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Salt + Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration Enhances Fluid Retention More Than Salt- or Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration.
Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2018 May 01; 28(3):246-252.IJ

Abstract

Hyperhydration has been demonstrated to improve work capacity and cardiovascular and thermoregulatory functions, enhance orthostatic tolerance, slow or neutralize bone demineralization, and decrease postdive bubble formation. Adding sodium or glycerol to a hyperhydration solution optimizes fluid retention. Sodium and glycerol produce their effect through different physiological mechanisms. If combined into a hyperhydration solution, their impact on fluid retention could potentially be greater than their singular effect. We compared the effect of salt-induced hyperhydration (SIH), glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH), and salt + glycerol-induced hyperhydration (SGIH) on fluid balance responses during a 3-hr passive experiment. Using a randomized, crossover, and counterbalanced experiment, 15 young men (22 ± 4 years) underwent three, 3-hr hyperhydration experiments during which they ingested 30 ml/kg fat-free mass (FFM) of water with an artificial sweetener plus either (a) 7.5 g of table salt/L (SIH), (b) 1.4 g glycerol/kg FFM (GIH), or (c) 7.5 g of table salt/L + 1.4 g glycerol/kg FFM (SGIH). After 3 hr, there were no significant differences in plasma volume changes among experiments (SIH: 11.3% ± 9.9%; GIH: 7.6% ± 12.7%; SGIH: 11.3% ± 13.7%). Total urine production was significantly lower (SIH: 775 ± 329 ml; GIH: 1,248 ± 270 ml; SGIH: 551 ± 208 ml) and fluid retention higher (SIH: 1,127 ± 212 ml; GIH: 729 ± 115 ml; SGIH: 1,435 ± 140 ml) with SGIH than either GIH or SIH. Abdominal discomfort was low and not significantly different among experiments. In conclusion, results show that SGIH reduces urine production and provides more fluid retention than either SIH or GIH.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 University of Sherbrooke.1 University of Sherbrooke.1 University of Sherbrooke.1 University of Sherbrooke.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29140136

Citation

Goulet, Eric D B., et al. "Salt + Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration Enhances Fluid Retention More Than Salt- or Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration." International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, vol. 28, no. 3, 2018, pp. 246-252.
Goulet EDB, De La Flore A, Savoie FA, et al. Salt + Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration Enhances Fluid Retention More Than Salt- or Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2018;28(3):246-252.
Goulet, E. D. B., De La Flore, A., Savoie, F. A., & Gosselin, J. (2018). Salt + Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration Enhances Fluid Retention More Than Salt- or Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 28(3), 246-252. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2017-0310
Goulet EDB, et al. Salt + Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration Enhances Fluid Retention More Than Salt- or Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2018 May 1;28(3):246-252. PubMed PMID: 29140136.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Salt + Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration Enhances Fluid Retention More Than Salt- or Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration. AU - Goulet,Eric D B, AU - De La Flore,Adrien, AU - Savoie,Félix A, AU - Gosselin,Jonathan, Y1 - 2018/05/17/ PY - 2017/11/16/pubmed PY - 2018/8/9/medline PY - 2017/11/16/entrez KW - glycerin KW - overhydration KW - table salt SP - 246 EP - 252 JF - International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism JO - Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab VL - 28 IS - 3 N2 - Hyperhydration has been demonstrated to improve work capacity and cardiovascular and thermoregulatory functions, enhance orthostatic tolerance, slow or neutralize bone demineralization, and decrease postdive bubble formation. Adding sodium or glycerol to a hyperhydration solution optimizes fluid retention. Sodium and glycerol produce their effect through different physiological mechanisms. If combined into a hyperhydration solution, their impact on fluid retention could potentially be greater than their singular effect. We compared the effect of salt-induced hyperhydration (SIH), glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH), and salt + glycerol-induced hyperhydration (SGIH) on fluid balance responses during a 3-hr passive experiment. Using a randomized, crossover, and counterbalanced experiment, 15 young men (22 ± 4 years) underwent three, 3-hr hyperhydration experiments during which they ingested 30 ml/kg fat-free mass (FFM) of water with an artificial sweetener plus either (a) 7.5 g of table salt/L (SIH), (b) 1.4 g glycerol/kg FFM (GIH), or (c) 7.5 g of table salt/L + 1.4 g glycerol/kg FFM (SGIH). After 3 hr, there were no significant differences in plasma volume changes among experiments (SIH: 11.3% ± 9.9%; GIH: 7.6% ± 12.7%; SGIH: 11.3% ± 13.7%). Total urine production was significantly lower (SIH: 775 ± 329 ml; GIH: 1,248 ± 270 ml; SGIH: 551 ± 208 ml) and fluid retention higher (SIH: 1,127 ± 212 ml; GIH: 729 ± 115 ml; SGIH: 1,435 ± 140 ml) with SGIH than either GIH or SIH. Abdominal discomfort was low and not significantly different among experiments. In conclusion, results show that SGIH reduces urine production and provides more fluid retention than either SIH or GIH. SN - 1543-2742 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29140136/Salt_+_Glycerol_Induced_Hyperhydration_Enhances_Fluid_Retention_More_Than_Salt__or_Glycerol_Induced_Hyperhydration_ L2 - https://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/10.1123/ijsnem.2017-0310 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -