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Common Cutaneous Bacteria Isolated from Snakes Inhibit Growth of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola.
Ecohealth. 2018 03; 15(1):109-120.E

Abstract

There is increasing concern regarding potential impacts of snake fungal disease (SFD), caused by Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola (Oo), on free-ranging snake populations in the eastern USA. The snake cutaneous microbiome likely serves as the first line of defense against Oo and other pathogens; however, little is known about microbial associations in snakes. The objective of this study was to better define the composition and immune function of the snake cutaneous microbiome. Eight timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) and four black racers (Coluber constrictor) were captured in Arkansas and Tennessee, with some snakes exhibiting signs of SFD. Oo was detected through real-time qPCR in five snakes. Additional histopathological techniques confirmed a diagnosis of SFD in one racer, the species' first confirmed case of SFD in Tennessee. Fifty-eight bacterial and five fungal strains were isolated from skin swabs and identified with Sanger sequencing. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and PERMANOVA analyses indicated that the culturable microbiome does not differ between snake species. Fifteen bacterial strains isolated from rattlesnakes and a single strain isolated from a racer inhibited growth of Oo in vitro. Results shed light on the culturable cutaneous microbiome of snakes and probiotic members that may play a role in fighting an emergent disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, 1100 North Dixie Avenue, Box 5063, Cookeville, TN, 38505, USA. aubreehill@tntech.edu.Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, 1100 North Dixie Avenue, Box 5063, Cookeville, TN, 38505, USA.Biology Department, Cumberland University, Lebanon, TN, USA.Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, 1100 North Dixie Avenue, Box 5063, Cookeville, TN, 38505, USA.Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, 1100 North Dixie Avenue, Box 5063, Cookeville, TN, 38505, USA.Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, 1100 North Dixie Avenue, Box 5063, Cookeville, TN, 38505, USA.Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, 1100 North Dixie Avenue, Box 5063, Cookeville, TN, 38505, USA. Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Nashville, TN, USA.Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. Environment and Natural Resources, Wildlife Division, Government of the Northwest Territories, Yellowknife, NT, Canada.Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.Wildlife Epidemiology Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, 1100 North Dixie Avenue, Box 5063, Cookeville, TN, 38505, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29134436

Citation

Hill, Aubree J., et al. "Common Cutaneous Bacteria Isolated From Snakes Inhibit Growth of Ophidiomyces Ophiodiicola." EcoHealth, vol. 15, no. 1, 2018, pp. 109-120.
Hill AJ, Leys JE, Bryan D, et al. Common Cutaneous Bacteria Isolated from Snakes Inhibit Growth of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Ecohealth. 2018;15(1):109-120.
Hill, A. J., Leys, J. E., Bryan, D., Erdman, F. M., Malone, K. S., Russell, G. N., Applegate, R. D., Fenton, H., Niedringhaus, K., Miller, A. N., Allender, M. C., & Walker, D. M. (2018). Common Cutaneous Bacteria Isolated from Snakes Inhibit Growth of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. EcoHealth, 15(1), 109-120. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10393-017-1289-y
Hill AJ, et al. Common Cutaneous Bacteria Isolated From Snakes Inhibit Growth of Ophidiomyces Ophiodiicola. Ecohealth. 2018;15(1):109-120. PubMed PMID: 29134436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Common Cutaneous Bacteria Isolated from Snakes Inhibit Growth of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. AU - Hill,Aubree J, AU - Leys,Jacob E, AU - Bryan,Danny, AU - Erdman,Fantasia M, AU - Malone,Katherine S, AU - Russell,Gabrielle N, AU - Applegate,Roger D, AU - Fenton,Heather, AU - Niedringhaus,Kevin, AU - Miller,Andrew N, AU - Allender,Matthew C, AU - Walker,Donald M, Y1 - 2017/11/13/ PY - 2016/10/22/received PY - 2017/10/06/accepted PY - 2017/10/05/revised PY - 2017/11/15/pubmed PY - 2019/1/29/medline PY - 2017/11/15/entrez KW - Cutaneous microbiome KW - Dermatophytic fungi KW - Emerging fungal pathogens KW - Wildlife disease SP - 109 EP - 120 JF - EcoHealth JO - Ecohealth VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - There is increasing concern regarding potential impacts of snake fungal disease (SFD), caused by Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola (Oo), on free-ranging snake populations in the eastern USA. The snake cutaneous microbiome likely serves as the first line of defense against Oo and other pathogens; however, little is known about microbial associations in snakes. The objective of this study was to better define the composition and immune function of the snake cutaneous microbiome. Eight timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) and four black racers (Coluber constrictor) were captured in Arkansas and Tennessee, with some snakes exhibiting signs of SFD. Oo was detected through real-time qPCR in five snakes. Additional histopathological techniques confirmed a diagnosis of SFD in one racer, the species' first confirmed case of SFD in Tennessee. Fifty-eight bacterial and five fungal strains were isolated from skin swabs and identified with Sanger sequencing. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and PERMANOVA analyses indicated that the culturable microbiome does not differ between snake species. Fifteen bacterial strains isolated from rattlesnakes and a single strain isolated from a racer inhibited growth of Oo in vitro. Results shed light on the culturable cutaneous microbiome of snakes and probiotic members that may play a role in fighting an emergent disease. SN - 1612-9210 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29134436/Common_Cutaneous_Bacteria_Isolated_from_Snakes_Inhibit_Growth_of_Ophidiomyces_ophiodiicola_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10393-017-1289-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -