional hazards models SP - 140 EP - 148 JF - Journal of epidemiology JO - J Epidemiol VL - 28 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: We examined the associations of alcohol consumption and liver holidays with all-cause mortality and with mortality due to cancer, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, respiratory disease, and injury using a large-scale prospective study in Japan. METHODS: We followed 102,849 Japanese who were aged between 40 and 69 years at baseline for 18.2 years on average, during which 15,203 deaths were reported. Associations between alcohol intake and mortality risk were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model, with analysis by the number of liver holidays (in which a person abstains from drinking for several days a week). RESULTS: A J-shaped association was observed between alcohol intake and total mortality in men (nondrinkers: reference; occasional drinkers: hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-0.80; 1-149 g/week: HR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.71-0.81; 150-299 g/week: HR 0.75; 95% CI, 0.70-0.80; 300-449 g/week: HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.78-0.91; 450-599 g/week: HR 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83-1.01; and ≥600 g/week: HR 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07-1.32) and in women (nondrinkers: reference; occasional: HR 0.75; 95% CI, 0.70-0.82; 1-149 g/week: HR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.73-0.88; 150-299 g/week: HR 0.91; 95% CI, 0.74-1.13; 300-449 g/week: HR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.73-1.48; and ≥450 g/week: HR 1.59; 95% CI, 1.07-2.38). In current drinkers, alcohol consumption was associated with a linear, positive increase in mortality risk from all causes, cancer, and cerebrovascular disease in both men and women, but not heart disease in men. Taking of liver holidays was associated with a lower risk of cancer and cerebrovascular disease mortality in men. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol intake showed J-shaped associations with the risk of total mortality and three leading causes of death. However, heavy drinking increases the risk of mortality, which highlights the necessity of drinking in moderation coupled with liver holidays. SN - 1349-9092 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29129895/Impact_of_Alcohol_Intake_and_Drinking_Patterns_on_Mortality_From_All_Causes_and_Major_Causes_of_Death_in_a_Japanese_Population_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20160200 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -