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Association of metabolic syndrome and its components with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the elderly: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Nov; 96(45):e8491.M

Abstract

There is increasing evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome and mortality. However, previous research examining metabolic syndrome and mortality in older populations has produced mixed results. In addition, there is a clear need to identify and manage individual components of metabolic syndrome to decrease cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. In this meta-analysis, we searched the MEDLINE databases using PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases. Based on 20 prospective cohort studies, metabolic syndrome was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality [relative risk (RR), 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-1.32; I = 55.9%] and CVD mortality (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11-1.39; I = 58.1%). The risk estimates of all-cause mortality for single components of metabolic syndrome were significant for higher values of waist circumference or body mass index (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-1.00), higher values of blood glucose (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05-1.34), and lower values of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02-1.21). In the elderly population, metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. Among the individual components of metabolic syndrome, increased blood glucose and HDL cholesterol levels were significantly associated with increased mortality. However, older obese or overweight individuals may have a decreased mortality risk. Thus, the findings of the current meta-analysis raise questions about the utility of the definition of metabolic syndrome in predicting all-cause mortality and CVD mortality in the elderly population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDepartment of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea bDepartment of Biostatistics, Korea University College of Medicine cDepartment of Family Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan-Si Gyeonggi, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29137039

Citation

Ju, Sang-Yhun, et al. "Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components With All-cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in the Elderly: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." Medicine, vol. 96, no. 45, 2017, pp. e8491.
Ju SY, Lee JY, Kim DH. Association of metabolic syndrome and its components with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the elderly: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017;96(45):e8491.
Ju, S. Y., Lee, J. Y., & Kim, D. H. (2017). Association of metabolic syndrome and its components with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the elderly: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Medicine, 96(45), e8491. https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000008491
Ju SY, Lee JY, Kim DH. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components With All-cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in the Elderly: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017;96(45):e8491. PubMed PMID: 29137039.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of metabolic syndrome and its components with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the elderly: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Ju,Sang-Yhun, AU - Lee,June-Young, AU - Kim,Do-Hoon, PY - 2017/11/16/entrez PY - 2017/11/16/pubmed PY - 2017/12/5/medline SP - e8491 EP - e8491 JF - Medicine JO - Medicine (Baltimore) VL - 96 IS - 45 N2 - There is increasing evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome and mortality. However, previous research examining metabolic syndrome and mortality in older populations has produced mixed results. In addition, there is a clear need to identify and manage individual components of metabolic syndrome to decrease cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. In this meta-analysis, we searched the MEDLINE databases using PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases. Based on 20 prospective cohort studies, metabolic syndrome was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality [relative risk (RR), 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-1.32; I = 55.9%] and CVD mortality (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11-1.39; I = 58.1%). The risk estimates of all-cause mortality for single components of metabolic syndrome were significant for higher values of waist circumference or body mass index (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-1.00), higher values of blood glucose (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05-1.34), and lower values of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02-1.21). In the elderly population, metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. Among the individual components of metabolic syndrome, increased blood glucose and HDL cholesterol levels were significantly associated with increased mortality. However, older obese or overweight individuals may have a decreased mortality risk. Thus, the findings of the current meta-analysis raise questions about the utility of the definition of metabolic syndrome in predicting all-cause mortality and CVD mortality in the elderly population. SN - 1536-5964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29137039/Association_of_metabolic_syndrome_and_its_components_with_all_cause_and_cardiovascular_mortality_in_the_elderly:_A_meta_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000008491 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -