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Impaired mismatch negativity to frequency deviants in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis, and preliminary evidence for further impairment with transition to psychosis.
Schizophr Res. 2018 01; 191:95-100.SR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is evidence to suggest that people with established psychotic disorders show impairments in the mismatch negativity induced by a frequency-deviant sound (fMMN), and that these impairments worsen with the deterioration of psychotic symptoms. This study aimed to test whether individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis show pre-morbid impairments in fMMN, and if so, whether fMMN continues to deteriorate with transition to psychosis.

METHOD

fMMN was recorded in a cohort of UHR individuals (n=42) and compared to healthy controls (n=29). Of the 27 UHR participants who returned for a second EEG session, six participants had transitioned to psychosis by 12-month follow-up (UHR-T) and were compared to the 21 participants who did not transition (UHR-NT).

RESULTS

fMMN amplitude was significantly reduced, relative to healthy controls, in the UHR cohort. Furthermore, UHR-T individuals showed a significant decrease in fMMN amplitude over the period from baseline to post-transition; this reduction was not observed in UHR-NT.

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that fMMN is abnormal in UHR individuals, as has repeatedly been found previously in people with established psychotic disorders. The finding that fMMN impairment worsens with transition to psychosis is consistent with the staging model of psychosis; however, caution must be taken in interpreting these findings, given the extremely small sample size of the UHR-T group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia. Electronic address: suzie.lavoie@orygen.org.au.School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen Youth Health, Melbourne Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, 35 Poplar road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia.School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29132815

Citation

Lavoie, Suzie, et al. "Impaired Mismatch Negativity to Frequency Deviants in Individuals at Ultra-high Risk for Psychosis, and Preliminary Evidence for Further Impairment With Transition to Psychosis." Schizophrenia Research, vol. 191, 2018, pp. 95-100.
Lavoie S, Jack BN, Griffiths O, et al. Impaired mismatch negativity to frequency deviants in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis, and preliminary evidence for further impairment with transition to psychosis. Schizophr Res. 2018;191:95-100.
Lavoie, S., Jack, B. N., Griffiths, O., Ando, A., Amminger, P., Couroupis, A., Jago, A., Markulev, C., McGorry, P. D., Nelson, B., Polari, A., Yuen, H. P., & Whitford, T. J. (2018). Impaired mismatch negativity to frequency deviants in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis, and preliminary evidence for further impairment with transition to psychosis. Schizophrenia Research, 191, 95-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.11.005
Lavoie S, et al. Impaired Mismatch Negativity to Frequency Deviants in Individuals at Ultra-high Risk for Psychosis, and Preliminary Evidence for Further Impairment With Transition to Psychosis. Schizophr Res. 2018;191:95-100. PubMed PMID: 29132815.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impaired mismatch negativity to frequency deviants in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis, and preliminary evidence for further impairment with transition to psychosis. AU - Lavoie,Suzie, AU - Jack,Bradley N, AU - Griffiths,Oren, AU - Ando,Ayaka, AU - Amminger,Paul, AU - Couroupis,Anthony, AU - Jago,Aidan, AU - Markulev,Connie, AU - McGorry,Patrick D, AU - Nelson,Barnaby, AU - Polari,Andrea, AU - Yuen,Hok Pan, AU - Whitford,Thomas J, Y1 - 2017/11/11/ PY - 2017/07/11/received PY - 2017/11/01/revised PY - 2017/11/01/accepted PY - 2017/11/15/pubmed PY - 2018/10/31/medline PY - 2017/11/15/entrez KW - Event-related potential (ERP) KW - Mismatch negativity (MMN) KW - Psychosis KW - Transition KW - Ultra high risk (UHR) SP - 95 EP - 100 JF - Schizophrenia research JO - Schizophr Res VL - 191 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is evidence to suggest that people with established psychotic disorders show impairments in the mismatch negativity induced by a frequency-deviant sound (fMMN), and that these impairments worsen with the deterioration of psychotic symptoms. This study aimed to test whether individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis show pre-morbid impairments in fMMN, and if so, whether fMMN continues to deteriorate with transition to psychosis. METHOD: fMMN was recorded in a cohort of UHR individuals (n=42) and compared to healthy controls (n=29). Of the 27 UHR participants who returned for a second EEG session, six participants had transitioned to psychosis by 12-month follow-up (UHR-T) and were compared to the 21 participants who did not transition (UHR-NT). RESULTS: fMMN amplitude was significantly reduced, relative to healthy controls, in the UHR cohort. Furthermore, UHR-T individuals showed a significant decrease in fMMN amplitude over the period from baseline to post-transition; this reduction was not observed in UHR-NT. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that fMMN is abnormal in UHR individuals, as has repeatedly been found previously in people with established psychotic disorders. The finding that fMMN impairment worsens with transition to psychosis is consistent with the staging model of psychosis; however, caution must be taken in interpreting these findings, given the extremely small sample size of the UHR-T group. SN - 1573-2509 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29132815/Impaired_mismatch_negativity_to_frequency_deviants_in_individuals_at_ultra_high_risk_for_psychosis_and_preliminary_evidence_for_further_impairment_with_transition_to_psychosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0920-9964(17)30677-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -